南京夜网

CAF CC: Enyimba Thrash San Pedro To Secure Quarterfinal Berth, Rangers Held At Home

first_imgEnyimba progressed to the quarterfinals of the CAF Confederation Cup following a 5-2 victory over San Pedro of Cote d’Ivoire in Abidjan on Sunday. Abdulrahman Bashir opened the scoring for The Peoples Elephants in the second minute, while Victor Mbaoma added another a minute after.Sherif Jimoh pulled a goal back for the hosts in the sixth minute.Austin Oladapo grabbed a third for the visitors in the 25th minute thereby restoring Enyimba’s two-goal cushion.Minutes to halftime, San Pedro’s Rolan Zan Bi reduced the deficit for the Ivorian side but Nigeria’s representatives made the tie safe in the second half with goals from Mbaoma and Stanley Dimgba.The victory ensured the Peoples’ Elephant finished in second place a point behind Morocco’s Hassania Agadir who topped Group D with 11 points.Closest group rivals Paradou AC from Algeria finished third on eight points after pulling a 3-0 upset against group winners Hassania Agadir in Morocco.In Enugu, already eliminated Rangers battled to a 1-1 draw against Al Masry at the Nnamdi Azikiwe Stadium.Palestinian forward Mahmoud Wadi put the visitors ahead in the first half but Rangers forward Ifeanyi George hit back in the second half to rescue a draw for the Flying Antelopes who exit the competition in the group stage for the second straight year.Al Masry progress to the quarter-final behind fellow Egyptians and Group A winners Pyramids FC who secured a 1-0 win against FC Nouadhibou in Mauritania.The quarterfinals pairings will be decided when the draw for the knockout stage (quarter-finals and semi-finals) is held on 5 February 2020.RelatedCAFCC: I Knew I Was Going To Score Against San Pedro – Enyimba Match Winner Usule (AUDIO)December 9, 2019In “Africa”CAF CC: Enyimba, Rangers Get Group Stage OpponentsNovember 12, 2019In “Africa”CAF CC Wrap: Dimgba Hat-trick As Enyimba Hammer Paradou, Pyramids Book QF Spot, Rangers Flop AgainJanuary 13, 2020In “Africa”last_img read more

Read More

Semplici: ‘SPAL defeat undeserved’

first_imgLeonardo Semplici believes SPAL are on the right track as they take on Udinese, because the defeat to Sampdoria was “undeserved.” It kicks off at 14.00 GMT, click here for a match preview. The Stadio Paolo Mazza side are bottom of the table and desperately need to start picking up positive results. “We have spent the week trying to analyse certain things and need to give a strong response in a match situation,” said Semplici in his press conference. “We had tried to create positive situations against Sampdoria, putting us in a position to win, but it didn’t go to plan. At least we got back to being a team and playing better football, with lots of crosses, forcing many corners. It’s just we were unable to make it stick. “Losing that game to Samp was a real let-down, because even one point would’ve been negative considering the performance. Their goal came from a lucky ricochet. Sampdoria really didn’t deserve to win.” Watch Serie A live in the UK on Premier Sports for just £11.99 per month including live LaLiga, Eredivisie, Scottish Cup Football and more. Visit: https://subscribe.premiersports.tv/last_img read more

Read More

Collaboration, Integration, and Maternal Nutrition

first_imgPosted on December 17, 2010October 3, 2017By: Emily Puckart, Program Associate, MHTFClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)During the latest Woodrow Wilson International Center Dialogue on maternal undernutrition, Amy Webb Girard highlighted some effects of maternal undernutrition. Anemia, increased susceptibility to infection, depression, fatigue, low work productivity, and poor cognitive development can plague undernourished women. Just as undernutrition has a widespread effect on women’s lives, the root causes of undernourishment are varied and spread across a variety of sectors and areas of programming. In fact, addressing maternal undernutrition with a multi-sector approach was emphasized many times during the policy dialogue.Instead of viewing maternal nutrition in isolation from other maternal health programs, maternal nutrition programs can be combined with other programs to increase the chances of maternal nutrition success. Handing out iron supplements to anemic women who come for antenatal care is not effective if women only seek antenatal care late in their pregnancies, preventing them from taking the full course of iron and folic acid supplements.Similarly, encouraging women to take iron supplements is not useful if hospitals and health clinics do not keep enough tablets in their facility. Combining maternal nutrition programs with, for example, health facility strengthening programs can improve not only the care women receive but also the nutrition women receive from these facilities.How can we ensure that nutrition becomes a critical component of maternal health-focused programs? Although integrating maternal nutrition into a variety of programs is a promising approach, there are a number challenges to integration. Among these challenges, and highlighted by Doyin Oluwole, it can be difficult to keep stakeholders engaged with maternal nutrition, especially as stakeholders must content with shifting and competing priorities.Despite these challenges, it appears that addressing maternal undernutrition as a multi-sector issue could lead to promising change for women.This is the first post by Emily Puckart on “Maternal Undernutrition: Evidence, Links, and Solutions.” Read the second and the third.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Read More

