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In brief

first_imgMoney Mondays offer helpThe Office of Human Resources will be offering a special series of “HARVie chats” on banking, benefits, investing, and other financial topics. Harvard staff are invited to visit http://harvie.harvard.edu/chats/upcomingchats.shtml to get information that may help in navigating through the current economic downturn.Those employees who have never used HARVie’s “chats” feature should make sure their Java is updated before logging on. To find out more about how the chats work, visit http://harvie.harvard.edu/chats/overview/shtml. The chats take place Mondays at noon. Coming up:Dec. 1, Ask a TIAA-CREF Investment Professional: A representative from one of Harvard’s investment fund providers will talk about managing money in a volatile market.Dec. 8, Ask a Vanguard Investment Professional: A representative from another of Harvard’s investment fund providers will discuss managing your money in today’s market.If you have difficulties logging on, contact [email protected], (617) 495-0511.HRES plans home-buying seminarHarvard Real Estate Services is holding a home-buying seminar on Dec. 4 from noon to 1:30 p.m. Titled “Home Buying Seminar & Obtaining a Mortgage: Tips to Assist You with This Process,” the program will be at 124 Mt. Auburn St., Room 3311. Feel free to bring a lunch. Registration is required. To register, e-mail [email protected] to offer flu vaccination clinics through NovemberHarvard University Health Services (HUHS) will conduct free vaccination clinics throughout November. The clinics will be open to the entire Harvard University community every Monday and Tuesday (noon-3 p.m.) at HUHS on the second floor of the Holyoke Center (Monks Library). Students must have their Harvard ID to receive the vaccination. More information on the flu can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/flu/.last_img read more

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first_imgOn Friday, singer-songwriter Sheryl Crow offered up a performance at Pilton, England’s long-running Glastonbury Festival.Crow worked through a series of fan-favorites including “If It Makes You Happy”, “A Change Would Do You Good”, “All I Wanna Do”, “Soak Up The Sun”, and “Everyday Is A Winding Road”, along with “Prove You Wrong” and “Still The Good Old Days”, which appear on her forthcoming Threads studio album.In mid-June, Sheryl Crow shared a music video for “Still The Good Old Days” featuring The Eagles‘ guitarist Joe Walsh. Over the weekend at Glastonbury, Crow’s touring bassist Robert Kearns handled Walsh’s verses, swapping off vocals with Sheryl. Crow opened things up by exclaiming, “So here’s the deal. I wrote this song with Joe Walsh about still having fun no matter how old you are.”Watch pro-shot video of Sheryl Crow performing “Still The Good Old Days” at Glastonbury below:Sheryl Crow – “Still The Good Old Days” – 6/28/2019 [Pro-Shot][Video: BBC Music]Crow’s Threads collaborative album, which is set for release on August 30th via Big Machine, will feature 17 tracks full of the music world’s favorite musicians including Don Henley, Keith Richards, Stevie Nicks, Jason Isbell, Chris Stapleton, Maren Morris, and more.Head to Sheryl Crow’s website for more information on her Threads release, tour dates, ticketing, and more.Setlist: Sheryl Crow | Glastonbury Festival | Pilton, England | 6/28/2019Set: If It Makes You Happy, A Change Would Do You Good, All I Wanna Do, My Favorite Mistake, Can’t Cry Anymore, Prove You Wrong, Best Of Times, Still The Good Old Days, Soak Up The Sun, Steve McQueen, Everyday Is A Winding Roadlast_img read more

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Michigan Sergeant Delivers Baby During Traffic Stop

first_imgA Michigan sheriff’s deputy said he pulled over a vehicle he spotted running through red lights and ended up delivering a baby. Wayne County Sheriff’s Sgt. Brian Glatfelter said he saw the sport-utility vehicle speed through several red lights late Saturday in Westland and he soon discovered a female passenger in the vehicle was in labor, the Detroit Free Press reported Monday. Glatfelter said he called emergency medical services and grabbed a first aid kit and gloves for himself and the driver, the baby’s father. “I told him, ‘We’re having this baby right here,’” Glatfelter said. “I was just trying to snap him out of it.” Glatfelter said “nature took its course” and the baby was born before paramedics arrived. “It kind of felt like when I was in the delivery room with my own kids. I was high-fiving the dad. The mom did all the work. I was just the guide,” he said. Police said the mother and newborn, whose names were not released, were doing well at Oakwood Hospital.last_img read more

