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Rush Continues 40th Anniversary Celebration In Virginia

first_imgListening to Rush perform live, it’s impossible to not search for extra musicians adding to the sound. So much precision and energy can’t possibly be coming from a three piece band! Nope – that’s just Geddy Lee, Alex Lifeson, and Neil Peart, setting the bar for all other rock musicians. Anyone starting out has surely learned a lesson or two from “YYZ.”This past Saturday, May 30th, Rush brought their 40th anniversary tour out to Jiffy Lube Live in Bristow, VA, and once again they continued to blow down the doors. In reverse chronological order, the band performed twenty-four songs during the course of the evening, including the first half of side one of their most well known album, 2112.The set list showcased their longevity as well as their musical diversity, and included material from their latest effort, Clockwork Angels (2012), all the way back to their humble beginnings, “Working Man” from their self-titled debut, Rush (1974). Progressively, their stage set up dwindled as they went through their sets, starting with the modern day laser light show, Marshall super stack set-up, to finally a red curtain backdrop with single guitar and bass rigs.“It’s hard to decide what to play each night when you do a tour like this,” exclaimed Geddy Lee as the band began their three hour performance.Sure, there were the standards such as “Tom Sawyer” and “Closer to the Heart,” but there was also the somewhat obscure additions like “Animate” and “Natural Science.” Geddy Lee proved to be almost ageless as his dynamic vocal range has lost little, if anything, over the past forty years.Collectively, the band effortlessly rumbled through two sets, proving in the process that they haven’t lost their chops and are still very much at the top of their game. Geddy Lee, Neil Peart, and Alex Lifeson are rock virtuosos that continue to be some of the very best at what they do.Setlist: Rush at the Jiffy Lube Live in Bristow, VA, May 30th, 2015Set I: The Anarchist, Clockwork Angels, Headlong Flight (w/ drum solo), Far Cry, The Main Monkey Business, One Little Victory, Animate, Roll The Bones, Distant Early Warning, SubdivisionsSet II:Tom Sawyer, YYZ, The Spirit of Radio, Natural Science, Jacob’s Ladder, Cygnus X-1 Book II: Hemispheres (Part I), Cygnus X-1 Book I: The Voyage (w/ drum solo), Closer To The Heart, Xanadu, 2112 (Parts I, II, IV, VII)Encore:Lakeside Park, Anthem, What You’re Doing, Working Manlast_img read more

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Harvick, Childers ready to tackle fresh ’17 challenges

first_img“Having a new manufacturer is probably the thing for me that’s the most exciting because there will be a lot of problems to solve, a lot of things that are going to be different. Working through those things with my team and organization is something I thrive on. I love the challenges that are presented.” “Now it’s down to bare frames; cut the clips off, making them where the Ford engine will fit. And you have to wait on NASCAR to give you certification dates to go get your (chassis) certified. Most organizations only get one or two a week; when you’ve got 75 race cars sitting there waiting to get certified, that’s taken a long time.” SHR fields teams for drivers Kevin Harvick, Kurt Busch, Danica Patrick and team newcomer Clint Bowyer. The organization, located in Kannapolis, North Carolina, will also field a NASCAR XFINITY Series program for the first time this season. A bigger concern is the loss of practice time – most race weekends will now include only one session instead of two the day before the race. “I think there’s a lot to motivate yourself with this year and I love those challenges.” RELATED: Phoenix unveils major renovation plan | Full test speeds AVONDALE, Ariz. – These are busy days for NASCAR teams, with the start of the 2017 season just weeks away. Before the switch, SHR teams purchased chassis and other pieces from Hendrick Motorsports. Now, those must be crafted in-house. “The machine shop is just turned upside down,” Childers said. “Not only are you learning to build your own cars and your own suspensions and that type of stuff but you’re trying to figure out the rules too, and how you need to build them. He said he relishes the opportunity afforded by a new manufacturer and a new race format. His confidence, he said, is no less because of the issues his team faces. But nowhere is it busier than Stewart-Haas Racing, where the four-team Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series organization is undergoing the move from fielding Chevrolet to Ford entries. The 2017 season is another season of opportunity. “Plenty to reach out and grab,” he said, “and keep yourself and your team motivated.” “I’ll be honest, I don’t think we’re where we need to be. We had so much wind tunnel time in the Chevrolet bodies. We knew every little detail of every little corner, every crease. Now it’s starting over and will take a while to get that part figured that out and get the downforce back to where it needs to be.”Harvick has won 12 times since he and Childers joined SHR prior to the 2014 season. He’s made it to NASCAR’s Championship 4 two of those three years and won the title in 2014. </p> A new points system that yields race bonus points at the end of individual stages and those that carry over into the playoffs means “you have to be greedy on a week-to-week basis in order to get those points because they’ll matter at the end,” he said. Friday practices aren’t helpful, Childers said, because the track is green and time is limited with teams switching from qualifying trim to race trim. No different than ’14, he said, when Harvick was part of a new team at SHR. Or last year when the group was labeled a “lame duck operation” because of the impending switch to Ford. Or the challenges faced when co-owner/driver Tony Stewart was sidelined. “You try to go and be fast, lead the most laps, that part hasn’t changed,” he said. “It’s been a huge change,” said Rodney Childers, crew chief Harvick’s No. 4 Ford. “Normally in the offseason you can take some cars, put new doors on them, put new quarter panels on them or a new nose and move on. You put the same truck arms, the same housing, the same lower control arms back under it. “I’m not saying we can’t do that,” he said, “but it’s going to take some time, I think.” “The thing that keeps me motivated about our sport are things that you can reach out and grab and motivate yourself with,” Harvick said during a break in testing Tuesday at Phoenix Raceway. “The thought and the process that goes into a new format and thinking about how it’s going to play out. With the transformation, success might come a bit slower. But most remain convinced it will come. Including Childers. Meanwhile back under the hood, Childers has taken a look at the format changes, but says his team won’t alter its approach. Without the changes, he said, it’s likely that the No. 4 team would have been “really, really good” in ’17. “You don’t have time to make things better,” Childers said. “You’ve got one 50-minute practice on Saturday; whoever is fastest in that practice is going to kill everybody because you just don’t have time to do anything.last_img read more