first_imgJahlil Okafor featured on hype video.Duke freshman big man Jahlil Okafor, who is averaging 17.8 points per game and 9.4 rebounds per game, is widely considered to be the best player in college basketball. It looks like the school is putting together a marketing campaign to make sure he’s rewarded for it. Friday afternoon, just hours ahead of the team’s big rivalry showdown with North Carolina, Duke has released a “JAHS 15” hype video to promote him for Player of the Year. Both the graphics and the music in the clip reference the movie JAWS.Will it work? We’ll find out soon enough. Okafor is one of just a few viable candidates for the award.last_img read more

Read More

The Most-Likely Upset Loss For Every Top 25 Team

first_imgCollage of logos of top college football programs.Upsets are a huge part of what makes college football so damn entertaining. Few things in sports are better than watching an undefeated, national championship-contending team go down in tragic fashion. Just last year, an undefeated Ohio State fell at home to Michigan State, an undefeated Alabama lost at home to Ole Miss and an undefeated Florida State lost on the road to Georgia Tech. All three of those games were among the most-entertaining of the season.  People really love watching an underdog pull off a spectacular upset victory. The 2016 college football season is now exactly one month away. Upsets are on the way. Most college football teams will suffer at least one unexpected loss this fall. While it’s tough to predict them (upsets are usually unpredictable by nature), we’re going to give it a shot. Here is every top 25 team (in ESPN’s preseason poll) most-likely upset loss. Start With No. 25 ??? >>>Pages: Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6last_img read more

Read More

Canadas Kreesha Turner channels Jamaican roots in debut film King of the

first_imgKreesha Turner promotes the film “King of the Dancehall,” during the 2016 Toronto International Film Festival on Thursday, Sept. 8, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young Turner has three songs on the film’s soundtrack. But as she shifted gears to her screen role, she admitted to some initial anxiety about relinquishing certain creative controls. Advertisement The American entertainer was acting as manager for the Edmonton-born singer-songwriter when he accompanied her to Jamaica on business. Advertisement by Lauren La Rose “King of the Dancehall” had its world premiere at last year’s Toronto International Film Festival and was later acquired by YouTube Red, the streaming site’s subscription service. In Canada, “King of the Dancehall” is available for purchase on the streaming site. “Because I’m such a cultural ambassador to Jamaica, I showed him all the things that I loved. And he was fascinated and intrigued and inspired by it and ended up writing his script, and here we have ‘King of the Dancehall.’” Cannon directs and stars as Tarzan, a Brooklyn native who heads to Jamaica to enter the drug trade in an effort to cover the medical bills of his ailing mother (played by Whoopi Goldberg). With the help of his cousin (Busta Rhymes) he makes headway into the world of weed. When Tarzan arrives in Kingston, he gets swept up into the dancehall craze and gets help from Maya (Kimberly Patterson) to find his groove. “There’s a certain type of movement that is very African-oriented. It’s very grounded, it’s very earthy. Their type of movement is just different … than jazz or hip hop or ballet. It has a very different foundation and usage of the body.” Login/Register With: She said she had a lot of fun training alongside dancers for her role and “absorbing the culture” entrenched within the local scene. “I’d never done a headstand in my life, and I started taking yoga so that I could learn because there’s a lot of yoga positions that are on your head,” she said. “I did headstands every day for at least a couple of hours a day for three months straight until I got it.” Follow @lauren_larose on Twitter. Turner makes her acting debut as Kaydeen, who is vying for Tarzan’s affections. The pulsating reggae music — typically characterized by rhyming or singing over uptempo beats — was popularized by artists like Sean Paul, Shabba Ranks and Beenie Man and has influenced superstars like Rihanna and Drake. “Nick’s a super down to earth, chill person,” said Turner.  “Because there’s so many unexpected elements with the non-actors and actresses, he kind of allowed us to feel it out in a sense….  He wanted to catch people in their natural element.” Advertisement “The character is so opposite of my personality. I’m like: ‘Yo, people are going to hate me after this movie because I cause a lot of trouble,’” said Turner. “Needless to say there’s the lead girl, and I’m trying to steal her man.” Turner credited Cannon’s relaxed attitude for helping to contribute to a more laid-back atmosphere during filming. Turner’s ties to the island run deep, having attended high school there and her regular visits to relatives over Christmas and summer holidays. She credits Jamaica for helping her foray into music. Turner said she didn’t start singing until she was 16, after landing a spot in the church youth choir based on the strength of her rendition of “O Canada” in a solo audition. Facebook “When inviting foreigners to the island, you want to show them the part of the culture that they wouldn’t see if they were just there as a tourist on their own. So I had the opportunity to take him to all of my favourite things in Kingston,” recalled the Juno Award-nominated Turner. TORONTO — Nick Cannon’s name may be atop the marquee, but the newly minted filmmaker owes partial credit to Canada’s Kreesha Turner for helping make his directorial debut a reality. “When I’m shooting a music video, it’s me, it’s my song, I know all the lyrics, there’s no second-guessing in my head. Everybody who’s on set is specifically placed there,” she said. “This movie in particular is shot guerilla-style.” Turner said many people are unaware of the dance crews in Kingston, which she likens to b-boy culture in hip hop. Turner said part of her training involved learning the art of “head top,” or spinning on her head. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twitterlast_img read more