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Volunteer Security Team Fires on Gunman in Texas Church

first_img“It’s extremely upsetting to see anyone committing violence,” he said. Sunday’s shooting in Texas was also the second attack on a religious gathering in the U.S. in less than 24 hours. On Saturday night, a man stabbed five people as they celebrated Hanukkah in an Orthodox Jewish community north of New York City. DeSarno also said the gunman had been arrested multiple times in the past but declined to give details. Britt Farmer, senior minister of the church, said, “We lost two great men today, but it could have been a lot worse.” WHITE SETTLEMENT, Texas (AP) – A man pulled out a shotgun at a Texas church service and fired on worshippers Sunday, killing two people before he was shot to death by congregants who fired back, police said. Authorities at a Sunday evening news conference praised the two congregants who opened fire as part of a volunteer security team at West Freeway Church of Christ in White Settlement. It was unclear if the two people who were killed were the two who shot at the gunman. “This team responded quickly and within six seconds, the shooting was over. Two of the parishioners who were volunteers of the security force drew their weapons and took out the killer immediately, saving untold number of lives,” said Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, who also hailed the state’s gun laws. An elder at the church told the New York Times that one of those killed was a security guard who responded to the shooter, calling him a dear friend. Officials have not released the names of the victims or the gunman. FBI Special Agent in Charge Matthew DeSarno said they’re working to identify the gunman’s motive, adding that he is “relatively transient” but had roots in the area. Gunman killed two worshipers before being shot by congregants “Places of worship are meant to be sacred, and I am grateful for the church members who acted quickly to take down the shooter and help prevent further loss of life,” Abbott said in a tweeted statement. Authorities said there were more than 240 parishioners in the West Freeway Church at the time of the shooting. In this still frame from livestreamed video provided by law enforcement, churchgoers take cover while a congregant armed with a handgun, top left, engages a man who opened fire, near top center just right of windows, during a service at West Freeway Church of Christ, Sunday, Dec. 29, 2019, in White Settlement, Texas. The footage was broadcast online by the church according to a law enforcement official, who provided the image to The Associated Press on condition on anonymity because the investigation is ongoing. (West Freeway Church of Christ/Courtesy of Law Enforcement via AP) Tinius said he didn’t know the gunman and that the shooting appeared to be random. Two people with minor injuries that were sustained while ducking for cover were treated at the scene, MedStar Mobile Healthcare spokeswoman Macara Trusty said. In a livestream of the church service, the gunman can be seen getting up from a pew and talking to someone at the back of the church before pulling out a gun and opening fire. Parishioners can then be heard screaming and seen ducking under pews or running as papers fly to the floor. White Settlement Police Department Chief J.P. Bevering said the gunman had sat down in a pew before getting up, taking out a shotgun and firing at a parishioner, who was killed. He said the church’s security team then “eliminated the threat.” It is not the first deadly shooting to take place at a church in Texas. In November 2017, Devin Patrick Kelley opened fire on the congregation at a church in Sutherland Springs, killing more than two dozen worshippers, before taking his own life. And in 1999, a gunman killed seven people in Wedgwood Baptist Church in Fort Worth before detonating an explosive device and killing himself. “He was trying to do what he needed to do to protect the rest of us,” said the elder, Mike Tinius. A woman who answered the phone at the West Freeway Church of Christ told the AP she could not answer any questions and that she was told to direct inquiries to authorities. Gov. Greg Abbott asked the state to pray for the victims, their loved ones and the community of White Settlement, about 8 miles (12 kilometers) west of Fort Worth. In this still frame from livestreamed video provided by law enforcement, churchgoers take cover while a congregant armed with a handgun, top left, engages a man who opened fire, near top center just right of windows, during a service at West Freeway Church of Christ, Sunday, Dec. 29, 2019, in White Settlement, Texas. The footage was broadcast online by the church according to a law enforcement official, who provided the image to The Associated Press on condition on anonymity because the investigation is ongoing. (West Freeway Church of Christ/Courtesy of Law Enforcement via AP) All contents © copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Veterans Treated by Community Health Centers Increases by 43%

