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Markets fall on renewed Greek default fear

first_img whatsapp Tags: NULL whatsapp STOCK markets slid and bond prices fell yesterday on renewed fears that the Greek government will run out of money and default on its debts, as negotiations with creditors drag on.Earlier in the week, the Eurogroup and Greek finance minister Yanis Varoufakis insisted that good progress was being made.But markets are less convinced that the talks will meet their goals. In part that is because the Greek government had proudly stated that it had successfully made a €750m (£537m) repayment to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) – only to reveal yesterday that the money came from another account with the IMF.The government needs to find more than €1bn to pay salaries and other costs at the end of this month, and could run out of cash within weeks.Markets have reacted by selling off government bonds.Germany’s 10-year borrowing costs have risen by 53 basis points in the past month, while Britain’s are up 46 basis points and the US’ 38 points.The picture is starker in the Eurozone periphery, where Spanish yields are up 63 basis points and Italy’s up 60.“It is like groundhog week, this slow, painful faffing about with Greece,” said Mike van Dulken from Accendo Markets.“Wednesday is the big hump, where we see if Greece can make progress. I am not convinced – so far it has messed around moving money from here to there. It is not a technical default, but it has so little money left, it is crazy.”Some of the large swings in prices has also been blamed on a lack of liquidity as few investors are buying or selling, instead sitting on their investments for a lack of a better place to move their money.Traditionally, share prices rise when the economy does well, while investors move into bonds in riskier periods, but quantitative easing from the European Central Bank (ECB) has dampened the effectiveness of that mechanism.Meanwhile, the ECB increased the limit on Greek banks’ emergency loan facilities to €80bn, following worries that the outflow of deposits from the institutions is accelerating.The EuroStoxx50 index of shares fell 1.42 per cent on the day, closely followed by the FTSE100’s 1.37 per cent fall. US stocks joined the slide, with the Dow Jones down 0.2 per cent. Express KCS Show Comments ▼ Markets fall on renewed Greek default fear More From Our Partners Native American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgWhite House Again Downplays Fourth Possible Coronvirus Checkvaluewalk.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgInstitutional Investors Turn To Options to Bet Against AMCvaluewalk.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.org Tuesday 12 May 2015 9:05 pm Sharelast_img read more

