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first_imgFans of Kitchen Dwellers are heading into the new week with some new music from the progressive bluegrass outfit. The band released the second installment of their cover series this past Friday (July 31st) with Reheated, Vol. 2, a three-track EP which features cover recordings of songs made famous by Pink Floyd, including “Welcome to the Machine”, “Hey You”, and “Pigs (Three Different Ones)”.To celebrate the release, the band hosted a pair of free concert webcasts branded as, “Live From The Cabin,” which took place over the weekend on Friday and Saturday nights as streamed for free on the band’s YouTube in addition to American Songwriter. The live-streamed performances took place in an unspecified cabin located somewhere within the Bridger Mountains just outside of Bozeman, MT.The first installment of the two-night webcast event on Friday featured performances from the band’s catalog, including “Five Candles”, “Broken Cage”, “Sunday Funday”, “Muir Maid”, and more. Saturday’s webcast also featured the live debut of Pink Floyd’s “Mother”, along with a mix of teases sprinkled in throughout the 13-song set.Related: Magic Beans Deliver Sold-Out Beanstalk: At The Drive-In With Cycles, Kitchen Dwellers, More [Photos]Relive the three sets from over the weekend with the two “Live From The Cabin” video performances and setlist info below.Setlist: Kitchen Dwellers | Live From The Cabin | Nowhere, MT | 7/31/2020Set One: Five Candles, Here We Go > Can’t Stop Now, Last Year > Broken Cage (1) > Sunday Funday, Down In The Lonesome Draw, The Crown > Guilty (2) > The Crown (3)Set Two: Shadows, Muir Maid > No More To Leave You Behind, Red Haired Boy > Buckle Down, Woods Lake > Driftwood, Covered Bridges > High On A Mountaintop > Covered Bridges > New HorizonsNotes:(1) Last Year tease(2) Lyric change “Bust right through the cabin door, oh look here it’s Jesse Korb”(3) Guilty teasesKitchen Dwellers – ‘Live From The Cabin’ Night One – 7/31/20[Video: Kitchen Dwellers]Setlist: Kitchen Dwellers | Live From The Cabin | Nowhere, MT | 8/1/2020Set: Welcome To The Machine (Pink Floyd cover) > The Quail > The Comet, Mother (1) > Hey You > Sunday Scaries > Pigs (Three Different Ones) (Pink Floyd cover) (2) > Foundation (3)(4)(5), Ghost In The Bottle > Careful With That Axe (Pink Floyd cover), Eugene (1) > The Living Dread > Ghost In The Bottle > Brain Damage (Pink Floyd cover) (1)(6)> Eclipse (1)Notes:(1) Pink Floyd, first time played(2) lyric change, “Donny you’re nearly a treat”(3) Hey You teases(4) Pigs teases(5) Welcome to The Machine teases(6) Goodbye, Blue Sky introKitchen Dwellers – ‘Live From The Cabin’ Night Two – 8/1/20[Video: Kitchen Dwellers]last_img read more

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Janette “Net” S. Pulito

first_img She loved taking care of her family, cooking, quilting and traveling. She especially enjoyed going to their camp at Toledo Bend.She was a devoted Baptist and member of First Baptist Church of Groves and the FaithSunday School Class.Funeral services will be held at 2:00 p.m., Tuesday, March 28, 2017 at Levingston Funeral Home in Groves with Reverend Charles Miller and Dr. Joe Worley officiating. Burial will follow in Oak Bluff Memorial Park. Janette “Net” S. Pulito, went to be with the Lord on Saturday, March 25, 2017.She was born on May 13, 1931 in Port Arthur, Texas to Burl C. Stanley and Lora Jordan Stanley.“Net” was a graduate of Thomas Jefferson High School and member of the Red Hussar Drum and Bugle Corp. She attended Port Arthur College and worked at Gulf Oil for 6 years until her son was born. A visitation for family and friends will be before the service from 1:00 to 2:00 p.m. at the funeral home.She was preceded in death by her parents, Burl C. Stanley and Lora J. Stanley and her sister, Linda.Janette is survived by her husband of 66 plus years, Vincent “Vince” Pulito of Port Neches, son Brian Pulito and wife Felicia of Groves, granddaughter Kimberly Paige Pulito, great granddaughter Alora, brother Dr. R.T. Stanley of Lindale, TX, sister in law Loraine Brady of Katy, TX and numerous nieces and nephews.“Net” will be greatly missed by all.center_img The family would like to thank Compassion Hospice and especially nurse Carol David and Angie for their loving care.Friends wishing to make memorial contributions may send them to: First Baptist Church of Groves, Youth Department, 4000 Grant, Groves, TX 77619.last_img read more