Read More

Ohio State offense goes uptempo finds its stride with Ed Warinner upstairs

OSU redshirt sophomore J.T. Barrett (16) carries the ball while redshirt senior tight end Nick Vannett (81) looks for a defender to block during a game against Michigan on Nov. 28. OSU won, 42-13. Credit: Samantha Hollinshead | Photo EditorFor most of the season, the Ohio State offense seemed to have a flat tire. It was moving forward, but something was present that hampered it from rolling at its expected pace.Then, against Michigan State last week, the wheels fell off.The offense sputtered to just 132 yards in a puncturing loss, leaving behind a storm cloud of questions about what was vitiating a unit with so much talent. Amid the aftermath, OSU coach Urban Meyer seemed to stumble upon a solution. It had nothing to do with someone wearing shoulder pads or a helmet. Rather, it lied with those wearing headsets. The fix? Moving offensive coordinator and offensive line coach Ed Warinner from the sideline up to the coaches box for a better vantage point in calling plays.It might be a small sample size, but judging off Saturday’s 42-13 shellacking of 10th-ranked Michigan, it worked.“He did a marvelous job,” Meyer said of Warinner. “We had to make the move … On Tuesday, I just said, ‘We’re going to do this.’” The decision to alter Warinner’s gameday location might appear to be past due after the offense’s struggles throughout parts of the year, but there are reasons for its late arrival. It is Warinner’s first season with the title “offensive coordinator” in front of his name after former offensive coordinator and quarterback coach Tom Herman left Columbus for a head-coaching job at Houston. Tim Beck was brought in from Nebraska to coach quarterbacks and be co-offensive coordinator. For much of the early going, Beck, Warinner and Meyer all collaborated through the headsets on gameday about play-calling, with Beck being upstairs. With the loss of a key coach, especially one of Herman’s abilities, growing pains should be present as the coaches settle on gameday roles. For the defending national champions, it just so happened that the growth took some time. The other main reason, Meyer said, was because of Warinner’s job as the offensive line coach. “To coach all five guys, and call a game, to be involved in the play calling — that’s tough,” Meyer said. “It’s difficult. You can only do that with a veteran offensive line.”Fortunately for the Buckeyes, a veteran offensive line is exactly what they have. Four of the five starters were on the O-line that engineered massive holes down the stretch en route to winning the title. The only new starter — right tackle Chase Ferris — happens to be a fifth-year senior. Without having its position coach on the sideline, concerns over how the offensive line is to deal with in-game adjustments are valid. It just took hitting rock bottom against the Spartans for the coaching staff to confront those concerns. To fill his void during the game, Warinner said tight end coach Tim Hinton traded the warmth of the coaches box for a spot on the sideline. In addition, they also relied heavily on graduate assistant and former NFL offensive lineman Jim Cordle and senior center Jacoby Boren.Warinner was heavy in his praise for Cordle and Boren, noting that he communicated with Boren a few times over the headset when he had comments or concerns. “Jacoby understands what everybody does,” Warinner said. “I knew that if something was going on that we needed to make adjustments, that we could just call him and he would understand.” Since a way to address all the concerns had been concocted, it allowed Warinner to go upstairs, where play calling becomes easier because of increased vision of the field. With that addition, it allowed the Buckeyes to play up-tempo for sustained periods of time.“Part of playing fast is, ‘What’s the next call? Is it second-and-10, or second-and-5?’” Warinner said. “The situations, you see them. You don’t have to wait for someone to tell you. You just see it all and go.” With its new set of wheels and a reduced operation time, the offense sure did go, racking up 482 yards, 369 of which came on the ground. At one point, it scored touchdowns on five of six possessions. The up-tempo scheme worked, as the Michigan defense became notably fatigued as the game worn on. “You saw what happened when he went up there and called the plays today,” senior left tackle Taylor Decker said. “He’s a very capable coach and that criticism he was taking was unwarranted … The game plan wasn’t very complicated. It was very simple but it was high execution.” Warinner said he was “real comfortable” up in the coaches box, noting that during early stops in his career, he called plays from upstairs. He also said the transition to working alongside Beck during the game was “very smooth.” Because of the offense’s success against the Wolverines, there is reason to believe Warinner will remain upstairs for whatever postseason play comes the Buckeyes’ way. But the coach was quick to deny it was a permanent. He instead tried to deflect attention off his migration to the coaches box to the players and their performance.“It’s real gratifying for our team, our players, for the whole program when you win this game,” Warinner said. “It’s all about that, it’s not about me or do I feel better. Sure, I feel better because we won. Anything after that is fine but, it’s for the kids.” read more