first_imgThe research also reveals that in 2015, nearly 9 out of 10 health centers served veterans, a finding that suggests improved access to care for many in this vulnerable population. In 3 states – West Virginia, Maine, and Alaska – health centers served 1 in 20 veterans or higher, while in Vermont, health centers served over 1 in 10 veterans. Health centers serving veterans offer a wide range of services; in addition to primary medical care, 78 percent offer dental care, 83 percent provide mental health services, 21 percent offer substance abuse treatment, and virtually all health centers offer services that improve access to healthcare.MORE: Veteran Homelessness Has Dropped 50% Since 2010Today half of all health centers are certified by the Veterans Administration (VA) as Veterans Choice providers under the special program established by Congress to improve access to community-based health care for veterans facing long wait times or travel distances for services at VA facilities.“Community health centers have long and deep experience serving our nation’s veterans. As the Veteran’s Administration works to improve access to essential services through partnerships and collaborations, health centers are ready and able partners to meet the unique needs of those who have served our country,” said Feygele Jacobs, CEO and President of the RCHN Community Health Foundation, which funded the infographic.RELATED: Connecticut Becomes Second State to End Veteran HomelessnessDan Hawkins, Senior Vice President of Public Policy and Research at the National Association of Community Health Centers noted, “Veterans have given so much to their – and our – country, so community health centers are committed to providing the very best care to them every day. This has even more importance when you consider the fact that health centers are located in communities with many low-income vets but with few or no other care providers.”(Source: Milken Institute School of Public Health)Positivity Is Healthy: Click To Share With Your FriendsAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreThe number of veterans served by community health centers has increased dramatically from 214,000 to more than 305,000, a 43 percent increase in less than 10 years, according to an infographic produced by researchers at the Geiger Gibson/RCHN Community Health Foundation Research Collaborative, which is based at the George Washington University’s Milken Institute School of Public Health (Milken Institute SPH).last_img read more

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UHS administers flu vaccines to campus community

first_imgIn preparation for flu season, University Health Services (UHS) hosted their annual Flu Blitz on Tuesday through Thursday providing free influenza vaccines to prevent campus community members from falling sick in the midst of the fall semester.Director of UHS Sharon McMullen said this year the University administered approximately 6,450 flu vaccines to students, retirees, staff and dependents, over the course of three days in the Stepan Center.The public health initiative is a joint effort between UHS and the Division of Human Resources to protect people from contracting the flu and lessening its symptoms if infected.“Avoiding influenza is important, especially on a college campus, where illnesses can spread easily due to our close proximity to each other, and because getting sick with the flu can interrupt a student’s academic progress,” McMullen said.While the CDC recommends getting the flu vaccine every year to reduce the risk of flu complications that can lead to hospitalization or even death, they also urge everyday preventative actions to slow the spread of germs that cause respiratory illnesses like the flu. When most people in a community are vaccinated, McMullen said it becomes more difficult for the flu to spread in general, so flu shots help more than just the individual receiving the vaccine.“The annual Flu Blitz is yet another opportunity to build community in true Notre Dame fashion,” McMullen said.Having a large percentage of people in a community vaccinated also enables herd immunity, which helps protect immune-compromised individuals who cannot receive vaccinations.In order to be most effective, UHS times the Flu Blitz specifically, so students, staff and faculty are protected throughout the entirety of flu season. UHS Health IT Specialist, Neal Connolly, who was the Flu Blitz Manager this year, said the influenza vaccine is typically effective for about six to eight months after vaccination.“So anyone who was vaccinated at our event should be covered until roughly April — which is typically the end of the flu season,” Connolly said.As UHS director, McMullen said she served as executive sponsor of Notre Dame’s annual Flu Blitz while also helping out giving vaccines.“I even had the chance to go back to my roots as a registered nurse and to administer vaccines, including to vice president of student affairs, Erin Hoffmann Harding,” McMullen said.UHS not only holds the Flu Blitz for easy access to the flu vaccine to community members, but McMullen said they also consider the event an annual drill for emergency preparedness.“If our campus ever experiences a need for large-scale administration of medication, for example in a meningococcal meningitis outbreak, we’ll be ready, thanks to the structure of our Flu Blitz,” McMullen said. “Some of the emergency management elements we intentionally include are clear chain of command, separate ingress and egress, point-of-care documentation, efficient throughput, epi ‘hotwash’ debriefing session and collaboration with campus and local partners.”In addition, every year UHS rotates the leadership positions of the Flu Blitz among staff members to build depth of emergency management experience and to offer professional development, McMullen said.For students, the Flu Blitz may also serve as a learning experience.“We use this opportunity to engage the academy,” McMullen said. “Last year, Dr. Josh Shrout got his flu vaccine at the 2018 Flu Blitz and wondered if it could provide a learning opportunity for students in his Water, Disease and Global Health class.  That thought turned into a problem set for this year’s class using deidentified UHS vaccine data.”Tags: Flu season, Flu shots, University Health Serviceslast_img read more