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first_img Twitter Laois Councillor ‘amazed’ at Electric Picnic decision to apply for later date for 2021 festival Previous articleThe Week That Was: The Top 10 stories of the past seven daysNext articleGardai arrest men with knives in Portlaoise and recover watch LaoisToday Reporter TAGSTracey Lawlor Twitter Pinterest To make herself one of the best football players in the country, Tracey took on huge sacrifices for the sake of her career.No more so was this highlighted than in 2001. Tracey, who had just turned 18, was looking forward her going to her Debs that summer – and to play in the All-Ireland senior final against Mayo.Unfortunately for Tracey, her debs and the All-Ireland final were within a week of each other – she had a decision to make.She said: “We had Goggy [Sean Delaney] (RIP) training us the year we won the All-Ireland and we would have done anything. He told me I wasn’t allowed go to my debs and I was really upset about it but I was like, ‘Okay if that’s what you want me to do I won’t go to my debs’. I would have done anything.”Competitive, driven and dedicated. Those are the three words Tracey uses to describe herself.However Tracey says the moment she felt she could not longer give that 100 percent commitment was when she decided to call it a day on her club career.“I think for me, circumstances have changed since I had Cian. My focus is not 100 percent on football, him and my family are my focus now.“I always said that I’d like to go out when I don’t have any negative feelings about the sport, instead of hanging in and feeling like it’s taking from somewhere I want to be.”Tracey and her son Cian after Sarsfields were crowned county champions for the sixth year in a row in 2018Long before Tracey was rattling the back of the net in Croke Park, Tracey was tearing through the defence in her home club of Emo GAA.“My earliest memory is playing with the lads. I started off playing with the boys in Emo up until minor level. However I only played one minor match and I broke my wrist in that match against Arles-Killeen.“I remember going up and playing with my twin Paul, going to the boys matches and we’d be getting ready on the car because girls couldn’t go in, and back then the boys wouldn’t tackle you at all. It was always like: ‘Oh my god I can’t believe I’m marking a girl’. But now I don’t think boys really care anymore, they just kick and hit along with the girls.”Tracey then became involved in Emo/Rath community games with girls teams. Here, Tracey and her sister Anne played in U12 and U14 games. They got to the final in Mosney twice but lost out to Cora Staunton’s Carnacon both times.Treacey then joined Courtwood under Peadar Duffy but the team faded away as the girls got older. “You know when girls get to about 16/17 they kind of dropped off.”Tracey  on the attack for Laois against Marie O’Shaughnessy, Meath in the Ladies Leinster Football championship.Picture: Alf Harvey/hrphoto.ieIt was then that Tracey made the decision to join Mountmellick Sarsfields.“It was then that I went to Sarsfields after a long process,” she smiles. “I had so many good years there. Obviously we then have some losses but I kind of got involved when we started having really good success.”The Lawlors are synonymous with all things Emo GAA. Tracey’s father, Gabriel, is also considered to be a legend in Laois GAA circles. Gabriel and Tracey’s uncles Brian, Johnny and Ger all plied their trade in the blue and white jersey for years.Gabriel went on to manage Laois’s All-Ireland minor team of 1996 and was a selector to Mick O’Dwyer when the Laois senior men’s footballers won the Leinster final in 2003.Tracey’s twin Paul is player/manager for Emo senior men’s team, while Anne is Emo GAA PRO and also plays for St Paul’s ladies. Tracey’s nieces Emma and Denise also play, with Emma performing a leading role in the Laois ladies senior panel.“They all have a massive interest in it and would go to all the matches. Daddy and his family would have a huge interest in it too. It was kind of like if you didn’t pick up a ball something was wrong!” Daddy was always delighted that we were involved – he’d obviously love me to play with Emo now but that won’t be happening!” Tracey laughed.Tracey Lawlor on the attack for Laois against Kildare in the NFL.Picture: Alf HarveyTracey’s call up to senior county panel came early. Then manager Tommy Garvan called her into senior panel as a 14 year old in 1998. Although she didn’t feature on the team in 1998, she made her way onto the senior team the following year, at the ripe old age of 15.Tracey was only 18 years old when she helped the Laois ladies claimed their famous All-Ireland win over Mayo in 2001.“It was mad, it went by so quickly, both the game and the celebrations. I remember bits and pieces; I do remember the homecoming and just going to different things for months.“For me, when I was so young, I thought we were going to get loads more. But for the likes of Lulu [Carroll] (RIP) and Mary [Casey] and even Theresa Swayne, they were in so many before. When you look back, that’s definitely the memory that would stick out in my mind.”Tracey spoke about the unity and friendships made during that 2001 squad, which includes the likes of Mary Casey, Angela Casey and the late Lulu Carroll.“Those few years when I joined, the people that looked after me were Mary Casey and Angela [Casey] and Lulu, because they used to bring me to all the games and they wanted young people involved.“They were so, so good. Mary Casey collected me so many times and brought me to matches, and so did Angela.Tracey in the Ladies National Football League round four game between Laois and Mayo. Picture credit: Pat Murphy / SPORTSFILE“They were so funny. I just remember one game we went to and Lulu was driving one car and Mary Casey was driving the other. We stopped at a petrol station to get something.“I think it was Lulu who just went in and got a box of French Fancies and came out and smashed them all over Mary’s window. So Mary had to go into the car wash in that petrol station and get her car washes. They were always playing really funny pranks on each other but they were just a really good crew.“When I started off, they really did mind me. I think then I was so delighted for them when we won the All-Ireland.”From Emo GAA to Sarsfields GAA and Laois glory, the next step for Tracey came with college football.“I definitely think one of the things that really helped me as a footballer was college football.“I was in Ballyfin [College] and I remember Anne Collins was a few years ahead of me but she had it bet into my head from the very start that I was going to UCD, because that’s where she was going.Celebrations for Ballyfin’s Fidelma Bowe, Avril Allen, Tracey Lawlor and Anne Lawlor after winning the Leinster Colleges Junior A Football Final at Newbridge in March 2000.“They did have a really good football team, and had loads of county players. I was there for four years and we won three O’Connor cups and lost in the final of another one,” said the Emo native.She credits those years in UCD as helping to push her into new heights in her footballing career – helping Laois win four Leinster finals in 2001, 2006, 2007, 2011 and starting the winning era of Sarsfields ladies in 2008.“Definitely those years up there gave me a massive belief and it did teach me a lot as well, because they were county players as well and we were training really hard, we had a massive passion so it was a really good team environment to be involved in.“I think that’s what gave me the extra push and extra belief – I just felt like I was really confident coming out of playing there.“There were girls like Nuala O’Shea who captained Mayo to an All-Ireland and girls that were at a different level so you felt like you had to up it another level to compete. That really pushed me on. I think after leaving there I had my really successful years in my career.”Tracey is presented with her All-Star award at the O’Neills TG4 Ladies Football All-Star Awards 2011. Picture credit: Brendan Moran / SPORTSFILEAs Tracey began performing as a top athlete, she started looking after herself like a top athlete, long before the emphasis nutrition and strength and conditioning now receives.“I would have really looked after myself and really planned my days around training; planned my water intake, food intake, everything.“That would have been before dietitians and stuff came in but I would have been conscious of that. If I had a game at 2pm I would have timed two or three meals before that to make sure I had enough fuel in my body.“I know now that there is a lot of focus on it because it does make a difference. You really do feel so much better when you stick to a routine.“You get to know your body and that routine is very specific to a person. You have to really just listen to your body.”“In fairness, I was really good at looking after myself. I didn’t train with the club as much as I could have maybe, but at the same time when you’re playing county at a high level, I kept it to three-four nights a week because I know I need recovery.“I think now some people are overdoing it. There’s a lot of girls out there doing way, way too much and they’re not getting enough out of themselves because they’re tired all the time or they don’t have the sharpness.“I definitely think that you have to listen to your body. I kept to training three-four nights a week because I knew myself like I wouldn’t have been any good to any team otherwise.”“With over-training you’re very tired all the time and it’s very hard to keep the sharpness and that grit when you’re tired.”Tracey Lawlor in full flight for Sarsfield’s against Rebecca McPhilbin, Timahoe in the Laois Ladies Senior Football Final at O’Moore Park.Picture: Alf HarveyHowever even with all of Tracey’s success over the years, there has been many heartbreaks on the football pitch over the years. She recalls the first of these against Inch Rovers from Cork in the All-Ireland semi-final in 2008.“It was the first year that we won in the club championship and we played Inch Rovers down in Cork. It was absolutely lashing rain. I remember before the match we said, ‘It’s going to be called off, it’s going to be called off.’“People just stayed in their cars and turned on their lights because it was so dark. For the whole first half that’s the way it was.“We were absolutely ringing wet coming in at half-time and then the sun was out in the second half! But they bet us that year and I think that was one of the strongest teams we’ve ever had.“That year and the year against Mournabbey and Carnacon. We only got beaten by a point against Carnacon I think in the end. We were losing by seven points at half time and we actually came out in the second half and played unbelievably. We lost by a point in the end, we just left too much to do against them.Tracey shows her disappointment after the final whistle in the All-Ireland Senior Club semi-final against Inch Rovers in 2008. Picture credit: Pat Murphy / SPORTSFILE“Although I won’t be part of the team that wins an all Ireland club (really wanted that one), I know Sarsfields have that in them and I’ll be there all the way cheering them on,” Tracey laments.While looking back, Tracey also looks forward for the future of ladies football, and focuses on what success involves for those young players now coming through the ranks.“I think girls need to listen. One day we were doing a recovery session and we just ran for 30 minutes without stopping, and that was a recovery session.“It’s just the mindset. Sometimes it feels like players are a little bit entitled now. I know people who have said to me if I was involved in training teams now I’d go mad at some of the girls.“I’m such a competitive person that if someone wasn’t doing something I would be like, ‘What are you doing? Why are you not giving it 100 percent?’ I’m that type of person and that’s not going to be for everyone, it’s just a personality thing.“I think players should listen to their coaches more and trust them that they’re doing the right thing. I would never have questioned my coach or said, ‘no I’m not doing that’. I just said that I’d do whatever it took because you wanted to win.“One day under Goggy we were doing a recovery session and we just ran for 30 minutes without stopping, and that was a recovery session.“I would love to see it being more in line with the men as well. I know it’s getting more coverage but it’s not really getting more support. I’m so bad though as well, it’s up to people like me that have played to go to all the games and get involved and getting out and supporting them.At the launch of the 2012 TG4 Ladies Football Championships at Croke Park. Picture credit: Stephen McCarthy / SPORTSFILEAs for Laois? Tracey says: “I’d love to see Laois back and doing well and winning Leinster finals.“It’d be great for the people involved and see that young group of girls take it by the scruff of the neck and get back to senior level. Even in the next 10 years because I know it doesn’t happen overnight.”“Just go out there and give it 100 percent instead of thinking, ‘Just because I’m good I should be there’.” Not just be there to say, ‘I’m playing with Laois,’ but to actually give it 200 percent of their effort and time.”One thing is for certain, Tracey has certainly given Laois 100 percent of her skill, effort and time over countless years. For that, Tracey, we thank you.SEE ALSO – Leinster Final Memory: Laois denied by Westmeath and Páidí in 2004 Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival date RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Women in Sport: All-Ireland winner and four-time All-Star – Laois football great Tracey Lawlor Electric Picnic Facebookcenter_img Home Sport Women in Sport: All-Ireland winner and four-time All-Star – Laois football great… SportWomen in Sport Electric Picnic As part of our Women in Sport interview series, this piece originally featured on LaoisToday in March 2019. An All-Ireland winner, four All-Star awards, four Leinster senior county medals and countless club honours both within Laois and in Leinster – Tracey Lawlor’s record reads like a dream for any young footballer.However with dreams there is heartbreak, and with victory there are sacrifices – all of which Tracey has experienced over the course of her 30 year footballing career.Tracey admits that she wasn’t the most spectacular or skillful player in her early playing days.“Paul [Tracey’s twin brother] was always the really skillful one growing up.“I was kind of like the one who worked really hard and did the horrible work. He had all the skill and I was always like, ‘I hope I grow up to be as good as him’.”So Tracey might not have been born one of the best – she simply made herself one of the best. Tracey holds the record for the top all-time scorer in county finals, earning 4-65 (77 points) within 13 games.She also holds the record for the top scorer in any one final – gathering 2-7 in 2014 against Timahoe. On the list of top six scorers in any one final, Tracey appears three times. Despite these achievements, Tracey has never won the Laois senior ladies footballer of the year. WhatsApp News Bizarre situation as Ben Brennan breaks up Fianna Fáil-Fine Gael arrangement to take Graiguecullen-Portarlington vice-chair role WhatsApp Pinterest Facebook By LaoisToday Reporter – 21st March 2020 last_img read more

