February 2020

Eagles brace for do-or-die

first_imgTristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netThere wasn’t a hint of despair or desperation as the Ateneo Blue Eagles left the Mall of Asia Arena Saturday night. Losing a late 10-point lead and their twice-to-beat advantage in the narrow 61-62 defeat to the Far Eastern U Tamaraws hardly put a dent on the Eagles’ confidence heading into their do-or-die encounter tomorrow in the Final Four of UAAP Season 79 at Smart Araneta Coliseum. ADVERTISEMENT EDITORS’ PICK Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 Whatever momentum the Eagles built over the course of their second-round resurgence may have been snapped by the resilient Tamaraws, but Ateneo standout Thirdy Ravena sees no reason to panic despite their endgame woes. “It’s not yet done,” said Ravena, who finished with 10 points in Game 1.  “We have another game on Wednesday. It’s just the half. We don’t come out in the dugout of the half hanging our heads. We have to stay positive and of course prepare for what they’re about to do.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliRavena hit two late triples that ultimately fell short as the Tamaraws, crashing the boards with impunity and attacking the lane with confidence in the final period, completed the comeback from 39-49 down in the fourth quarter. Ateneo coach Tab Baldwin felt his team played out of character in the final minutes of the series opener. Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes TNT rookie Pogoy earns minutes with defense Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esportscenter_img For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. “I’m not sure if it’s overconfidence but we could have taken Game 1,” said Ravena. “Everybody makes mistakes and sometimes you just can’t avoid it.” The Eagles know there will be little room for error in the do-or-die clash tomorrow.“We have a lot to work on but on Wednesday hopefully we get the job done,” said Ravena.  “We didn’t play with the sort of composure and experience that we think we have developed over the course of the season,” said Baldwin. “We have to make sure it won’t happen again.”Aaron Black, who led the Eagles in scoring anew with 11 points in 14 minutes, noted Ateneo didn’t play to its strengths in the endgame. “Basically, we didn’t stick to what we’re supposed to be, being the No. 2 defensive team in the league,” said Black, who hit seven straight points to start the fourth period before he was recalled  to the bench by Baldwin. “We didn’t stick to that along with the rebounding. That’s what we stressed after the game.”La Salle plays the winner of the FEU-Ateneo clash in Game 1 of the best-of-three finals starting Saturday. ADVERTISEMENT Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise MOST READ We are young Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Senators to proceed with review of VFA View commentslast_img read more

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We Not Me: Abueva gives credit to teammates after close win

first_imgSmart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH MOST READ Senators to proceed with review of VFA “We shouldn’t be contented with these two wins. We need to improve more in our coming games. We have big games against Ginebra and TNT this year, so we really have to prepare for them while we’re still in this year because we don’t know what lies ahead in 2017.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next EDITORS’ PICK Tiger Woods signs deal to play with new golf ball Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Though he only had nine points, all of which came in the first half, the energetic forward focused on doing the dirty work in the final two frames, setting up his teammates and making crucial stops as the Aces pulled off a pulsating 81-79 victory over Meralco on Wednesday.“In the second half, my mindset was to focus on my defense and passing,” he said, as he also hauled down seven rebounds and five assists in the win.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliProviding those numbers isn’t as easy as Abueva makes it look, more so that the Aces are missing big men Sonny Thoss and Nonoy Baclao due to injuries, leaving the responsibility to Abueva, Vic Manuel, and other forwards to man the paint.But the Kapampangan dynamo isn’t one to offer excuses, focusing on what he can do rather than dwell on deficiencies.center_img We are young PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughter It’s really hard because we’re just average in height, but our speed is there. If their big man goes to the post, we need double him. Our aggressiveness really comes out when it comes to our rotation.”True to the Aces’ “We Not Me” mantra, Abueva said that the whole team did their part to bring home the come-from-behind win as Alaska roared back from a nine-point hole with less than four minutes left in the game.“It’s not just me who worked, but it’s all of us. In my own little way, I helped my teammates improve and that’s why our rotation was better in the last seconds. We were down seven in the crucial stretch in the final two minutes but luckily our point guards made their shots.”RJ Jazul, JVee Casio, and Chris Banchero drained clutch treys to complete the comeback, with the final one putting them ahead with four seconds left on the clock.But Abueva believes that Alaska shouldn’t be content with the two-game streak that puts them at 2-2 with tough games ahead to wrap up this year.ADVERTISEMENT Calvin Abueva showed once again that he doesn’t need to score to help Alaska win.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND View commentslast_img read more

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Is REDD ready for its closeup? Reports vary