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CavOILcade Parade canceled this year

first_img This parade was originally scheduled for Saturday, Oct.14, 2017 and along with everything else scheduled for the 2017 celebration, events have just recently been held, she said.Tropical Storm Harvey is to blame for the October postponement of the event. For the first time in the 65-year history of CavOILcade, there will be no parade.Pam Trosclair, executive director of CavOIlcade said there are a number of factors involved in this decision, including commitments several of the princesses already had, weather, and illness. Anyone that had signed up to participate in the parade will be contacted in the next day or so.center_img “We were able to get all the events rescheduled to meet the princess schedules, but the parade is one event we just cannot do,” Trosclair said. “We held coronation this past Saturday night and it was beautiful as always. Those white dresses and black tuxedos on these young people were stunning. We appreciate all the community support for CavOILcade, and look for princess applications to be mailed out in February.”last_img read more

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Vermont’s Blue Spruce Farm wins national award for dairy farm sustainability

first_imgDuring a special awards ceremony held in Washington, D.C. on March 7 – the eve of National Agriculture Day – the Innovation Center for US Dairy announced the winners of the inaugural US Dairy Sustainability Awards, a program to recognize dairy farms, dairy companies and collaborative partnerships for efforts that advance the sustainability of the American dairy industry.Blue Spruce Farm, operated by the Audet family of Bridport, Vermont, was named a winner of the prestigious award for Outstanding Dairy Farm Sustainability. Widely recognized as a dairy pioneer, Blue Spruce Farm received the national honor in recognition of its commitment to sustainability. Blue Spruce was one of the first farms in the nation to install a variable speed vacuum pump control, reducing energy used during milking by nearly 60 percent. Blue Spruce also served as the pilot dairy farm to launch the successful Central Vermont Public Service’s Cow Powerâ ¢ program, which allows consumers to purchase renewable energy generated by dairy farms. By implementing new technologies in milking, milk cooling, barn construction, ventilation, water heating and lighting, the farm reduced energy use 50% from an average of 1,000 kWh per cow per year, to an average of just 500 kWh per cow per year. These savings, in turn, reduced greenhouse gas emissions by an estimated 500 pounds of CO2e per cow per year.”We’re thrilled with this national recognition of Eugene and Marie Audet and their family,” said Neal Rea, Chairman of the Board of Agri-Mark, the northeast’s premier dairy cooperative, and a N.Y. state dairy farmer himself. Agri-Mark is the parent company of the award winning Cabot and McCadam dairy brands. “The Audets, like many of our cooperative’s dairy farmers, have not only embraced sustainable farming practices, they have taken them to a whole new level,” Rea continued. “The Audets are leading by example as they incorporate pioneering nutrient and energy management practices into all facets of their operation.  They’re embracing new and emerging technologies and paving the way for all our farmers to produce the highest quality dairy products possible while preserving and protecting the planet’s natural resources.””We, and all farm families, simply by our very nature, have been developing and implementing sustainable practices for generations,” said Marie Audet in her acceptance speech. “My husband, Eugene, and I are delighted to receive this award on behalf of our family because it is actually a public affirmation of our desire to produce quality milk in a way that is good for our animals, good for the environment and good for our community.”An independent panel of judges representing the full spectrum of the dairy supply chain ‘ as well as academia, government, media, business and non-governmental organizations ‘ selected this year’s winners based on each applicant’s results as measured by economic, environmental and social responsibility aspects.”In reviewing more than 40 nominations and selecting the ‘best of the best,’ the Sustainability Awards judges were impressed by the model programs and processes that deliver real benefit to the business, community and the environment,” said Molly Jahn, who serves as special adviser for Sustainability