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Tras 41 días, Kim Jong Eun hace una aparición pública y…

first_img Entire border patrol unit in North Hamgyong Province placed into quarantine following “paratyphoid” outbreak North Korea tries to accelerate building of walls and fences along border with China Kim Jong Eun hizo una aparición pública después de 41 días,en la que se le pudo ver caminando con la ayuda de un bastón y sin mayorproblemas. El periódico Rodong Sinmun mostró imágenes en la que se ve aKim Jong Eun inspeccionando el recientemente construido Distrito Residencial deCientíficos Wisong, en Pyongyang, apoyándose de un bastón con la manoizquierda. Las fotografías muestran al líder norcoreano sonriendo ampliamenteal tiempo que realizaba labores de supervisión en terreno, y también posandopara una fotografía conmemorativa junto a los científicos, quienes pronto semudarán a sus nuevas residencias. La desaparición de Kim Jong Eun de la luz pública dio lugara una serie de rumores. El líder había sido visto por última vez el día 3 delpasado mes de septiembre, durante un concierto de la banda Moranbong (una bandamusical femenina de Corea del Norte), y no fue visto por 41 días. Las teorías sobre el estado de su salud empezaron a aparecerel día 8, cuando participaba en un servicio para conmemorar los 20 años delfallecimiento de Kim Il Sung, ocasión en la que vio por primera vez quecojeaba. Tras esto, su desaparición durante 40 días provocó la aparición de unaserie de especulaciones: desde que se encontraba prisionero, hasta rumores deque tenía problemas de salud, como muerte cerebral; incluso se habló de unposible golpe de estado. Kim Jong Eun se habría apresurado para volver al ámbito públicocon el fin de disipar rumores, pese a que aún no se ha recuperado y debeapoyarse en un bastón. Ningún gran líder norcoreano había sido visto en talescondiciones (por ejemplo, usando un bastón), por lo que este hecho refuerza lateoría previamente señalada. Además, dado que la información se extiende muchomás rápidamente por el país que antes, la apresurada reaparición del lídersería para calmar la ansiedad e impedir el malestar en la ciudadanía.Anteriormente, Daily NK había informado sobre rumores de que Kim Jong Eun habíasido operado del tobillo izquierdo. Es posible que el hecho de que Kim Jong Eun haya escogido elDistrito Residencial de Científicos Wisong como lugar de regreso tras sudesaparición de 40 días (pese a que aún no se ha recuperado del todo), se debaa un intento por mostrar una imagen más cercana a los inminban (unidadesvecinales de Corea del Norte). Al respecto, un oficial gubernamental de Coreadel Sur expresó que “esto muestra una línea política de conseguir desarrollonuclear y económico”, además de agregar que “podemos imaginar que eligió estelugar porque él propuso la construcción de este sitio, cuyos resultados semostraron satisfactorios”.  Por otro lado, de acuerdo a una fuente cercana a Corea delNorte, existen tres posibilidades con respecto a la salud de Kim Jong Eun: (1)gota, (2) lesión en el tobillo, o (3) fascitis plantar (una inflamación en laplanta del pie). Sin embargo, también comunicó que no se ha podido confirmarcon precisión ninguna de estas teorías. Han habido análisis entre algunos especialistas de la saludacerca de los riesgos cardíacos a los que la gota podría conducir,especialmente dado el historial de infartos de miocardio presente en la familiade Kim Jong Eun (Kim Il Sung y Kim Jong Il sufrieron infartos), por lo quetambién el gobierno surcoreano está siguiendo de cerca el asunto. En caso de que se trate de una lesión al tobillo, la razónsería que “(Kim Jong Eun) se lesionó al jugar baloncesto”, o bien “se lesionóal realizar una demostración durante un entrenamiento militar”. El gobierno deCorea del Sur, por su parte, creería que el líder recibió tratamiento médico enambas piernas, debido a la cojera que presenta en la pierna derecha y en laizquierda. By Daily NK – 2014.10.16 12:02am News Facebook Twitter News News AvatarDaily NKQuestions or comments about this article? Contact us at [email protected] RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR News SHARE Image: Yonhap There are signs that North Korea is running into serious difficulties with its corn harvest Tras 41 días, Kim Jong Eun hace una aparición pública y disipa rumoreslast_img read more

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Ford to reportedly introduce car-based pickup in 2021