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first_img Leave it to three-time Tony winner Nathan Lane to leave audiences laughing—even in these challenging times. He appeared on Take Me to the World: A Sondheim 90th Birthday Celebration with some joking jabs at Broadway legend Stephen Sondheim: “He’s been so underappreciated all these years. I can’t believe that there’s never been a musical tribute to this unsung genius of the American musical theater. It’s about time.” Lane discussed choosing the tone of his tribute video on Late Night with Seth Meyers. After taping about 14 different versions, he chose to go the funny route. “We go way back, Mr. Sondheim and I. He loves when I’m irreverent,” Lane explained. “I might have done that joke at his 70th. He really gets a musical tribute pretty much on a monthly basis. He wrote me—he said he was very touched by it.” Lane shared how much he enjoyed being a part of the star-studded evening: “Even though they had a sort of kerfuffle in the beginning, it turned out to be a beautiful tribute.” Watch the full interview below! View Comments Nathan Lane Star Files Nathan Lanelast_img read more

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Energy Co-op solar hot water program in Chittenden County concludes

first_imgEnergy Co-op of Vermont,Since the Energy Co-op of Vermontâ s Co-op Solar program launched in March of this year, over 400 residents and business owners in Chittenden County have taken advantage of a free solar site assessment offered through the program.  The site assessment helps the homeowner understand the viability of a solar hot water system for their specific property.  It also allows the site assessor to produce a return on investment report, detailing the systemâ s payback period and cumulative financial savings over a given period of time. The program was developed in response to rising fuel costs, the increasing GHG emissions and effects of climate change, and also to help Vermonters save money while doing the right thing for the environment and their local communities.  By partnering with Vermont-based Sunward Systems, the Energy Co-op has been able to secure a deep price discount on the solar hot water heaters.  With state and federal incentives, typical installation costs have been reduced by more than 50%.  In addition, low interest solar loans from VSECU provide a financing option, allowing Co-op Solar systems to be installed with no money down.  Over the lifetime of the system, cumulative savings of more than $20,000 can be realized ‘all while reducing individual and regional carbon footprints. Even though larger, renewable energy projects can produce much more output in comparison to a single residential or commercial system, the positive effects of smaller-scale, individual and community installations are tangible.   At a recent Co-op Solar house party, where friends and neighbors are invited to come â kick the tires’of a solar hot water system installation, a Burlington resident was amazed â at how a newly-installed piece of equipment could bring the neighborhood together.’ Unfortunately, all good things must come to an end ‘but in the case of the Co-op Solar program ‘not without one last hurrah.  Thereâ s still time to sign up for the program and a free site assessment, as well as secure the significantly reduced Co-op Solar pricing before the program ends on June 30th.  While applicants must sign up by June 30th, the systems do not have to actually be installed by this date to get the Co-op discount.   Co-op Solar events are planned throughout the month, including info booths at the Richmond and Essex farmerâ s markets, June 8th and 15th respectively, as well as the Dealer.com Wellness Fair in Burlington on June 10th.  Info sessions are scheduled at Healthy Living in So. Burlington on June 7th, the Shelburne Town Offices on June 11th, and at City Market in Burlington on June 13th.  The program will also be featured on June 13th in Underhill, as part of a solar challenge that the town energy committee has issued.  A grand finale celebration will take place at Main St. Landing on June 26th as the Co-op Solar program partners sponsor the Burlington Green Drinks event. Energy Co-op of Vermont http://www.Co-opSolar.net(link is external).  The Energy Co-op of Vermont is a non-profit, member-owned energy services cooperative, delivering fuel oil, kerosene and wood pellets, and installing and servicing efficient heating equipment for a membership of more than 2,100 Vermonters.last_img read more