Read More

Football Ohio State lands fourstar wide receiver Jaylen Harris over the likes

After the decommitment of Tyjon Lindsey earlier this week, and the announcement of former wide receiver Torrance Gibson’s transfer to Cincinnati, the Ohio State football team has landed another recruit to play wideout. This time, the commitment comes from Ohio native and four-star receiver Jaylen Harris.Harris, hailing from Cleveland Heights, is the sixth-ranked wide receiver in the state of Ohio, according to 247Sports.com. He joins the likes of Josh Myers, Brendon White, Amir Riep and Marcus Williamson as top Ohio players to make the decision to play in Columbus.OSU scooped up Harris over the likes of Michigan State and Penn State. The big-bodied wide receiver brings a height advantage in nearly every matchup, standing at 6-foot-5, according to 247Sports.com.Harris is just the second wide receiver commit from the 2017 class for OSU, and the 19th verbal commitment the Buckeyes have received for this year’s class. He joins Trevon Grimes as incoming freshman receivers who could receive a role in Urban Meyer’s team next season.The C O M M I T M E N T#HolyHungryHumblehttps://t.co/jtLthKf3b5— Jaylen Harris (@JHarris5_) January 13, 2017 read more

Read More

Former Ohio State wide receiver Cris Carter to be inducted into Pro

It took him six years, but former Ohio State wide receiver Cris Carter has finally been elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame as part of the 2013 class. Carter, who played for OSU from 1984-1986, will be the 10th Buckeye to be enshrined in Canton, Ohio, behind Dick LeBeau (2010), Paul Warfield (1993), Bill Willis (1977), Dante Lavelli (1975), Lou Groza (1974) and Jim Parker (1973), coaches Sid Gillman (1983) and Paul Brown (1967) and contributor Ed Sabol (2011) for his work with NFL Films. The standout wide receiver ranks second in OSU history for career receptions (168) and touchdowns (27) and fourth in receiving yards (2,725). Carter’s record five consecutive 100-plus yard games still stands today. In his 16-year NFL career with the Philadelphia Eagles, Minnesota Vikings and Miami Dolphins, Carter amassed 1,101 receptions for 13,899 yards and 130 touchdowns, which rank fourth, ninth and fourth, respectively, in NFL history. Carter is part of the NFL’s All-Decade team of the 1990s, being selected to eight consecutive Pro Bowls from 1994-2001, as well as being named an all-pro in 1994 and 1999. Upon hearing the news, Carter broke down in tears of joy during an interview with ESPN. “This is the happiest day of my life,” he said. “When people said, ‘Aw, you know, it really doesn’t matter, you’re a Hall of Famer in my eyes,’ I said, ‘It’s more important that I’m a Hall of Famer in the Hall’s eyes.’ And I really, really wanted this.” Carter’s son, Duron Carter, played for OSU during the 2009-10 season, but he was ruled academically ineligible at the end of the season. He sat out the 2010 Rose Bowl and all of the spring practices before withdrawaling from OSU in June 2010 to attend community college in Kansas. He never returned to OSU. Rounding out the rest of the 2013 class will be guard/tackle Larry Allen, defensive tackle Curley Culp, tackle Jonathan Ogden, coach Bill Parcells, linebacker Dave Robinson and defensive tackle Warren Sapp. Carter will be formally inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame on Aug. 3 at Fawcett Stadium in Canton, Ohio. read more