Science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and as the U.S. Commissioner on Sustainable Agriculture and Climate Change. “Clearly, sustainability is core to the success of these farms and organizations. They serve as leaders in their communities and industry.”The awards are part of the U.S. Dairy Sustainability Commitment, an industry-wide effort to measure and improve the economic, environmental and social sustainability of the dairy industry. Launched in 2008, the Sustainability Commitment is supported by hundreds of organizations, including universities, government agencies and non-governmental organizations.BLUE SPRUCE FARMBlue Spruce Farm is a third generation dairy farm located in Bridport, Vermont.  Owned and operated by the Audet family, the farm produces more than 3.6 million gallons of milk annually and crops 3,000 acres to provide feed for their cows.  Milk from the farm is used to make Cabot’s Vermont Cheddar Cheese and other dairy products marketed.  Blue Spruce is perhaps best known for being the pioneering Cow Powerâ ¢farm in Vermont.  Cow Powerâ ¢ allows consumers to purchase renewable energy generated on a dairy farm that results in substantial savings of traditional fossil fuels, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, and a cleaner environment.ABOUT AGRI-MARKAgri-Mark, with $900 million in 2012 sales, markets more than 300 million gallons of farm fresh milk each year for more than 1,250 dairy farm families in New England and New York. The cooperative is headquartered in Methuen, Mass., has been marketing milk for dairy farmers since 1913, and actively represents their legislative interests in the Northeast and in Washington, D.C.Agri-Mark farmers own the award-winning Cabot brand of Vermont Cheddar, butter and other dairy products in addition to the McCadam brand of New York Cheddar, Pepper Jack and other cheeses. Cabothas won the award of World’s Best Cheddar three times and McCadam recently won the award of America’s Best Cheese. Agri-Mark has invested in operations to manufacture and market valuable whey proteins globally while also marketing fresh fluid milk from its local farm families to some of the region’s leading dairy processors. For more information about Agri-Mark, visit our web site at:http://www.agrimark.net(link is external). ABOUT CABOT CREAMERY COOPERATIVECabot Creamery Cooperative has been in continuous operation in Vermont since 1919 and produces a full line of cheeses, yogurt, sour cream, cottage cheese, and butter. Best known as makers of “The World’s Best Cheddar,” Cabot is the flagship brand of the Agri-Mark dairy cooperative and is owned by 1250 dairy farm families located throughout New England and upstate New York. For additional information on Cabot Creamery, visit http://www.cabotcheese.coop(link is external)SOURCE Cabot Creamery CooperativeWeb Site: www.cabotcheese.coop(link is external)last_img read more

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first_imgThe Merriam City Council is moving to extend the terms of the mayor and council members to comply with the new state election regulations, but is likely to keep largely intact its method for filling vacancies on the council.The council Monday heard ordinances on first reading that will make the series of modifications to its election ordinances.The first change moves the election cycle to November for the general election and August for the primary to comply with the state law passed in 2015. Merriam already was on an odd-year election cycle. The change does extend the terms of the mayor and all of the current council members from April to the following January after elections in both 2017 and 2019.Merriam also plans to keep its requirement that the primary election reduce the number of candidates to two for the general election. The state law only requires the primary cut the field to three for the general election.The city also will keep its method of filling council vacancies. Merriam interviews candidates for a vacant city council position in open session. The city’s procedure calls for narrowing the candidates down to two and then uses a final vote of the council to pick the eventual replacement.In one change, the ordinance revisions have the governing body – which includes the mayor – voting for the council replacements rather than just the council. That language matches the state law. A question was raised Monday about a potential tie vote for a vacancy because the mayor and remaining seven council members would make an even number.last_img read more