first_img Will buyers of small Ford cars cotton to a modern-day Ranchero? If the rumoured timeline is correct, we shouldn’t have a long wait to find out. Trending in Canada See More Videos Trending Videos advertisement RELATED TAGSFordPickup TruckNon-LuxuryNew VehiclescourierfiestafocusFordNon-Luxuryranger We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information. In the midst of Bronco and Bronco Sport leaks, a report has surfaced Ford will build a unibody pickup truck to fill the yawning chasm left at the entry-level end of its range after unceremoniously dumping the Focus and Fiesta.Dealers who attended a recent product planning meeting say the company showed them a vehicle that would, in terms of price, sit in the white space that currently exists in the sub-$20,000 (USD) end of their showrooms, says Automotive News.Sources described it as a rig whose sides will be familiar to anyone who’s seen an old-school Ranger pickup. This suggests sides flatter than the Prairies. New Ford Bronco and Bronco Sport images leak on enthusiast forumsPlease stop us if you’ve heard this before. A decade ago, when the collective Blue Oval brain trust was busy jettisoning the original Ranger from Ford showrooms, suits were trying to push buyers of that pickup into Focus and Fiesta cars. “Today, a lot of customers who buy Rangers are the people who use it as a commuter vehicle,” Derrick Kuzak, a Ford veep, told PickupTrucks.com at the time. “But with the new Ford Fiesta and Focus coming into the lineup, those kinds of customers will have other alternatives to the Ranger.”Yeah. And how well did that work? The Focus and Fiesta are gone, as are most of their customers, decamped for other automakers. Now, Ford is trying to pull the same trick — except in reverse. Those same dealers report the vehicle will be assembled at Ford’s plant in Mexico, a facility which currently churns out the dead-man-walking Fusion and Lincoln MKZ. Estimates of 100,000 annual sales were being bandied about, with apparent confirmation this thing will be sold in both America and Canada.Ford had a similar model forty years ago called the Courier and, with retro names popping up like so much southern kudzu, it’s wholly possible it’ll trot out this model designation when the vehicle appears in 2021. If estimates are correct, it’ll ride on the Focus platform and be targeted not just at shoppers of small trucks but also those seeking cheap transportation — a job formerly held by the Focus and Fiesta.RELATED The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car ever COMMENTSSHARE YOUR THOUGHTS ‹ Previous Next › Ford is reportedly building a Bronco-based pickup truck Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2 The last Ford Ranger pickup truck built in North America rolled off the assembly line Dec. 16, 2011, at Ford’s historic Twin Cities Assembly Plant in St. Paul, Minn. More than 7 million Rangers have been built since production began in 1982 at a Ford factory in Louisville, Ky. The last U.S.-built Ranger will find a home with Orkin Pest Control, which has purchased thousands of Rangers for its fleet since 1983. The end of Ranger production also signifies the last vehicle to be built with Ford’s famous “Cologne” V6, ending 49 years and more than 25 million units of production. (12/16/2011) Buy It! Princess Diana’s humble little 1981 Ford Escort is up for auction An engagement gift from Prince Charles, the car is being sold by a Princess Di “superfan” PlayThe Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car everPlay3 common new car problems (and how to prevent them) | Maintenance Advice | Driving.caPlayFinal 5 Minivan Contenders | Driving.caPlay2021 Volvo XC90 Recharge | Ministry of Interior Affairs | Driving.caPlayThe 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning is a new take on Canada’s fave truck | Driving.caPlayBuying a used Toyota Tundra? Check these 5 things first | Used Truck Advice | Driving.caPlayCanada’s most efficient trucks in 2021 | Driving.caPlay3 ways to make night driving safer and more comfortable | Advice | Driving.caPlayDriving into the Future: Sustainability and Innovation in tomorrow’s cars | Driving.ca virtual panelPlayThese spy shots get us an early glimpse of some future models | Driving.ca last_img read more

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Ayurvedic cancer drug ‘Kudos CM 9’ launched

first_img Comments (1) By EH News Bureau on February 5, 2019 Share Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals releases first “Comprehensive Textbook of COVID-19” Fastidious respond in return of this query with genuine arguments and telling the whole thing on the topic of that. Read Article Hye Mascorro 1 year Cancer Care News Patient Safety Researched by GoI’s Ministry of Science & Technology, CSIR-IICB, the drug is beneficial in both benign and malignant tumour treatmentAyurvedic cancer Drug ‘Kudos CM 9’ was launched in New Delhi. Developed by Government of India’s, Ministry of Science & Technology, (Council of Scientific & Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology) CSIR-IICB, the drug was launched on World Cancer Day.“Kudos CM9 is the result of 30 years of extensive research by Govt. of India’s Ministry of Science & Technology, CSIR-IICB to find the first ever ayurvedic cancer cure drug which has no side effects and has been proven to be the most effective and the safest medicine for the dreadful disease cancer,” said Prof Chitra Mandal, Senior Scientist, Cancer Biology & Inflammatory Disorder Division, CSIR- IICB.Kudos CM 9 is beneficial in both benign and malignant tumour treatment. It is very highly useful in curing early stage / early diagnosed cancer patients and in controlling further spread of cancer growth in patients undergoing chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormone therapy also prevents relapse of cancer.“Kudos CM9 helps to fight cancer by blocking certain cancer promoting enzymes and hormones. Kudos CM9 helps to prevent cancer in high risk individuals. The drug also possesses antimutagenic, chemoprotective and radioprotective properties,” explained Dr Priyanka, CEO, Kudos Ayurveda . Related Posts MaxiVision Eye Hospitals launches “Mucormycosis Early Detection Centre” Council of Scientific & Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Chemical BiologyCSIR-IICBKudos CM 9 Add Comment Menopause to become the next game-changer in global femtech solutions industry by 2025 WHO tri-regional policy dialogue seeks solutions to challenges facing international mobility of health professionals The missing informal workers in India’s vaccine story Ayurvedic cancer drug ‘Kudos CM 9’ launched Heartfulness group of organisations launches ‘Healthcare by Heartfulness’ COVID care app Phoenix Business Consulting invests in telehealth platform Healphalast_img read more

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ACI Cumballa Hill Hospital launches ‘The Pink Project’

first_img Share Related Posts WHO tri-regional policy dialogue seeks solutions to challenges facing international mobility of health professionals Phoenix Business Consulting invests in telehealth platform Healpha Comments (0) Menopause to become the next game-changer in global femtech solutions industry by 2025 ACI Cumballa Hill HospitalDr Dhairyasheel SavantThe Pink Project News Heartfulness group of organisations launches ‘Healthcare by Heartfulness’ COVID care app MaxiVision Eye Hospitals launches “Mucormycosis Early Detection Centre” Add Comment ACI Cumballa Hill Hospital launches ‘The Pink Project’ Read Article Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals releases first “Comprehensive Textbook of COVID-19” Spreads awareness regarding breast cancerACI Cumballa Hill Hospital has come up with a unique social campaign ‘The Pink Project’ to help women get rid of fears and myths regarding breast cancer and benign breast diseases. The campaign will be beneficial for women as it will help them understand about breast cancer and the importance of timely treatment.Dr Sanjay Sharma, HOD of Breast Cancer Department, Asian Cancer Institute, highlighted, “The commonest age group for breast cancer presentation in India is 40-55. Breast self-examination is a vital screening tool with a regular physical examination by doctor and mammography for early detection is required for successful treatment. The sole motto of this campaign is to spread awareness regarding breast cancer and benign breast diseases via a comprehensive clinic that will be launched soon. Thus, women should take time out of their erratic schedules, and be proactive and visit the doctor if they spot unusual signs and symptoms of breast cancer like a lump in the breast and nipple retraction.”Dr Dhairyasheel Savant, Consultant Surgical Oncologist, and Reconstructive Surgeon, ACI Cumballa Hill Hospital, Mumbai, said, “There is a lot of misinformation about breast cancer. The community lectures and screening camps conducted via campaign will allow women to address their breast issues at the right time without fear. All the services to tackle breast cancer and benign breast diseases will be provided under one roof. The message is that women should not be afraid of breast cancer of lumps. Every breast lump is not breast cancer. Those who have a family history of breast cancer should be careful and vigilant. The best protection is early detection.” By EH News Bureau on February 27, 2020 The missing informal workers in India’s vaccine storylast_img read more

