February 2021

Brazilians Promote Good News ‘Day of Light’ March 9

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreOn March 9th, if you see a newpaper or magazine with any good news published, buy it. This is The Day of Light, a day that asks people to stop and choose their attitude, making there needs to be more positivity in the media.Created in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the Day of Light began as a conversation among a group of DJs, videographers, advertisers and journalists who noticed that the public gets hit too often with negative news. The way out, they decided, was to regain power over the news by actively influencing the stories that shape the lives of those who read them. So, on March 9th, you are invited to stop, step out of your roles of spectators and only buy newspapers and magazines that display at least one positive story on the cover.“Bad things do happen, and they do have to be brought to people’s attention,” says Fabio K. Guimarães, who ignited the idea. “But there is also good news, which can inspire people and generate positive initiatives. We intend to make people aware of the fact that good news attracts good things and to propose more balance to the media.”The initiative is supported by Cláudio Lins, Eduardo Moscovis, Natália Lage, Ingrid Guimarães and other well-known local TV personalities.The Day of Light is not, however, just a day to read good news. On the same day (March 9th), at 11 a.m., a group will leave from Posto 6, in Copacabana beach, and walk as far as Leme – in a collective act to raise awareness for the cause.The organizers are inviting others to do the same, wherever they are. Watch the video below. (If you speak Portuguese, choose that option on YouTube, since it has more nuance in the original.)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Read More

Library of Congress Puts Thousands of Historic Books Online

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreNearly 60,000 books prized by historians, writers and genealogists, many too old and fragile to be safely handled, have been digitally scanned as part of the first-ever mass book-digitization project of the U.S. Library of Congress (LOC), the world’s largest library. Anyone who wants to learn about the early history of the United States, or track the history of their own families, can read and download these books for free. “The Library chose books that people wanted, but that were too old and fragile to serve to readers. They won’t stand up to handling,” said Michael Handy, who co-managed the project, which is called Digitizing American Imprints. “Many of these books cover a period of Western settlement of the United States — 1865–1922 — and offer historians a trove of information that’s otherwise tough to locate,” he said. Books published before 1923 are in the public domain in the United States because their U.S. copyrights have expired. The oldest work in the batch, dated 1707, covers the trial of two Presbyterian ministers in New York. The 25,000th book to be digitized was a 1902 children’s history book, The Heroic Life of Abraham Lincoln: The Great Emancipator, in time for Lincoln’s bicentennial on February 12, 2009. These and the other digitized books can be accessed through the Library’s catalog Web site and the Internet Archive (IA), a nonprofit organization dedicated to building and maintaining a free online digital library. “The Library’s collections are of unbelievable scope and depth,” said Internet Archive co-founder Brewster Kahle. “Now, with an Internet connection, you can download, print or bind copies of all these books.” In addition to the LOC collection, IA includes content from other institutions that are part of the Open Content Alliance, a consortium of organizations around the world that seeks to build an archive of free, multilingual, digitized text and multimedia material. HISTORY AND GENEALOGY Many of the newly digitized LOC works contain hard-to-obtain Civil War regimental histories and county, state and regional information relating to specific people, their occupations and families, and other details that are important for historians and genealogists. Of an 1854 work by David Sutherland, titled Address delivered to the inhabitants of Bath, New Hampshire, one reader wrote, “I loved it. My two children are descendants of this gentle man. Very interesting first person accounts of early American life.” Books sit on a cart ready to be scanned for the Library of Congress mass book-digitization project. Nearly 60,000 books focusing on history and genealogy have been scanned, including many too fragile to be handled by readers. The scanned books, which are available on the Library of Congress and Internet Archive Web sites, are stored in a special facility in Maryland for safekeeping. Another reader commented on The Causes of the American Civil War by John Lothrop Motley, published in 1861 as the war began: “This is an amazing gift for humanity! We must be thankful with the people involved in this gigantic project, which is an open door to the treasures of our history. Thank you very much for doing this.” The Library of Congress has digitized many of its other collections — more than 7 million photographs, maps, audio and video recordings, newspapers, letters and diaries can be found at the Library’s Digital Collections site, such as the popular American Memory and the multilingual Global Gateways collections — but “this is the first sustained book-digitization project on a high-volume basis,” Handy said. The Internet Archive is the second-largest book-scanning project after Google Books. A subset of this project is the Google Books Library Project, which has agreements to scan collections of numerous research libraries worldwide. (Google Books remains the subject of legal challenges, particularly regarding copyright issues.) DIGITIZATION CHALLENGES A $2 million grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation inaugurated the LOC book digitization project. One of the grant’s objectives was “to address some of the issues that other book digitization projects had mainly avoided dealing with — for instance, the brittle book issue,” Handy said. “We established some procedures and preservation treatments to be able to scan books that otherwise couldn’t be scanned.” The library also worked with Internet Archive — which provided the scanning equipment — to develop a special station for scanning fold-out materials such as maps. Before and after scanning, a librarian inspects each book for damage — what Handy calls “preservation triage.” Ten scanning specialists sit at “Scribe” scanning stations. In each Scribe, two digital cameras hover over the open book on a mechanized tabletop. The specialist positions the book for accurate scanning, snaps the digital photos with a foot pedal, then turns the page and scans the next pages. The teams can scan 1,000 volumes per week. Hours after scanning and inspection, the books are available on the Internet. The Library of Congress is producing a report on best practices for dealing with brittle books and fold-out materials that it plans to post on its Web site and share with the Internet Archive and other members of the Open Content Alliance “so it’s available to anybody,” Handy added. The scanned books are retired to an environmentally controlled storage facility at Fort Meade, Maryland, “where they will not be served again, they will be preserved,” he said. Other federal agencies such as the Department of the Treasury and the Government Printing Office are sending books and documents through the Library of Congress scanning center (PDF, 90KB). It’s “an opportunity to demonstrate government transparency,” Kahle said. The Internet Archive tracks downloads. “It’s great to know that a Library book has now been used dozens or hundreds of times via the Internet Archive,” Handy said. “More funding will be sought to keep this going after this year. This is just the beginning.” (America.gov) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Read More