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With regular season title pressure off, Kyle Busch chases third Brickyard win

first_imgSPEEDWAY, Ind. – Kyle Busch walked around the Indianapolis Motor Speedway garage Friday afternoon feeling equal parts ambitious and already highly accomplished.The Joe Gibbs Racing driver locked down the 2019 Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series regular-season championship last weekend at Darlington Raceway – his second regular-season title in as many years. And the clinch comes a full week before the series’ regular-season finale, Sunday’s Big Machine Vodka 400 at the Brickyard (2 p.m. ET on NBC, IMS Radio and SiriusXM NASCAR Radio) at the 2.5-mile Indianapolis track.RELATED: Full Indianapolis scheduleBusch was third-fastest in the opening Xfinity Series practice Friday. He’ll suit up for opening Monster Energy Series practice Saturday morning. Qualifying will take place Sunday at 10:30 a.m. ET – the morning of the Brickyard 400.Although it was a lengthy and tight trophy battle between Busch and defending series champion Joey Logano for the regular season title, Busch set the standard from the get-go. He was the first driver to earn four victories (at Phoenix, Auto Club, Martinsville and the first Pocono race) and has a series-best 21 top 10s – including a record-tying 11 consecutive to start the season – to pair with 13 top-five finishes to date.The 2015 Monster Energy Series champion Busch won both the 2015 and 2016 Brickyard 400 races, joining four-time race winner Jimmie Johnson as the only two active drivers to have earned multiple wins here.This weekend, Busch will compete in both Indianapolis Motor Speedway races, including Saturday afternoon’s Indiana 250 NASCAR Xfinity Series race. Busch is a three-time Xfinity race winner at Indy – taking the trophy from the pole position in all three wins (2013, 2015 and 2016) – and his combined five wins in the two NASCAR series equals the most stock car victories at the track. NASCAR Hall of Famer Jeff Gordon won five Brickyard 400s.RELATED: JGR eyes royal sweep at IndyBusch said Friday during a break in Xfinity Series practice that having the regular-season title already wrapped up does allow a bit of breathing room for this particular race weekend.“Definitely way better to have it done,’’ Busch said. “Last year we didn’t have it done, so we had to points race and got it done (in the race).“This time around we don’t have to points race at all, we can basically just focus on what we need to focus on to try to win the race. So when you got to throw away a stage or something like that to set yourself up for the end of the race, you can do that.’’This sense of everything-to-gain is particularly bad news for Busch’s competition this weekend – and sets the tone for Busch’s fifth consecutive playoff run.Busch has won three or more races in 10 of his 15 full-time Monster Energy Series seasons. Twice he has hoisted eight trophies in a year – 2018 and 2008 – yet neither time did he get to celebrate with the season championship trophy.So in the midst of another chart-topping, regular-season championship year, Busch has set his eyes on navigating the 10-race playoffs. And, again, he’ll have the benefit of a hard-earned points cushion. The regular-season title – which he battled Team Penske’s Logano for – means an extra 15 points to start the playoff run. He also has a series-best 10 stage wins.Busch has won at all 10 playoff venues – although his win at Charlotte Motor Speedway last May was on the traditional 1.5-mile oval, not the new Roval road course used in the October playoff race.Twenty-one of Busch’s 55 career victories have come at playoff venues and he has multiple wins at Richmond (six), Dover (three), Texas (three), Phoenix (three) and Martinsville (two). However, Busch has earned only eight of those 21 wins during the playoff stretch of the season.Last year he led the playoff standings going into Phoenix – the next-to-last race of the year that decides which four drivers advance to the Homestead-Miami season finale – and capped that round with the victory at ISM Raceway.The four championship challengers finished 1-2-3-4 at Homestead  – Joey Logano, Martin Truex Jr., Kevin Harvick, and Busch. So, even after Busch’s amazing eight-win effort, Logano hoisted the Cup championship trophy.All the momentum Busch and his No. 18 JGR Toyota team rightly carry now will be useful both for practical purposes and motivational cache.This weekend, Busch is an absolute favorite to visit Indy’s historic Victory Lane – either in the Xfinity or Cup Series. Or both. And with the regular-season title locked up already, these races are about establishing a high team standard and putting the right foot forward.“It is what it is right now,’’ Busch said. “We could have eight or 10 wins right now if all things went our way, but it doesn’t ever seem like it does. So, we’ll just keeping working hard and doing what we need to be doing.“You know you can talk about championship runs and anything else right now, but the fact of the matter is it doesn’t matter. If you get crashed out or have things happen to you two races in a row, all those points go to nil. There’s too many things that can happen so you’ve just got to race it out.”last_img read more