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Deputy shot in off-duty attack remembered at LA funeral

first_imgHomeNewsCrimeDeputy shot in off-duty attack remembered at LA funeral Jun. 25, 2019 at 5:15 amCrimeNewsObituaryDeputy shot in off-duty attack remembered at LA funeralAssociated Press2 years agoCathedral of Our Lady of the AngelsDeputy Joseph SolanoDmitry KoltsovJenn BartickLos Angeles County sheriff’s deputyRhett Nelson A Los Angeles County sheriff’s deputy shot in an off-duty attack was remembered Monday as an inspiration to his family and colleagues for his positive attitude and devotion to public service.Mourners including hundreds of law enforcement members packed the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels for the funeral of Deputy Joseph Solano.A Utah man, Rhett Nelson, has been charged with two counts of murder in the ambush deaths just an hour apart of Solano and Dmitry Koltsov, a renowned Russian snowboarder. Nelson, who is being held without bail, has yet to enter a plea and is due back in court on July 22. His attorney, Jenn Bartick, has declined to comment. Police haven’t identified a motive for the seemingly random attacks June 10.“Joseph was a one of a kind man who took care of others before himself,” Solano’s longtime girlfriend Julianna Loza said during her eulogy. The couple had just purchased their dream house and Solano spent his free time compiling notes for his next home improvement project, she said.Despite his dangerous job, Solano inspired Loza by remaining upbeat and focusing on the positive things in his life, like his mother, son and stepdaughter, she said.“He always had a way of comforting me and reassuring me that everything was going to be all right,” Loza said.Sheriff’s Captain Tania Plunkett said Solano kept his fellow deputies smiling with his one-liners and confident demeanor, earning him the nickname J.C. — or Joe Cool.“He was full of life, he loved his family and everyone around him,” Plunkett said.Kolstov, 31, competed for years at Russian snowboarding championship meets and international competitions, the Los Angeles Times reported Monday.He was skateboarding with friends in downtown Los Angeles when a man drove up and shot him in the head without provocation, police said. After shooting Kolstov, Nelson drove several miles east to suburban Alhambra and shot Solano while the off-duty deputy waited in line at a Jack in the Box restaurant, investigators said.Authorities also suspect Nelson of committing two armed robberies in Long Beach. Separately, police in San Diego County say they suspect him in five armed convenience store robberies.Nelson’s family has said he suffers from mental illness and an opiate addiction. His family reported him missing last month when he left their Utah home with a firearm and said he wanted to “make it on his own or die,” according to St. George, Utah, police. His family told police they did not believe he was suicidal or a danger to others at the time.Solano, 50, died at a hospital two days after being shot.Friends of Koltsov have been raising money to send his remains to his family in Moscow, the Times said.Koltsov first rode a skateboard at the age of 14 and quickly became integral to Moscow’s fledgling skate scene, according to a statement provided to the Times from his sister, Marfa Koltsova. He worked with some friends to create Limited Skate Division, a do-it-yourself skate park in Moscow modeled after a similar venue in Portland, Oregon, she said.Koltsov began competing in international snowboarding in 2006, according to the International Ski Federation. He placed third in the big air snowboarding competition at the 2010 Russian national championships. Two years later, he earned a silver medal during a halfpipe competition in Switzerland, according to the federation.He moved to Southern California in 2015 hoping to stay involved in the skate and snowboarding scenes without the pressures of trying to compete on a world stage, friends said. Since arriving, Koltsov had become something of an ambassador to other well-known Russian skaters and snowboarders visiting the area, said Kalil Hammouri, who lived with Koltsov for several years.“He was almost like an unofficial coach to all the Russian competitive skateboarders. They would come here for competitions and he would house them, feed them and make sure they got where they needed to go,” said Hammouri, 28.Tags :Cathedral of Our Lady of the AngelsDeputy Joseph SolanoDmitry KoltsovJenn BartickLos Angeles County sheriff’s deputyRhett Nelsonshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentCRIME WATCH – Tuesday, June 25, 2019Doctor: Stabbing by Navy SEAL could have killed prisonerYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall8 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson19 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter19 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor19 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press19 hours agoNewsWedding boom is on in the US as vendors scramble to keep upAssociated Press19 hours agolast_img read more

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Charlier given top job at Digicel

first_img Tags Orange ordered to pay Digicel €250M in Caribbean case Chris joined the Mobile World Live team in November 2016 having previously worked at a number of UK media outlets including Trinity Mirror, The Press Association and UK telecoms publication Mobile News. After spending 10 years in journalism, he moved… Read more Previous ArticleFormer Ingenu chief resurfaces at CoreKinectNext ArticleDT warns Huawei ban could cause 5G chaos AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 29 JAN 2019 Related Chris Donkin Digicel chief executive quits Author Digicel gets green light for debt cut plan Digicel Group appointed former Veon chief Jean-Yves Charlier (pictured) as its CEO, following the death of predecessor Alexander Matuschka von Greiffenclau last month.Charlier was appointed to the operator group’s board in September 2018 as executive vice chairman.Former boss von Greiffenclau had been in charge since February 2018 and took over from long-term CEO Colm Delves, who stepped down after 13 years at the helm.Digicel Group is headquartered in Jamaica and operates in 31 markets across the Caribbean, Central America and Asia Pacific. It has 14 million customers across its media and communications services, and is in the process of restructuring the business under its Digicel 2030 Global Transformation Programme.Chairman Denis O’Brien said: “As we continue to build Digicel for the future with the power of digital firmly at the core of our ambitions, Jean-Yves is the natural leader for our business. His impressive track record leading some of the industry’s major providers – coupled with his vision and pragmatism – make him the ideal choice for the next stage of our journey.”Charlier resigned from Veon in March 2018 after three years as its CEO, overseeing its rebrand from Vimpelcom following a bribery scandal in Uzbekistan. Prior to his stint at Veon, he was CEO of French operator SFR and previously worked at media company Vivendi. Subscribe to our daily newsletter Back Home Charlier given top job at Digicel DigicelJean-Yves Charlierlast_img read more