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first_imgA bust of the Indian mascot sits in the main hallway of Shawnee Mission North.The male student playing the Shawnee Mission North Indian chief mascot will no longer wear a headdress and the female student playing the Indian princess will no longer kneel before the chief in pre-game ceremonies.Those are two of the most significant changes the school is making to its mascot program after a review process this spring that included four focus groups on use of the Indian as a mascot and other diversity issues. That review process came in the wake of the Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma’s decision to rescind the permission it had granted in 1992 for the use of the Indian as a mascot at the school. Shawnee Mission North’s sports teams have been called the Indians since the school opened as Shawnee Mission Rural High School in the 1920s.“I think it’s a situation that we’re always going to continue to monitor,” said Shawnee Mission North Principal Dave Tappan of the district’s decision to continue using the Indian mascot. “And we’re going to do what’s best for the Shawnee Mission North community and the Shawnee Mission North student body and the alumni as we move through on making difficult decisions. We always want to do what’s best for our students, and in this case at this point, we think the best thing is to continue to carry on the tradition as the Shawnee Mission North Indians.”The four focus groups, which featured separate groups of around a dozen community members, educators, high school students and middle school students, took place in late March and early April. After those input sessions were complete, building administrators met with district administrators and focus group participants to make the decision on whether to maintain the Indian as the school mascot.“It was a collaborative effort between building administrators and district administrators that, at this point, we would like to continue as the Shawnee Mission North Indians,” Tappan said.Members of the board of education were not directly involved in the decision making process, according to sources familiar with the situation. Some district officials were not aware until this week that a decision had been made in the matter.Tappan emphasized that the school would continue to make efforts to ensure that the mascot program is carried out in a respectful manner. He said that administrators have no tolerance for the “tomahawk chop” cheer, and “put that to an end” if it ever breaks out during a game or pep rally. He and Associate Principal Annette Gonzales said that the application process for serving as the Indian chief or princess is rigorous, and designed to ensure students serving in the role treat it seriously.Tappan said the decision to have the student playing the Indian chief no longer wear a headdress came in response to concerns from community members.“One of the things we learned through the focus groups was what high regard and respect the Indian chief has to have in order to wear that headdress,” Tappan said. “And so we decided the best thing to do at this time was not to have our student that’s servings as as the Indian chief wear that headdress.”The district will continue to use graphics depicting an Indian chief wearing a headdress among its rotation of several logos, however.The Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma’s decision to rescind the permission tribal leaders had granted the district in 1992 came after students at Lawrence High School protested the placement of a banner with the SM North Indian mascot logo inside their school.last_img read more

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Gophers set records in tune-up meet

first_imgSeniors Manny Pollard and Dylan Zoe also set personal records in the event with scores of 436.15 and 419.35 points, respectively. “They’ve been consistent with their work, and we’ve gotten better as the year has gone on,” head coach Kelly Kremer said. “I think our [Big Ten Triple Dual] meet a week ago is kind of reflective of where we are as a team right now, and I just think they need some rest. … We need to really recover and get to the point where we can really just get to the Big Ten Championships and let the fruits of our labor, so to speak, come through.” In swimming, sophomore Conner McHugh won the 100 breaststroke with a time of 55.88. “They’ve prepared great. Now we just need to put the finishing touches on it,” Kremer said. Gophers set records in tune-up meetMatt Barnard set the program record in the 3-meter dive on Saturday.Niti GuptaJunior Ellen Bloom competes in the Women’s 200 Yard Freestyle during Saturday’s 2016 Minnesota Challenge at the Jean K. Freeman Aquatic Center. Thomas JaakolaFebruary 8, 2016Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintThe Gophers men’s and women’s swimming and diving teams combined to set 35 personal records at the Minnesota Challenge on Saturdayin their final tune-up before the Big Ten Championships. Senior Lauren Votava took first in the 100 butterfly, swimming a time of 56.09. Senior John Bushman won the 400 individual medley by more than 23 seconds, finishing in a time of 3:50.08. The women also took the top six spots in the 500 freestyle, led by freshman Erin Emery, who won the event with a personal-best time of 4:53.40. Senior Samantha Harding followed in second place in 5:00.40. Barnard breaks school record “I feel like I’ve prepared well over the course of the season and have had consistent times while racing tired,” McHugh said. “I’m looking forward to feeling rested and know the men’s team and I are excited to have it all come together finally.” The women’s 200 medley relay of freshmen Dani Bergeson, Nicki Ciavarella, Zoe Avestruz and junior Abigail Raatz won the event in a time of 1:44.66. Junior Lexi Tenenbaum won the 1-meter event in diving with 314.25 points, beating out teammates freshman Mariam Khamis and senior Jessica Ramberg. The divers led the men’s team, with junior Matt Barnard setting a school record in the 3-meter dive with 450.95 points. “I didn’t go as fast as I wanted to, but I think that’s a good thing at this point leading up to Big Tens in two weeks,” Votava said. “It would have been nice to [get] a great time, but our focus is on performing our best at conference, and I’m feeling really confident about where I and the entire team are at right now. We’re really excited.” The Gophers also took first through sixth in the 500 freestyle, led by freshman Nick Plachinski, who won the event with a personal-best time of 4:33.11.last_img read more