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Responder Treats His Own Daughter in Fremont (Calif.) Crash

first_imgFREMONT, Neb. (AP) – An emergency worker who responded to Wednesday’s middle school bus crash in Fremont wound up treating his own daughter.Nine of the 55 students on the bus suffered minor injuries when a van hit the back of the bus stopped at a railroad crossing. The driver, 21-year-old Joshua Abraham of Elkhorn, was flown to an Omaha hospital, but no update on his condition was available on Friday.All the students were examined, treated and released on Wednesday.Jim Snyder with the Fremont Rural Fire Department told the Fremont Tribune (http://bit.ly/p2e2Mj ) he initially thought the bus might be empty when he approached the crash.“Then you pull up and you think, ‘Oh, this isn’t going to be good,’” said Snyder, who is the emergency medical services coordinator for the department.“This is something you can train and train for and never be prepared for,” he said.Snyder said most of the students were shaken up by the accident, and at least one girl was crying.Snyder initially checked a couple students who complained of neck and head injuries before he found out the bus was carrying students his daughter’s age. After asking, he learned his daughter, Katheryne, was sitting up front.Snyder’s daughter had a slight cut on her forehead from her glasses, but was otherwise OK and didn’t want to go to the hospital.last_img read more

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US Senate overwhelmingly rejects Sanders’ proposal to label GMO foods

first_imgby Anne Galloway May 27, 2013 vtdigger.org The Vermont House of Representatives was the first legislative body in the nation to move ahead with a proposal requiring the labeling of all genetically engineered foods this spring, and a number of other states are considering labeling legislation, but it looks like a congressional mandate could be a long way off.Monsanto, a company that has been in the forefront of genetic modification of food, has threatened to sue Vermont over the legislation.The U.S. Senate rejected an amendment from Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., last week that would have put a similar requirement in place nationwide. The vote was 27-71.‘Monsanto and other major corporations should not get to decide this, the people and their elected representatives should,’Sanders said in a statement.David Rogers of Politico reported that the Democratic leadership in the Senate is more sympathetic to labeling. A year ago both Sens. Harry Reid, D-Nev., and Chuck Schumer, D-NY, voted against a similar proposal. This time they both changed their votes in support of Sanders’amendment.According to Maplight, a national nonpartisan research website, found that companies that support the use of genetically engineered crops donated $1.2 million to Senate Political Action Committees from 2009 through March of this year.Fifty-four countries require labeling, according to Sanders. France, Peru, Ireland, Japan and Egypt have banned the import and export of genetically modified food.last_img read more