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first_imgMeyer replied by noting that Marshall’s proposal goes against everything we’ve learned about how actual biological systems work, and thus must be regarded as entirely speculative and counter to the facts of biology. He also questioned the coherence of Marshall’s proposal by noting that dGRNs function as control systems and that control systems by definition specify outcomes both spatially and temporally. He argued that postulating a biological control system that doesn’t specify outcomes (i.e., is malleable) is really a contradiction in terms. What, he asked, would the role of a gene regulatory network have been if it was not constraining the timing of the expression of networks of genes to insure proper body plan development? Thus, Meyer questioned whether Marshall’s proposal of a labile or malleable dGRN was even coherent. Meyer critiqued both these proposals, noting that known examples of self-organization produce simple, redundant order but not the kind of complex and specified information (or the digital code) we see in life. Meyer also pointed out that Darwin’s Doubt evaluated many self-organizational scenarios, such as developmental patterning modules, but that inevitably “complexity depends on prior informational complexity,” and thus does not explain the origin of that information. In Meyer’s words, Marshall is “helping himself to informational endowments that make those processes possible.” Fourthly, Meyer noted that Marshall’s proposed “rewiring” of gene regulatory networks itself requires an infusion of new information. In particular, it would have required a whole host of coordinated genetic mutations (to various regulatory regions in the genome), requiring significant informational inputs. (This need to generate multiple coordinated mutations would have faced many of the problems faced by evolutionary mechanisms which Meyer discusses in Chapter 12 of Darwin’s Doubt.) As he had done in his review, Marshall again insisted that it was entirely possible that dGRNs were more flexible in the past, and that an ur-animal, an original form of animal life, evolved into the various animal forms that arose in the Cambrian period with their distinct body plans. If we frame Marshall’s views in terms of fitness landscapes, he essentially believes that this ur-animal sat at the bottom of a valley surrounded by perhaps an entire range of adaptive peaks, where it could easily evolve in virtually any direction. Meyer also pointed out that experiments on developmental gene regulatory networks in actual animals have repeatedly shown that perturbing the central components of these networks have catastrophic consequences for animal development. Meyer noted that there is no empirical support for the idea that dGRNs could have been labile in the past. Meyer made this same point in his response to Marshall review. In support of this claim, Meyer cited the work of Eric Davidson, whom Marshall had earlier accused Meyer of neglecting in his discussion of how body plans are built. Charles is actually revealing that he has some deeper metaphysical commitments of his own. The move he made in the review, where he said “these developmental gene regulatory networks, yes they can’t be perturbed but they must have been perturbed in the past,” what he ends up doing there is he ends up jettisoning basic principles of the historical scientific method where we are enjoined to look for causes now in operation. Since we don’t have causes in operation that can produce the kind of complexity that we need to build a body plan — the informational complexity, the circuitry, etc. — we say well maybe things could have been different in the past. And I think what that [reveals] is a prior commitment to at least methodological materialism.And what we’re doing in the ID movement is saying “Hey, let’s not limit ourselves to just materialistic explanations. If we have the right kind of evidence — the kind of evidence which we know from experience always indicates the prior activity of a mind — let’s allow ourselves to consider that as a possibility, in part because it provides a better explanation, but it also may lead to real advantages for science, because if life is a designed system, it’s gonna look different, it will lead to different kinds of experiments. In an opening interview with host Justin Brierley at the beginning of the debate, Meyer took time to explain one of his main critical arguments against the creative power of the neo-Darwinian mechanism. In particular, he developed an illustration of a thief desperately trying to find by chance the correct combination to a ten-dial bike lock with a security guard rapidly approaching. Meyer used this illustration to explain why random mutational changes are overwhelmingly more likely to fail than to succeed in generating even a single functional gene or protein in available evolutionary time. Like Meyer’s hypothetical dial-spinning thief, the evolutionary process simply has too many possible sequences to search in the available time to have a realistic chance of generating a desired sequence — a new functional gene or protein — let alone the many functional genes and proteins that would be necessary to build a whole new animal form. Congratulations to Science Magazine for an Honest Portrayal of Darwin’s Descent of Man At the very end of the debate, Marshall tried to close with a new point — a “gotcha point” — regarding lysyl oxidase, a protein that Meyer had noted is necessary for building the hard exoskeletons of arthropods, which first arise in the Cambrian period. Marshall noted that this protein is found not only in arthropods, but also in other animals, including humans (vertebrates). On an evolutionary view, this would require the gene for lysyl oxidase to have arisen early in the branching of animals, and so it must have been present in the common ancestor of arthropods and humans. In Marshall’s view, this shows that such a gene must “preexist animals by a long shot.” Thirdly, Meyer pointed out that Marshall’s proposal assumed a Precambrian pre-adapted genome with many of the regulatory genes for building Cambrian animals. Meyer noted that this proposal also does not eliminate the need to account for the origin of the genetic information necessary to produce the Cambrian animals. Rather, it just pushes the problem of the origin of some of that information back into the Precambrian. I think Charles took my use of that protein out of context. I was simply showing that the organisms have parts lists, and that the parts lists have to be built by proteins. And I acknowledged that he wants to push the problem of the origin of information back into the Precambrian. He’s free to do that. But that is not solving the problem. That’s just begging the question.Notice the question that he didn’t answer, which is what is the origin of the genetic information necessary to build that protein? Some proteins he acknowledges arise with the Cambrian animals, that’s why he talks about the need for “genetic novelties.” Some he says must have preexisted them in this preadapted Precambrian gene set. And that I think is the fundamental scientific issue. What is the origin of genetic information? He doesn’t really answer that question. He just presupposes, but doesn’t explain, two sources of information, the information that arises in the Cambrian, and in the Precambrian.I want to say that that information problem which is unsolved within a materialistic framework has a ready and obvious solution because of what we know from experience about what it takes to generate information. And that’s intelligent design. Meyer had a ready response. After pointing out that he did not presuppose a 1980s gene-centric understanding of animal development, but that he had examined and discussed in Darwin’s Doubt the hypothesis that dGRNs played a major role in the evolution of animals, Meyer noted that Marshall’s proposal does not eliminate the need to explain the origin of genetic information. Specifically, he showed that Marshall’s proposal presupposed, but did not explain, several separate sources of pre-existing genetic information. “A Summary of the Evidence for Intelligent Design”: The Study Guide In the course of the conversation, Marshall did offer two possible explanations for the origin of new biological information. In response, Marshall argued that Meyer had been forced to shift ground by allowing that the biological information could have arisen in the Precambrian, rather than the Cambrian. Meyer readily acknowledged that information necessary to build the Cambrian animals might have arisen in the Precambrian period, but that did not solve the central problem posed by Darwin’s Doubt — which is the problem of the origin of that information, not precisely when it originated. Meyer noted several times that Marshall had simply pushed the problem of the origin of the necessary information back into the Precambrian, without offering any explanation for how that information had arisen. In wrapping up, the debaters reflected on what if anything the conversation had accomplished. I think that Marshall was correct in saying the parties ended right where they started. But Meyer was also correct in saying that that the debate was “clarifying.” In my view, it showed most importantly that Marshall, like other leading evolutionary theorists, presupposes, but does not adequately explain, the origin of the information necessary to build new forms of animal life. As Marshall argued in his review: Meyer concluded the debate with a ready rejoinder: Marshall and Meyer picked up this thread again at the very end of the conversation. Marshall insisted that it was unrealistic to expect that the dGRNs of modern animal phyla would tell us about how dGRNs operated in the deep past. In response, Meyer pointed out that Marshall’s position reversed the requirement of the historical scientific method as pioneered by Darwin and Lyell, both of whom insisted that our present knowledge of cause and effect