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Study: MERS-CoV-like virus was in camels in 2003

first_imgResearchers reported yesterday that the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), or a very closely related virus, existed in camels in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in 2003—9 years before it was first found in humans.Writing in Emerging Infectious Diseases, the scientists said they tested camel serum samples that had been collected in 2003 and 2013 and found that most of them—including all of the 2003 specimens—had antibodies to MERS-CoV.”Dromedary camels from the United Arab Emirates were infected at high rates with MERS-CoV or a closely related, probably conspecific [same species], virus long before the first human MERS cases,” says the report by researchers from Germany, the Netherlands, and the UAE. Christian Drosten, MD, of the University of Bonn was the senior author.The first known human MERS cases occurred in Jordan in April 2012. Since then, 177 cases, 74 of them fatal, have been confirmed by the World Health Organization (WHO). The vast majority have been reported on and near the Arabian Peninsula, most of them in Saudi Arabia.The new findings add to the growing evidence that MERS-CoV, or close cousins thereof, circulates in camels, but they don’t answer the key question whether camels are the source of human MERS-CoV infections. Researchers say they need to spell out the genetic sequences of the camel viruses and compare them with human MERS-CoV sequences to unravel that.The findings also raise the question why no human MERS cases were discovered until 2012, if MERS-like viruses were circulating in Middle Eastern camels for years before that. Experts speculate that the virus might not have been genetically equipped to infect humans until very recently.Multiple serologic studies published last year pointed to MERS-CoV-like antibodies in camels in several countries, including Oman, Egypt, the Canary Islands, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia, but did not find the virus itself in the animals.In mid-December, scientists found that three camels on a Qatari farm were infected with MERS-CoV viruses very similar to those in two humans who owned and worked at the farm. But they couldn’t discern if the camels had passed the virus to the people or vice versa, or if both hosts acquired it from some other source.In the new study, the research team collected 651 serum samples from camels in the UAE, including 151 frozen samples obtained in 2003 and 500 gathered in 2013. The animals included young racing camels, adult livestock camels acquired from several other countries, and camels raised at a government veterinary lab.Excluding cross-reactionsIn testing the samples for MERS-CoV, the team took pains to avoid being misled by cross-reactions to bovine coronavirus (BCoV), which belongs to the same genus as MERS-CoV. They used a series of three tests, including an immunofluroescence assay for the MERS-CoV spike protein, a protein microarray, and a MERS-CoV-specific neutralization assay.Overall, the authors found that 632 of 651 camels (97.1%) had antibodies against MERS-CoV, and this included all 151 of the 2003 samples. In addition, they found that 389 samples (59.8%) had high levels of MERS-CoV-neutralizing antibodies (titers higher than 1,280).The neutralization assay made it possible to rule out cross-reactions between MERS-CoV and BCoV, the report says.The researchers found that antibodies were more prevalent in adult camels than in young racing camels, which suggests that camels may be infected as juveniles.They also tested 16 Bactrian camels from a German zoo—a different species from the dromedary camels in the UAE—and found no MERS-CoV antibodies. They said that finding may mean that Bactrian camels are less susceptible to the virus, but a more likely explanation is that the virus has a restricted geographic range.In other steps, the team used polymerase chain reaction testing to look for coronaviruses in fecal samples from 182 of the camels. In two samples they found material that matched up with a strain of BCoV, but there was no evidence of MERS-CoV in the samples.”The high rates of antibody prevalence in contemporary serum samples and samples from 2003 suggest