Doing Laundry for Homeless Earns Them Young Australians of the Year Award

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreA pair of best friends have been named Young Australians of the Year for doing laundry for the homeless.Nic Marchesi and Lucas Patchett have washed, at no charge, more than 75 tons of clothes belonging to homeless people in Australian cities with their fleet of vans equipped with industrial washing machines and dryers.WANT MORE GOOD NEWS ABOUT YOUTH? GET OUR APP—>  Download FREE for Android and iOSThe buddies from Brisbane started Orange Sky Laundry in 2014 with a single truck they converted into a mobile laundry that contained two washers and two dryers. Less than two years later, they oversee trucks in five cities and have 270 volunteers to help.Calling clean clothes “a basic human right,” the two 21-year-olds and their volunteers take the mobile laundries, which run on generators, right into parks and homeless centers—wherever people need them. They’ve also deployed their vans during disasters to help people forced out of their homes by wildfires and cyclones.RELATED:  Nonprofit Retrofits Buses as Mobile Showers for the HomelessIt’s the first time two people have shared the honor of Young Australian of the Year, one of four categories of people honored each year on Australia Day, celebrated on January 26, and marking the anniversary of the 1788 arrival of the First Fleet of British ships in the country.Marchesi and Patchett say their Orange Sky Laundry service helps homeless citizens connect with the community. It also raises health standards, while simply letting the homeless gain respect with a clean suit of clothes.(WATCH the video from Orange Sky Laundry and READ more at the Sydney Morning Herald) — Photo: Orange Sky LaundryMULTIPLY the Good… Share the IdeaAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Read More

Teens Show True Sportsmanship After Baseball Championship Win (WATCH)

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreA week after losing the Indiana 4-A baseball championship, he remembers most vividly the moment when an opponent, instead of celebrating with his teammates without abandon, came over to console him, the pitcher who’d dropped to the mound, face down in defeat.WATCH: Dad Uses Cat-Like Reflexes To Save Son From Flying Baseball BatThe Roncalli high school catcher told WTHR ”I saw the heartbreak and the stress on all their players but especially him laying almost lifelessly by the mound. It just really got to me and I just wanted to go over there and tell him everything was going to be alright.”And so he did.(WATCH the moment below or READ more from WTHR) –Photos via WTHR videoAdd Some Inspiration to Your Newsfeed– Share This…AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Read More

After Student Wakes Up From Coma, Classmates Redo Graduation For Him (WATCH)