should constrain our theorizing about the evolutionary past. Meyer said that Marshall’s willingness to jettison that principle reflected his own prior commitment to a materialistic worldview. (Marshall had previously, in his review and in the debate, accused Meyer of allowing his theistic perspective and motivation to color his analysis of the evidence.) Photo by Roman Ribaliov on Adobe StockPreviously I noted that Stephen Meyer and Charles Marshall participated in a radio debate over Darwin’s Doubt which was broadcast this past weekend. I highly recommend, listening to it. As I wrote yesterday, both participants conducted themselves well in what turned out to be an extremely interesting, civil and thoughtful exchange. Requesting a (Partial) Retraction from Darrel Falk and BioLogos During the debate, Marshall amplified this argument by claiming that Meyer’s argument presupposed an outdated “1980s model of the way genes operate” and that his book “confronted a different set of problems that hark back to an older age.” According to Marshall, biologists no longer believe that building the diverse forms of Cambrian animals would require evolving new genes (or, at least, many new genes). Instead, Marshall argued, again, that new body plans could be generated by rewiring networks of already-existing genes, especially those which are part of the developmental gene regulatory networks (dGRNs) that control the timing and expression of pre-existing genes during animal development. Marshall pointed out that animals have far fewer genes than we once expected, and that today it is thought that “animals use essentially the same genes, just deployed slightly differently.” By changing the deployment of those genes — by rewiring their dGRNs — Marshall thinks new body plans can arise. Casey LuskinAssociate Director, Center for Science and CultureCasey Luskin is a geologist and an attorney with graduate degrees in science and law, giving him expertise in both the scientific and legal dimensions of the debate over evolution. He earned his PhD in Geology from the University of Johannesburg, and BS and MS degrees in Earth Sciences from the University of California, San Diego, where he studied evolution extensively at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. His law degree is from the University of San Diego, where he focused his studies on First Amendment law, education law, and environmental law.Follow CaseyProfileWebsite Share A Physician Describes How Behe Changed His MindLife’s Origin — A “Mystery” Made AccessibleCodes Are Not Products of PhysicsIxnay on the Ambriancay PlosionexhayDesign Triangulation: My Thanksgiving Gift to All Thus, contra Marshall, Meyer didn’t “miss” the arguments of Davidson and others about dGRNs and hypotheses about rewiring preexisting networks of genes, nor did he critique a model of animal evolution that’s stuck “in the 1980s.” Rather, he discussed them, he confronted them, and he critiqued them. Because the debate lasts nearly an hour and a half, and is well worth listening to in its entirety, I thought it would be useful to provide a short guide to help listeners focus on the main argument of the debate and to follow the thread of that argument as it pops up again and again, amidst many other topics Origin of Life: Brian Miller Distills a Debate Between Dave Farina and James Tour Recall that in Darwin’s Doubt Meyer argues that intelligent design provides the best explanation for the origin of the genetic and epigenetic information necessary to build the novel forms of animal life that arise in the Cambrian period. In support of that argument, Meyer offered five separate critiques of the ability of the mutation/selection mechanism to generate that necessary information. He also later critiqued six post neo-Darwinian evolutionary mechanisms and made a positive argument for intelligent design by showing that intelligent agents alone have the power to produce large amounts of functionally specified digital information. Indeed, there are no examples of these deeply entrenched, functionally critical circuits varying at all. At the periphery of the hierarchy are gene regulatory networks that specify the arrangements for smaller-scale features that can sometimes vary. Yet, to produce a new body plan requires altering the axis and global form of the animal. This requires mutating the very circuits that do not vary without catastrophic effects. As Davidson emphasizes, mutations affecting the dGRNs that regulate body-plan development lead to “catastrophic loss of the body part or loss of viability altogether.” He explains in more detail: “There is always an observable consequence if a dGRN subcircuit is interrupted. Since these consequences are always catastrophically bad, flexibility is minimal, and since the subcircuits are all interconnected, the whole network partakes of the quality that there is only one way for things to work. And indeed the embryos of each species develop in only one way.” In fact, Meyer discussed the importance of Davidson’s work extensively in Chapter 13 of Darwin’s Doubt, which makes it odd that Marshall charged during the debate that Meyer “completely missed” this literature. As Meyer wrote: Marshall responded by saying “that’s a very good point” and acknowledged that he’s “not trying to deny” it. Evolution TagsBook News & EventsCambrian ExplosionCharles MarshallColleagues’ ResponsesDarwin’s DoubtResponse to Criticism,Trending First, he appealed to self-organizational processes in which altering a few simple rules can produce new complexity. Second, Marshall also invoked thermodynamics, noting how the earth is a closed system that is constantly bathed in sunlight, and this energy can create localized order and “explore improbabilities.” The debate also suggested to me — given Marshall’s status as one of the world’s leading Cambrian paleontologists and evolutionary biologists — that a strictly materialistic evolutionary approach has little left to offer with respect to that critical question. Despite his indisputable erudition concerning the Cambrian fossil record and evolutionary biology generally — clearly evident in the debate — Marshall was unable to offer a compelling explanation for the origin of new biological information and relied mainly on the same question-begging proposal that Meyer had already decisively rebutted in writing (see here). After listening to the debate, I was impressed with Charles Marshall the evolutionary biologist, the scientist, and the thinker, but was also left thinking that if his arguments about the origin of biological information were the best that mainstream evolutionary biology has to offer, then the future of biology definitely belongs to ID. Here’s what Meyer said in reply: Second, Meyer also noted that the developmental gene regulatory networks that Marshall emphasized were themselves made of genes and gene products and that Marshall had presupposed the existence, but not explained the origin, of these regulatory genes. Thus, overall, Meyer showed that Marshall’s proposal presupposed, but does not explain, the origin of several key sources of genetic information (and, I would add, that it does nothing to explain the origin of the epigenetic information that Meyer discusses in Chapter 14 of Darwin’s Doubt). Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share In the first place, Meyer cited some of Marshall’s own scientific papers to show that Marshall himself acknowledged the need for what Marshall called “gene novelties” — new genes — for building the specific anatomical structures (and parts) that characterize the Cambrian animals. (Meyer pointed out that building these animals would have required many so-called “taxon specific” genes that are known to be completely unique to specific animal forms.) Jane Goodall Meets the God Hypothesis In the course of the debate, Meyer and Marshall discussed many other issues: whether intelligent design would lead to fruitful new research; whether the case for intelligent design constituted a God–of–the–Gaps argument; and their own backgrounds and motivations for doing science and for developing their arguments and perspectives. Nevertheless, the debate did repeatedly return to the central argument of Meyer’s book concerning the origin of the information necessary to produce the Cambrian animals. After having written many responses to critics of Meyer’s book who have refused to address Meyer’s main information argument for intelligent design, I personally found Marshall’s willingness to engage the main argument of Darwin’s Doubt refreshing. One gets the sense listening to Marshall of a first rate scientific mind grappling with the real issues confronting evolutionary biology. [Meyer’s] case against the current scientific explanations of the relatively rapid appearance of the animal phyla rests on the claim that the origin of new animal body plans requires vast amounts of novel genetic information coupled with the unsubstantiated assertion that this new genetic information must include many new protein folds. In fact, our present understanding of morphogenesis indicates that new phyla were not made by new genes but largely emerged through the rewiring of the gene regulatory networks (GRNs) of already existing genes. Intelligent Design A Listener’s Guide to the Meyer-Marshall Radio Debate: Focus on the Origin of Information QuestionCasey LuskinDecember 4, 2013, 11:45 AM In his review of Darwin’s Doubt in Science, Marshall attempted to rebut this argument, not by demonstrating that any known evolutionary mechanism can produce the information necessary to build the Cambrian animals, but instead by contesting the idea that a significant amount of new genetic information would have been necessary to build these animals. In particular, Marshall claimed that the evolutionary process could have “rewired” the gene regulatory networks that control how other “already existing genes” are expressed during the process of animal development. 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Cash-Strapped Parks