that the virus has spread in camelids for some time,” the authors comment. “However, recognition of camelids as the bona fide reservoir for MERS-CoV has to await sequencing of camelid-associated MERS-related CoV.”They add, “Our finding of high neutralizing antibody titers in camelids is suggestive (but not evidentiary) of the presence of viruses conspecific with MERS-CoV in camelids. Final confirmation will depend on the identification of virus sequences in camelids, which should expectably be closely related to human-specific MERS-CoV sequences.”Vincent Racaniello, PhD, author of Virology Blog and professor of microbiology and immunology at Columbia University, who was not involved in the study, said the findings, in combination with other recent studies, make it clear that viruses related to MERS-CoV have been circulating in camels for some time. The virus may have jumped to camels from bats, but that remains to be demonstrated through sequencing of bat and camel isolates, he added.”It is important to note that serological assays cannot prove that camels are intermediate hosts for the virus, or that the virus originated from bats; only sequence analysis can provide this information,” Racaniello commented by e-mail. He noted that only one study has described any camel MERS-CoV sequences, and no infectious MERS-CoV virus has yet been isolated from a camel.As for why human MERS cases were not detected earlier, he said, “I would speculate that if camels were infected with a MERS-CoV like virus in 2003, then that virus simply did not have the proper nucleotide sequence to infect humans. It might only take one base change, or a handful, to let the 2003 virus infect humans. Perhaps the ‘right’ virus had not yet emerged in camels in 2003. The virus might have only recently entered camels (not long before 2003) and did not have a chance to spawn the mutants that could infect humans.”Other experts commented on the findings in a Canadian Press (CP) story published today, focusing on why no human cases were seen before 2012, if the virus was circulating in camels.Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH, said the possibilities include that there were no human cases from 2003 to 2012, or that there were a few cases in those earlier years, but they went undetected until a change in the virus increased their number. Osterholm is director of the University of Minnesota’s Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, publisher of CIDRAP News.Anthony Mounts, the WHO’s lead scientist on MERS, told the CP he favored the latter explanation. He said the available genetic sequences of MERS suggest that the human virus emerged around mid-2011. That would suggest that the 2003 antibodies might be to a virus that was an ancestor of the current MERS-CoV but not exactly the same virus. That ancestral virus might have caused some human infections that went undetected, he said.Meyer B, Muller MA, Corman VM, et al. Antibodies against MERS coronavirus in dromedary camels, United Arab Emirates, 2003 and 2013. Emerg Infect Dis 2014 Apr;20(4) (Early online release) [Full text]See also: Related Dec 16, 2013, CIDRAP News storyJan 3 CP storylast_img read more

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Data centres not doomed by recession

first_imgTake-up was still 131% higher than 2006, CB Richard Ellis’s 2008 European Data Centre market report showed. Andrew Jay, head of the technology practice group at CBRE, said: ‘The buoyant activity amongst occupiers and developers of technical real estate in Europe during the course of 2008 has defied the global economic downturn and provides strong evidence that the data centre industry has reached a maturity perhaps not previously witnessed. ‘However in 2009, given the constraints in the capital markets, total take-up will reduce and it is likely that there will be fewer of the capital-intensive single-let Shell transactions which have a significant impact on take-up levels. ‘Whilst it is eight years since the dotcom downturn savaged sentiment towards data centre investment and development, the current favourable supply and demand balance underpins the strength of the investment market and has led to an increased profile for the industry amongst real estate professionals.’last_img read more