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreWhen a Pennsylvania teen literally slept through his high school graduation week, his classmates were willing to re-stage the entire milestone ceremony for him.WATCH: Gymnast Falling on Her Head Saved By Coach With Ninja MovesScott Dunn was injured in a car crash just days before he was set to receive his diploma, and remained in a coma for days, missing his graduation. Three weeks after the ceremony, when his classmates were already well into their summer vacations, Dunn was suddenly back on his feet. We don’t know who organized it, but half of those graduating seniors from East Juniata High School returned to the gymnasium with their caps and gowns, giving their friend a celebration do-over.To cheers from the crowd, Dunn was able to walk across the stage and pick up his diploma.CHECK OUT: High School Implements Later Start Times, Sees Dramatic Improvements“I’m speechless, to know this many people are behind me,” Dunn told WPVI News.(WATCH the video from ABC) — Photo: news videoMove Your Classmates, Share This…AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Read More

Veterans Treated by Community Health Centers Increases by 43%

first_imgThe research also reveals that in 2015, nearly 9 out of 10 health centers served veterans, a finding that suggests improved access to care for many in this vulnerable population. In 3 states – West Virginia, Maine, and Alaska – health centers served 1 in 20 veterans or higher, while in Vermont, health centers served over 1 in 10 veterans. Health centers serving veterans offer a wide range of services; in addition to primary medical care, 78 percent offer dental care, 83 percent provide mental health services, 21 percent offer substance abuse treatment, and virtually all health centers offer services that improve access to healthcare.MORE: Veteran Homelessness Has Dropped 50% Since 2010Today half of all health centers are certified by the Veterans Administration (VA) as Veterans Choice providers under the special program established by Congress to improve access to community-based health care for veterans facing long wait times or travel distances for services at VA facilities.“Community health centers have long and deep experience serving our nation’s veterans. As the Veteran’s Administration works to improve access to essential services through partnerships and collaborations, health centers are ready and able partners to meet the unique needs of those who have served our country,” said Feygele Jacobs, CEO and President of the RCHN Community Health Foundation, which funded the infographic.RELATED: Connecticut Becomes Second State to End Veteran HomelessnessDan Hawkins, Senior Vice President of Public Policy and Research at the National Association of Community Health Centers noted, “Veterans have given so much to their – and our – country, so community health centers are committed to providing the very best care to them every day. This has even more importance when you consider the fact that health centers are located in communities with many low-income vets but with few or no other care providers.”(Source: Milken Institute School of Public Health)Positivity Is Healthy: Click To Share With Your FriendsAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreThe number of veterans served by community health centers has increased dramatically from 214,000 to more than 305,000, a 43 percent increase in less than 10 years, according to an infographic produced by researchers at the Geiger Gibson/RCHN Community Health Foundation Research Collaborative, which is based at the George Washington University’s Milken Institute School of Public Health (Milken Institute SPH).last_img read more

Read More

Alex Trebek Turns 80, Releases New Memoir From Lockdown: ‘The Answer Is…’

first_imgBroadcast Some Happy Birthday Greetings to Alex on Social Media By SHARING…AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore Today, on his 80th birthday, Trebek says he is “not afraid of dying,” yet he will head back to the show as soon as coronavirus restrictions are lifted.While hosting his 36th season, he was undergoing rounds of chemo treatments and wore a wig whenever they taped the show because he was losing his hair.Even though cancer has taken its toll, he says that as soon as he gets onstage, “it all changes suddenly. I’m myself again. I feel good,” he wrote in his new memoir, The Answer Is… Reflections on My Life.The set of Jeopardy photographed by Joseph Hunkins, CC license, croppedThe book combines personal anecdotes with Trebek’s thoughts on a range of topics, including marriage, parenthood, education, success, spirituality, and philanthropy (his charitable giving has benefitted World Vision, the USO, United Negro College Fund, National Geographic Society, and Hope of the Valley Rescue Mission).WATCH: Jeopardy’s Alex Trebek Get Choked Up When Contestant Uses Final Answer to Express Love for HostIt uses a fun structure inspired by Jeopardy, with each chapter title presented in the form of a question, “What Is…”Sean Manning, the executive editor at Simon & Schuster which published the book said, “Today, when there is so much uncertainty and turmoil in the world, Alex Trebek is a beacon of stability and positivity.”The book, which dropped in bookstores yesterday, features dozens of never-before-seen candid photos of Trebek over the years—and the 7-time Emmy winner from Canada also answers the questions Jeopardy fans ask most, such as what prompted him to shave his signature mustache, and his opinion of Will Ferrell’s Saturday Night Live impersonation.RELATED: Wife of Alex Trebek Launches Positive Lifestyle WebsiteAnd he provides plenty more answers to questions like What is… ‘How it feels to be 80 and living with cancer.’ He peppers those passages with curse words, because that’s who he is in real life.“I want people to know a little more about the person they have been cheering on for the past year,” he wrote.WATCH an exclusive ABC interview from this week…ALSO check out this funny video showing a day in the life of Alex behind the cameras… AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreSince 1984, when he debuted as the host of Jeopardy, Alex Trebek has been like family to the millions of viewers who joined him on television 5 nights a week.And, like family, they embraced him with love and support—and an outpouring of letters, guidance, and prayers—after Alex announced last year that he had been diagnosed with stage four pancreatic cancer,For decades, he put off writing a book about his life—until all that goodwill changed his mind. And the COVID-19 lockdown provided him with all the time he needed.last_img read more