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With new Briarwood plans approved, demolition on existing building slated for August

first_imgThe new Briarwood building will have a secure entry and improved pick-up and drop-off infrastructure.With approval from the Prairie Village Planning Commission last week, the Shawnee Mission School District is preparing to move forward on the project to rebuild Briarwood Elementary School in Prairie Village.Though the site plans plans for the new school must still be signed off on by the city council, it’s expected that demolition of the existing Briarwood building will begin in August.The new school building is designed to accommodate 550 students, but flexible classroom space in the facility will allow it to take on an additional 105 students if necessary. Briarwood’s enrollment last year was just over 580 students.The final design put forward by the district calls for the demolition of the Briarwood gymnasium, a proposal that had caused some controversy earlier in the design process because of the $75,000 Briarwood parents raised just 10 years ago to help upgrade the then-new structure.Among the features of the new Briarwood building absent from the current structure are:Secure entryIncreased onsite parkingLarger drop off area that accommodates more vehicles and improves traffic circulationA science activity center and media centerA dedicated music room and a dedicated band/strings roomMoreover, the school will have larger primary classrooms that all have natural light.Briarwood students will be attending class at the Broadmoor Technical Center this coming school year as construction on the new building begins. The school is slated to be finished to allow students to begin attending classes there either at the start of the fall or spring semesters of the 2016-17 school year.An extended loop is intended to help improve traffic circulation.Interior renderings of the new school building.last_img read more

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Scientists use engineered phages to help save teen