Read More

Jesse King focused on team goals for Ohio State mens lacrosse

Senior midfielder Jesse King (19) takes on a defender during a game against Denver on March 14 at Ohio Stadium. OSU won, 13-11.Credit: Molly Tavoletti / Lantern reporterBetween his time with Ohio State and the Canadian National team, Jesse King has scored 107 goals.The first three came on Feb. 9, 2012, in the now-senior midfielder’s first game for the Buckeyes, and the most recent five came last weekend in OSU’s inaugural Big Ten home victory over Johns Hopkins. In between, there was one on July 15, which King scored for the 2014 World Champion Canadian National Team.Four seasons, 64 games split between OSU and the national team and 98 other goals have blurred by for the Buckeye captain, who said he intends to continue his already impressive lacrosse story as a professional. Though his time as a Buckeye is quickly drawing to a close, King said his work at OSU remains far from finished.“We’ve accomplished a lot of things, but we haven’t accomplished our goal of winning a championship,” King said.The midfielder focuses on games one at a time, and is currently working toward a Big Ten Championship run with the No. 11 Buckeyes, he said. The conference tournament is set to take place in College Park, Md., from April 30 to May 2, but the passion King intends to use to accomplish that goal originated 15 years ago and nearly 3,000 miles northwest of College Park, where he first picked up a lacrosse stick in Victoria, British Columbia.“I started when I was 7 years old,” King said. “I played box lacrosse pretty much my whole life, along with hockey for basically 10 years. But as you get older, you want to focus more on just one sport, so I dropped hockey, made the commitment to go to a high school about 25 minutes away from my house so that I could be in the lacrosse program.”From day one, King possessed an innate desire to win, he said. But when he realized lacrosse could be his gateway to an affordable education in the United States, his motivation to improve his game grew even stronger.“I didn’t even know going to the States for school was a possibility until grade 11. At the time, not a lot of people in Canada were doing that,” King said. “But I learned if you’re really good, you could to get into a school down there and play lacrosse. If I hadn’t have gotten a good scholarship, I probably wouldn’t have gone to school at all because I couldn’t afford it.”Through several recruiting camps the summer before his senior year, King first committed to play at Bellarmine University in Louisville, Ky., but soon realized his desire and ability to dream bigger. He re-evaluated his decision, and after one invited visit to OSU, he committed to the Buckeyes.“We knew what we were getting with Jesse coming in,” OSU coach Nick Myers said. “He’s been really hungry from the start to improve.”As a freshman and sophomore, King’s individual success on the field blossomed, and as sets of senior leaders moved on from OSU, his role began to evolve.“He understands it’s more than just scoring goals,” Myers said. “He has to lead in the right way and be a positive voice that the guys understand. And even now, he’s continued to grow in that way.”King admitted he remains far from perfect, so in addition to daily three- to four-hour practices, he tries to commit a few extra days of lifting, shooting and stick work. He hopes not only to refine his craft, but also to set an example for his team.“It’s his relentless effort,” junior midfielder Kacy Kapinos said. “He leads by action. He gets in there and takes every drill 100 percent, as hard as he can. And he has a big impact on the younger guys.”That focused, “never settle” approach has paid off — King has last summer’s gold medal to prove it — but where does his perpetual motivation come from? How does the 22-year-old student-athlete manage success while maintaining balance?“It’s really a lot of different things,” King said. “When you’re with a team every day for four years, there’s a brotherhood that’s created. You really wanna do things for each other on the field, and that drives me. It’s definitely hard being a student athlete, but I wouldn’t have changed it for a second.”Regardless of this season’s outcome, King said he rests assured his time as a Buckeye was well spent, leading him to the next chapter of his life.In January, King was selected in the first round of the 2015 Major League Lacrosse Collegiate Draft by the Rochester Rattlers, paving the way toward his professional career. But he said he still has options, and hopes to one day play for his home town Victoria Shamrocks in the Western Lacrosse Association.“With professional lacrosse, there are a lot of different paths you could take, so getting to play and still have a career is going to be a lot of trying different things out, but I know I want lacrosse to be a part of my life,” King said. “Down the road, I’ve been looking into becoming a firefighter for the city of Victoria. I’d be able to help people in my hometown and keep playing lacrosse for my home team in the summers.”To watch Lantern TV’s interview with Jesse King, watch the video below, and skip to 3:47. read more

Read More