Read More

Grandmother and Her Granddaughter Delight Community With Enchanting Fairy House Tours

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreThis grandmother-granddaughter team have been making fairy houses for years, but when COVID-19 hit they got busy creating little magical vignettes they could place outside for the community to enjoy.The fairy tour begins on a New York state street, at a tiny mailbox next to a tree that holds a listing of each little house and its name—14 all together. “The fairies can sit by the waterfall and sneak into my grandma’s garden to steal fresh raspberries”, according to the granddaughter. “They can also play tic tac bug.”RELATED: ‘Wine Fairies’ Have Been Anonymously Gifting Booze and Treats to Neighbors Who Could Use a SmileAfter lunch the fairies can head over to ‘Flo’s Creek’ to sit under the gazebo and read or collect pink petunias.‘Aqua’s Flip Flop Inn’, looks very inviting for a swim, boat ride, or just for relaxing in the sun and sand.The Inn has a turquoise roof imbedded with shells, a rainbow door, and a one-inch tall sandcastle. A sparking boulder painted with a mandala pattern sits to the left of the door and a crystal covered rock to the right.MORE: Take a Look Inside Britain’s Tallest Cottage – It’s Filled With FairiesEach teeny-tiny house has a special feel about it: They’re certainly places any fairy would love to live. Hidden under bushes and burrowed at the bases of huge trees, surrounded by the smell of showy flowers and the gurgling of a waterfall, the settings couldn’t be more enchanting.At the end of the tour sits a three-inch tall treasure chest filled with colorful jewels. “Well, I hope you enjoyed your fairy garden tour”, say the words on the sign, “because I really enjoyed it so much. Please take a jewel to remember your visit.”This fairy land has been put away for the upcoming winter for now, but you can still take the full guided tour through this video.It’s a wonderful reminder of the magic all around us—and how we just need to slow down long enough to see it.SHARE The Fairy Magic With Your Friends On Social Media…AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore An arrow points the way to a lovely flower-filled garden where the houses are nestled in between greenery and colorful blooms.The first stop on the Finger Lakes tour is ‘Bernie’s Buttons’: a round mosaic house with a bright pink door and jewels that sparkle in the sun. It’s made out of a tin can, plaster of Paris, old buttons, glitter, and beads.“We love to use things that can be recycled, and other found objects, like old buttons” says the grandmother Carol. “We especially enjoy making the pathways. We just use plaster from the hardware store and inset all types of things from pebbles to glitter and plastic jewels.”Next stop is ‘Finley’s Shanty’, where an old stone pathway welcomes visiting fairies to enter via the round wooden door. A huge crystal ball glows with mysterious powers. A tiny handmade sign says ‘Welcome’ and a decorative wire bench invites tired fairies to sit for a spell.Where do the fairies go for lunch? ‘Beans Pod’.last_img read more