first_imgA team of US and British scientists are reporting the successful treatment of a life-threatening mycobacterial infection using genetically engineered bacteriophages.In a case report published yesterday in Nature Medicine, the team describes the efforts to save a young cystic fibrosis patient in England struggling with a multidrug-resistant (MDR) Mycobacterium abscessus infection following a double lung transplant. It’s the latest in a handful of cases in which bacteriophages, the ubiquitous viruses that attack and destroy bacteria, have been used as a last-resort treatment for patients with MDR bacterial infections. But it’s the first using genetically engineered phages.Over a 7-month period, a cocktail of three bacteriophages was isolated and developed by scientists at the University of Pittsburgh from a library of more than 15,000 phages. And 6 months after the patient began receiving the cocktail, the infection has largely cleared.”We’re in uncharted territory, but the patient has done incredibly well, and I think we’re through the most serious part of the infection,” study co-author Graham Hatfull, PhD, a professor of biological sciences at the University of Pittsburgh, told CIDRAP News.A search for phages beginsAlthough the September 2017 lung transplant at London’s Great Ormond Street Hospital went well for 15-year-old Isabelle Carnell-Holdaway, the pre-existing infection with non-tuberculosis mycobacteria—which had been treated with antibiotics for 8 years—began causing problems soon after the surgery.The antibiotics had stopped working, and because she was taking immunosuppressive drugs to prevent rejection of the new lungs, her body was unable to fight the bacteria. The infection spread from the surgical incision to the liver and throughout the body, popping up in skin lesions on her arms and legs. No treatment options remained.That’s when James Soothill, MD, a microbiologist at the hospital, got in touch with Hatfull. The two had previously met at a conference on phage therapy, and Soothill, knowing of Hatfull’s work with bacteriophages, sent him an email describing the patient. There was also another cystic fibrosis patient at the hospital experiencing the same difficulties.”He said that they have these patients that have this particular profile, and he was curious—and I was curious—as to whether we might have phages that would infect them,” Hatfull said. “I’m not sure that either of us thought it was going to end up a therapy, but we were interested in it from a basic research question.”Hatfull had a lot of phages to choose from. He leads the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s SEA-PHAGES (Science Education Alliance Phage Hunters Advancing Genomics and Evolutionary Science) programs, which gives college students at more than 150 institutions around the world the opportunity to collect and perform genome sequencing on bacteriophages, which can be found in all sorts of environments, from soil to sewage to seawater. Hatfull has spent more three decades building this phage repository.Of the 15,000 bacteriophages in the collection, more than 10,000 target Mycobacterium smegmatis. And with the genomic data on 1,800 of these phages, Hatfull knew that a subset would attack other types of mycobacteria, including M abscessus. But because phages need to match the particular strain of bacterium there was more work to be done.”Different strains of Mycobacterium abscessus have different susceptibility to the different phages…so we needed the phages that would be specific to that particular strain in that particular patient,” he said.Once he received samples of the bacterial strains from the two patients, Hatfull and his team began their search. One of the patients died before they could find the right match. But they ultimately isolated three phages—named Muddy, ZoeJ, and BPs—with potential against Carnell-Holdaway’s strain (M abscessus subspecies massiliense). Muddy, discovered by a student in South Africa, efficiently killed the strain. But ZoeJ and BPs needed some genetic tweaking to make them more efficient killers.”If we wanted to use more than one phage, we needed to do something to convert some of the miserable-looking guys into something that would work efficiently, and we have engineering tools and strategies we can use to do genetic manipulation,” Hatfull explained. “We deployed those tools to get two more phages and get a cocktail of three.”After Hatfull and his colleagues in Pittsburgh completed the lengthy process of growing and amplifying the phages, then purifying and testing them to make sure there were no toxins and that the cocktail would be safe for intravenous (IV) use, the team of clinicians in London, led by Helen Spencer, MD, tried a topical test dose of the cocktail on Carnell-Holdaway’s incision in June 2018. IV therapy began the next day. She responded well, with no signs of adverse effects, and was sent home after 9 days. IV and topical treatment continued at home.After 6 weeks, the liver infection had cleared, and the surgical wound and lesions slowly disappeared over the following months. Only one or two of the lesions remain. Although the authors of the study cannot definitively say these improvements would have occurred without the phage therapy, they note that patients with similar conditions typically have high morbidity and mortality.The future of phage therapySteffanie Strathdee, PhD, co-director of the Center for Innovative Phage Applications and Therapeutics (IPATH) at the UC San Diego School of Medicine, says the case is exciting on a number of levels. “It’s the first use of genetically modified phages in a human being that was successful, and it’s the first Mycobacterium infection in a human that’s been treated with phages, and that means there’s promise that we could use phage therapy to treat tuberculosis at some point,” she said.For Strathdee, there’s also a personal connection. Her husband, Tom Patterson, PhD, was successfully treated in 2016 with a bacteriophage cocktail for an MDR Acinetobacter baumannii infection that had left him fighting for his life, and they’ve co-authored a book on the experience—The Perfect Predator. Patterson’s doctor and IPATH co-director Robert Schooley, MD, advised on Carnell-Holdaway’s case, and Strathdee was involved from the very beginning, communicating with Carnell-Holdaway’s mother throughout the treatment process.”I’m just really happy that my husband and I could be part of it in a small way, because there’s nothing better than knowing that the pain and agony that you and your family went through is paying off and saving other lives” she said.The question is what the future holds for phage therapy, which to date has been used only in individual cases. The specificity of phages, Hatfull says, is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, because phages act as “guided missiles” and attack only a particular bacterial strain, they don’t have some of the side effects of broad-spectrum antibiotics, which can foster the emergence of multidrug resistance and wipe out beneficial bacteria in the gut. The toxicity is also low, because phages aren’t chemicals and don’t target human cells.”The specificity is definitely our friend in terms of using phages in antimicrobial treatment,” Hatfull said.But specificity is also a problem, because phages that work for one strain of bacteria don’t necessarily work on other strains. Muddy, ZoeJ, and BPs, for example, don’t efficiently kill other M abscessus clinical isolates. “That’s really at the root of the problem of [not] having a broader and more generalizable therapy,” he said.But Strathdee says that, with the ability to genetically engineer phages, there’s the possibility that scientists can create phages that target more than one strain of a bacterial species. “If you could edit the genes to just be a little broader spectrum, that would be great,” she said. “We have a lot to learn still, but I think there’s great potential.”See also:May 8 Nature Med studyNov 16, 2017, CIDRAP News story “To save a life, doctors turn to bacteria-killing viruses”last_img read more

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Virtually Celebrate UNM-LA Graduates

first_imgUNM-LA News:The University of New Mexico-Los Alamos honors the Graduates of 2020 in an online Celebration, at losalamos.unm.edu/graduation2020/.The celebration includes video messages from the UNM-LA Chancellor, Dr. Cynthia Rooney; Director of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Dr. Thom Mason; President of The University of New Mexico, Dr. Garnett Stokes; and UNM-LA Dean of Instruction, Dr. Sharon Hurley.One page lists all graduates and their level of accomplishment, and there is a link to download a printable program.Graduating students are welcome to send pictures. The page with pictures will expand as more pictures are received.Finally, friends and family who might want to share best wishes with graduates are welcome to send a message to [email protected], and these messages will be posted on the “Well Wishes” page.last_img read more

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Gary Neville defends St Michael’s scheme

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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People Moves: CBRE, Cubex, Cushman & Wakefield and more

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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