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Cancellation of IRONMAN 70.3 Atlantic City

first_img Related Continuing a number of event cancellations for 2020, IRONMAN has confirmed the cancellation of this year’s IRONMAN 70.3 Atlantic City, which was due to take place in September. The event is, however, scheduled to return in September 2021.IRONMAN has issued the following statement…With the health and safety of our community being an utmost priority, and with the updated guidelines set forth by the local authorities in relation to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, we regret to advise that the IRONMAN 70.3 Atlantic City triathlon cannot take place in 2020.The event will return on September 12, 2021. Athletes that are registered for the race will receive an email with further details. In what has been a continually evolving and challenging time globally, we thank our athletes for their commitment and look forward to providing them with an exceptional race experience in the future.www.ironnman.comlast_img read more

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first_imgShawnee Councilmember Eric Jenkins shared his concerns with his fellow councilmembers last week on the city’s impending stormwater repairs. File photoThe Shawnee council last week unanimously agreed they have a sense of urgency around the city’s extensive need for stormwater repairs. The city faces up to $140 million in pipe repairs over the next decade. But the council split on how it hopes to fund the repairs.After picking apart a proposal for funding stormwater repairs from councilmembers Eric Jenkins and Mike Kemmling, both representing Ward 2, at the June 18 council committee meeting, the Shawnee council rejected parts of it that called for spending cuts of 3 percent across all city departments, and a halt on new spending out of the general fund on parks and recreation, until the city’s stormwater pipes were in “adequate” condition.Shawnee’s stormwater infrastructure needs major repairs in the coming years. Photo credit city of ShawneeHowever, the council agreed to adopt a resolution in the proposal that declares the city will prioritize stormwater repairs. The council also plans to task city staff with providing monthly status updates on the city’s pipelines — including the likelihood and impact of damaged pipes — to prioritize repairs.After extensive discussion in council committee June 18, councilmembers voted 7-1 to recommend adopting the resolution. The council will consider adopting the resolution at a future meeting.Before voting against his resolution, Jenkins shared his frustrations that the council had rejected most of the recommendations in his and Kemmling’s proposal. He also disagreed with the other councilmembers’ decision to amend the text of the resolution, which had originally listed stormwater repairs as “the” top priority but now lists it as “a” top priority.“I feel like we’ve accomplished absolutely nothing,” Jenkins said.Last night at the council meeting, discussions about the stormwater repairs continued between a councilmember and members of the public.Shawnee resident Rod Houck was a member of the ‘vote no’ group against the community center initiative.Shawnee resident Rod Houck, a member of the group who opposed the community center initiative, said his group wanted to raise awareness for “unmet needs” in the city. Members of the “vote no” group have previously cited the stormwater repairs as one of these needs.Shawnee resident Tracy Thomas also cited concerns that the council had dismissed the recommendations laid out in Jenkins’ and Kemmling’s proposal.Councilmember Stephanie Meyer noted that the council accepted part of the proposal by asking city staff to find ways to fill a gap of up to $6 million to fund repairs for pipelines in the worst condition. The council had also agreed to look into funding options for these projects by possibly digging into the city’s reserves or issuing bonds to cover projects. They all were opposed to tax increases to fund repairs.“I think we had a good conversation last week; I appreciated Councilmember Jenkins putting his ideas forward, and I do not believe that the takeaways, that all of them were rejected,” Meyer said. “So that was absolutely what I was going to correct on the record.”Jenkins did not provide further comment.Ultimately, Jenkins said he hopes to make stormwater repairs “front and center” in the city’s budgetary priorities, and also look into cost savings for the city.“Unfortunately these things just won’t wait; you can’t postpone them,” Jenkins said. “We’ve got to be able to react to it effectively and get something done within a reasonable period of time.”last_img read more

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