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Resistance To Northwest Woods Cell Tower

first_imgThose bordering the site of a proposed AT&T monopole cell signal tower in Northwest Woods have lawyered up. At the East Hampton Town Zoning Board of Appeals public hearing on January 21, they voiced opposition to the location, which is the former brush dump site on Old Northwest Road.“This is quite frankly the worst application I have seen anywhere on Long Island or in the state of New York,” said Andrew Campanelli, an attorney for Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Leichter — owners of one of the effected properties on Bull Path.The project is the result of a court-ordered settlement between AT&T and the Town of East Hampton out of the Eastern District of New York’s federal court in Central Islip. In 2017, the town’s planning board rejected AT&T’s proposal to mount antennas onto the wind turbine tower at Iacono Farm on Long Lane, contrary to federal law. The proposed antennas at Iacono Farm were to close a severe cell signal gap that spans from Long Lane through Northwest Woods.“We don’t want the tower. They do,” said Mrs. Leichter about Iacono Farm. She called the Northwest Woods monopole proposal “totally inappropriate.”Under the Federal Telecommunications Act of 1996, once a communications company is able to demonstrate there is a gap in service coverage in a specific area, it cannot, as Chief Judge Dora Irizarry stated in her written order resolving the lawsuit, be prohibited from taking corrective action in an effort to provide “seamless, ubiquitous, and reliable personal wireless services.”Planning board members had rejected the Iacono Farm proposal because the brush dump was their “preferred site.” In the settlement, AT&T agreed to the new location, with the town then required to complete the permitting process for the tower within 60 days of AT&T’s presentation of a formal proposal, which the company did in December. If any town agency delays the permitting process, AT&T can return to Iacono Farm and install the antennas without interference. The deadline for the town to approve the brush dump site is February 19, according to the planning department.But at one point during last Tuesday’s meeting, Campanelli challenged the idea that there even was a gap in service.“I have lived here for 63 years. I have had a cell phone for as long as they were invented. I lived out on Northwest Road,” said zoning board Chairman John Whelan, adding he has weak-to-no-service or dropped calls frequently.David Kirst, attorney for another Bull Path neighbor, Jennifer Gardiner, urged the board to account for the elevation of the proposed site for the monopole. According to Kirst, it is at 100 feet, while his client’s property is only at 50. He too was a proponent of placing the antennas at Iacono Farm. Two other Bull Path neighbors also spoke in opposition during the meeting. NancyLynn Thiele, a senior town attorney, said the zoning board’s role was to only consider the variances.The monopole needs approval because of its height. Under town code, any cell tower must be located twice the distance of its height from neighboring properties. The proposed structure is 185 feet tall, but the original proposal listed it at 160, with AT&T placing antennas at the 155-foot-mark. The town requested AT&T add 25 feet to the height to allow for the placement of emergency communications antennas as part of the town’s upgrade of its emergency communications system.At 160 feet, AT&T did not need any variances, but at 185, now needs setback variances from three neighboring properties, two residential, and one the new Northwest Woods-area fire station. A standard question the zoning board is required to ask of any variance request is: Is the hardship self-imposed?Anna Mercado Clark, an attorney with Phillips Lytle, the firm representing AT&T, reminded the board that the sole reason for the meeting was the town requested the tower be an additional 25 feet taller.“I urge the board to consider the needs of the larger public” when they vote on the variance request, she said.To gear up for a February 5 public hearing, planning board members prepared an environmental impact statement unveiled January 15. In it, the members said the proposed pole would be visible from miles away, including on Long Lane, the site of the much smaller wind turbine tower at Iacono Farm. Kimberly Nisan, another attorney with AT&T’s law firm, had previously explained to the board that the difference in the height requirements from Iacono Farm to the former brush dump was due to geographic factors.“I’m thinking now that maybe Iacono is a better site,” said planning board member Randy Parsons. The planning board’s public hearing on the matter is scheduled for February 5 at 6:30 [email protected] Sharelast_img read more

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