Read More

NASA Technology to Map The Stars Could Now Help Save World’s Largest Fish

first_imgMORE: Fishermen Rescue Rare Whale From Nets Thanks to New Training ProgramThe spots just behind the whale shark’s fins are unique to each fish, so Norman and company can see where each one travels, breeds, and likes to stay. This is actually typical of biology. Animals like cheetahs and leopards have totally unique coats of spots, and polar bears can be identified even through just the arrangement of their whiskers.CHECK OUT: Scientists Finally Manage to Record the Strange Sounds of the ‘Arctic Unicorn’—the Elusive NarwhalAs space and the ocean remain the final frontiers for scientific exploration, it seems only fitting that such a legendary space explorer as the Hubble Telescope should be used to help plumb the depths of the sea, especially when it’s looking for an animal which in the Malagasy language is known as marokintana, which means “many stars.”HELP Your Friends Space Out to the Good News By Sharing it Online…AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreHigh above our planet, the Hubble Space Telescope has special software for parsing out the details of each individual star it surveys. Now this technology is being turned back towards Earth to help an animal that, while not as big as a star, is still quite a hefty unit.Jeremy BishopDespite being the largest fish in the ocean, whale sharks are one of the least understood of their kind. Marine biologists don’t have good data on their migration patterns, their global hotspots, breeding sites, or if they follow a seasonal food source.It is principally this lack of knowledge that has prevented scientists from being able to develop conservation strategies to protect the animal from sliding further and further towards extinction. Now a new citizen science project utilizes the Hubble’s “Groth” algorithm—normally used for identifying individual stars in the universe—to map photographed-whale sharks’ spotted patterns, of which no two are alike, and therefore effectively act like a fingerprint.The algorithm forms the brain of a new photographic database of whale sharks, the largest ever assembled, that marine biologist Brad Norman of Western Australia’s Murdoch University used to create the Wildbook for Whale Sharks—a library of individually identified sharks that anyone, hobbyist scuba diver, amateur scientist, or professional biologist, can contribute to.“At the start it was just me taking photos of whale sharks at Ningaloo, but we needed more than one lonely researcher to collect enough data over an extended period,” Dr. Norman said in a statement. “And, because tourists were constantly swimming with whale sharks too, why not enlist their support?”“I was fortunate to team up with two brilliant scientists, software guru Jason Holmberg and NASA astrophysicist Zaven Arzoumanian, to develop a user-friendly database where anyone, anywhere can upload their own images of whale sharks.”“We’re talking about an animal considered to be rare, maybe a couple of hundred documented sightings in all of history,” Jason Holmberg, who came up with the idea to turn the Hubble’s Groth algorithm on the sharks, and who teamed up with Dr. Norman to create the database, told NASA.When the Stars and Sea CombineNow the library contains more than 76,000 sightings of 12,357 sharks, each one capable of growing up to 40 feet long and weighing 20 tons. These gentle, filter-feeding giants are somewhere between Endangered and Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List, and the database will go a long way towards ensuring that their feeding grounds and migration and breeding habitat can be found and preserved.last_img read more

Read More

SMC raises awareness for disorders

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s chapter of the National Student Speech Language Hearing Association (NSSHLA) hosted an event highlighting the professions available to students interested in communicative disorders Sunday. Current Saint Mary’s students and high school seniors from the South Bend community attended the free event to learn more about the professions and collect more information about the communicative disorders major at Saint Mary’s. The event featured student speakers, tours of the pathology and audiology labs at Saint Mary’s and a discussion panel with current speech and language pathologists and audiologists from the community. Senior Elizabeth Downs, vice president of the Saint Mary’s NSSHLA chapter, organized the event and spoke to prospective students. “We think it’s very important to promote our major because not many people know what we do,” she said. “It’s a great profession to go into, especially if you enjoy helping others. I fell in love with the intro class I took and I am really happy with my decision [to be a communicative disorders major].” Senior Lori LeClere, president of the Saint Mary’s NSSHLA chapter, said advertising the important need for communicative disorders majors was a goal of Sunday’s event. “We hope students learn about the career path — what they can do, where they can do it,” she said. “We want them to get an inside view of what speech pathology and audiology are. I came to Saint Mary’s without knowledge of the profession, so we feel it is necessary to educate others about what we do.” Downs and LeClere agreed that knowledge and awareness of professions in communicative disorders are crucial to getting more students interested in being involved. Some current communicative disorders majors were unaware that the major even existed before starting at Saint Mary’s. “I came to Saint Mary’s as a biology major,” junior Maria Malm said. “I had a general interest in helping others, and when I took the Intro to Communicative Disorders class and did my observation of others, I discovered I really enjoyed helping others. I decided to switch majors.” Malm said she hoped the NSSHLA event on Sunday stimulated more interest in the communicative disorders major, as the need for qualified therapists, pathologists and audiologists continues to rise. “Communication is essential to having high quality of life,” she said. “There is a great need for speech pathology to help others communicate their needs and wants. I look forward to helping others and getting a hands on feel for giving a voice to those with communicative disorders.”last_img read more

Read More