first_imgHaving already grown accustomed to a dwindling budget in recent years, the National Park Service is now facing the prospect of a decade of across-the-board cuts starting at nearly 8 percent in 2013 plus a cap on discretionary spending that will be in effect from 2012 through 2021. What this could mean is shorter seasons at some national parks, staff reductions, deferred infrastructure maintenance, campground closings, reduced amenities and, perhaps, increased real estate development within park boundaries, among other cost-cutting casualties, according to the National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA). In Northwest Montana, it means unavoidable impacts – in some form – on Glacier National Park, which a state tourism official calls the region’s “main economic driver.” And the threat of cuts comes at a time when Glacier is experiencing soaring visitation. “Across the park system, it is fair to say that superintendents will be forced to make tough decisions,” said John Garder, the NPCA’s budget and appropriations legislative representative in Washington DC. In November, the NPCA released a report stating that in fiscal year 2011 the National Park Service had funding reduced by $140 million, including $11.5 million for operations. Since 2002, the report states, the agency’s discretionary budget has decreased from $3 billion to $2.6 billion in today’s dollars. The NPCA is an independent organization established in 1919 to protect and enhance the national park system, according to its website, with headquarters in Washington DC, 25 regional field offices and more than 600,000 members and supporters. The organization’s report arrives at a time when the nation is mired in debate over how to trim the federal government’s deficit. The Budget Control Act of 2011, enacted in August, calls for cutting the deficit by roughly $900 billion through caps on discretionary spending beginning in 2012 and ending in 2021. Those spending caps will affect the national park system. The Budget Control Act also established a deficit-reduction supercommittee, which failed to meet its late-November deadline for devising a plan to trim the deficit by at least $1.2 trillion. The committee’s failure means Congress now has a year to agree on its own legislation before sequestration takes effect in 2013, setting off a decade of automatic cuts. If Congress fails, automatic 7.8 percent cuts to non-defense discretionary programs, including the National Park Service, will be implemented in 2013, according to the Congressional Budget Office. After that, these programs will endure cuts between 5.5 and 7.8 percent through 2021. Garder says about 90 percent of national parks’ budgets consist of fixed costs. “That means the superintendents have 10 percent control of their budgets,” Garder said. “You cut 8 percent and they have to make some deep and painful cuts.” Rhonda Fitzgerald, co-owner of Whitefish’s Garden Wall Inn and chair of the governor-appointed Montana Tourism Advisory Council, said Northwest Montana’s economy revolves around Glacier Park, in terms of both the visitors and permanent residents it attracts, including employers who set up business here. “Business in the county is driven tremendously by Glacier National Park directly,” she said. “It’s why people come here. They come here for Glacier. Every research project the state does tells us that.” “Anything that cuts back 8 percent from the park will have a huge impact on the economy,” she added. The National Park Service and other federal agencies are currently operating under a continuing resolution, a temporary funding measure set to expire on Dec. 16. At that point, agencies like the NPS hope to have a formal budget for fiscal year 2012. Denise Germann, Glacier National Park’s spokesperson, said the park anticipates “a minimum of a 3 percent decrease in funding for 2012.” Then if automatic cuts are enacted in 2013, Glacier will budget accordingly. “We anticipate there are going to be some changes,” Germann said. “It’s all unknowns right now. The reality is we will be dealing with less. We’ll do what we can with what we have.” Michael Jamison, the NPCA’s Crown of the Continent program manager, said the effects that national park cuts have on local economies far outweigh the relatively minimal savings the cuts have for the federal government. “We need to remember that the entire National Park Service is 1/13 of 1 percent of the federal budget,” Jamison said. “We are not going to balance the federal budget on the backs of the parks. There’s just not enough money there.” Like Fitzgerald, Jamison said there is ample research illustrating Glacier’s far-ranging impact on the region’s economy and warns against hurting the “goose that lays the golden egg.” He notes that cutbacks have already affected national parks in recent years. “Would our economic engine be hobbled in some way if we stop investing in it, if we stop feeding the goose?” Jamison said. “There’s a tipping point.” “We’ve already been seeing ongoing erosion but now we’re looking at more than erosion,” he added. “We’re looking at a full landslide. It needs to be part of the national conversation.” Andrew Hagemeier, who works with Jamison at the NPCA’s office in Whitefish, is conducting a study on “footloose businesses” and “travel stimulated entrepreneurial migrants,” meaning people who have chosen to set up their businesses in Northwest Montana because they want to live amidst the region’s natural amenities and recreational opportunities. Hagemeier is gathering input from business and community leaders throughout the Crown of the Continent at www.surveymonkey.com/pathwaystoprosperity.com, hoping to shed light on Glacier’s economic impact in terms of permanent employers rather than simply tourism dollars. “These protected areas, they mean a lot more to our local economies than just tourism dollars – they help to diversify and strengthen our local economies,” Hagemeier said. “We need to recognize that they do that and take advantage of it, whether that’s through marketing and tourism promotion or whatever else.” Garder is concerned about the effect federal budget cuts will have on the Land and Water Conservation Fund, which provides money to purchase and protect sensitive areas, including private plots of land that go up for sale inside national parks. “If you have private property owners within the boundaries of a park and they want to sell their property, they are free to sell it to the highest bidder,” Garder said. “If the park service has money they can buy that property at a fairly appraised value.” The fund, Garder said, received a 25 percent cut in fiscal year 2011 and the immediate future looks bleak in the face of sequestration and spending caps. Garder notes that Montana Sens. Max Baucus and Jon Tester “have been at the forefront of the effort to maintain consistency for that fund.” Garder said there are 120 acres of riparian habitat along the Middle Fork of the Flathead River in Glacier Park for sale, listed at $1.2 million in the president’s budget. “Trophy mansions and subdivisions and ranchettes can go into those areas,” he said. “These developments have happened, so it is a real concern.” Jamison believes the funding dilemma has potential repercussions that, in Northwest Montana, can’t be measured in simple economic terms. “The park is who we are culturally and economically,” he said. “It’s how we make our living. It’s how we identify ourselves as a community.” Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. Emaillast_img read more

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