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Avoided Deforestation, Carbon Emissions, Carbon Offsets, Carbon Sequestration, Climate Change, Conservation, Emission Reduction, Environment, Global Warming, Rainforest Conservation, Redd center_img As the world’s governments look to curb global warming, protecting what’s left of Earth’s tropical forests is crucial. That means REDD+ could have a huge role to play — but debate is currently raging as to whether or not REDD-based projects can actually deliver the level of emissions reductions necessary to avert runaway global climate change.Many REDD+ projects are built around the idea of carbon offsetting. In a recent investigative article, ProPublica’s Lisa Song writes that, despite their enormous appeal, carbon offsetting programs don’t always lead to the emissions reductions they’re meant to produce.In “case after case,” Song writes, she found “carbon credits hadn’t offset the amount of pollution they were supposed to, or they had brought gains that were quickly reversed or that couldn’t be accurately measured to begin with.”However, the ProPublica report has been criticized by advocates of carbon credit schemes who say that Song has failed to tell the whole story. Earlier this year, it was announced that Indonesia would receive the first installment of a total $1 billion in funds pledged by Norway to preserve the Southeast Asian nation’s tropical forests. Brazil was also set to be paid $96 million, in this case by the UN’s Green Climate Fund, for the emissions avoided by the South American country’s efforts to reduce Amazonian deforestation rates between 2014 and 2015.Both of these were results-based payouts made under the auspices of the UN’s program for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, known as REDD+. As the world’s governments look to curb global warming, protecting what’s left of Earth’s tropical forests is crucial. That means REDD+ could have a huge role to play — but debate is currently raging as to whether or not REDD-based projects can actually deliver the level of emissions reductions necessary to avert runaway global climate change.REDD+ programs can work in a variety of ways. As opposed to wealthy countries and businesses paying developing tropical forest countries directly for proven emissions reductions from reduced deforestation, many are built around carbon offsetting. The idea is that if companies, governments, and anyone else looking to reduce their carbon footprint purchases “carbon credits” to support conservation efforts in forests around the world, those forests will continue to sequester carbon instead of being cut down and releasing their carbon into the atmosphere — and the emissions resulting from the carbon credit-purchasers’ own activities are, in theory, canceled out.A recent article by ProPublica’s Lisa Song explains that these types of offset schemes have enormous appeal: “The appetite is global. For the airline industry and industrialized nations in the Paris climate accord, offsets could be a cheap alternative to actually reducing fossil fuel use.” But Song writes that she found these offsets do not always lead to the emissions reductions they’re meant to produce: “[T]he desperate hunger for these carbon credit plans appears to have blinded many of their advocates to the mounting pile of evidence that they haven’t — and won’t — deliver the climate benefit they promise.”A high-profile example cited by Song is the Suruí Forest Carbon Project in the Brazilian state of Rondônia, the world’s first major indigenous-led forest conservation and voluntary offsetting program, designed to prevent five million tons of carbon emissions or more over the course of 30 years. The project was suspended last year, after a surge of illegal miners and loggers invaded the the Paiter-Suruí tribe’s land — sometimes aided and abetted by members of the tribe who felt their community was not receiving a fair share of the benefits of the program.Though the Suruí Forest Carbon Project was developed entirely outside the framework of REDD+, Song says she looked into REDD-based offset projects “going back two decades and spanning the globe” and considered “findings from academic researchers in far-flung forest villages, studies published in obscure journals, foreign government reports and dense technical documents” in order to examine the track record of voluntary emissions offsetting programs. ProPublica also commissioned an analysis of satellite data to determine how much forest remains in a conservation area in the state of Acre, Brazil that started selling offset credits in 2013. “Four years later, only half the project areas were forested,” Song reports.In “case after case,” Song writes, she found “carbon credits hadn’t offset the amount of pollution they were supposed to, or they had brought gains that were quickly reversed or that couldn’t be accurately measured to begin with.” In effect, she concludes, these offset programs have given polluters “a guilt-free pass to keep emitting CO₂, but the forest preservation that was supposed to balance the ledger either never came or didn’t last.”Larry Lohmann, a researcher who has studied carbon credits for two decades, told Song that, “Offsets themselves are doing damage.” Princeton researcher Timothy Searchinger told Song that carbon offsetting is “the worst possible idea — except for everything else.” According to Song, Searchinger added that these offset programs simply haven’t yet been able to generate enough funds to succeed, mainly because carbon credits are currently sold primarily on voluntary markets — a common argument made by proponents of offsets.Song’s conclusions based on her investigation were far more skeptical of the entire premise of offsets, however: “My visit to Acre suggested that even the best REDD program in the world was running into practical, political and scientific obstacles that couldn’t be fixed with funding alone — another warning sign on top of the reports concluding earlier programs hadn’t worked.”However, the ProPublica report has been criticized by advocates of carbon credit schemes who say that Song has failed to tell the whole story. David Antonioli and Naomi Swickard, the CEO and Chief Market Development Officer, respectively, of the non-profit organization Verra, posted a response to Song’s report noting that the REDD+ initiative in Acre hasn’t actually obtained third-party certification: “In other words, to date, Acre has not issued a single carbon credit, at least not one that would meet the strict requirements of robust standards like the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS), the standard most often used to certify REDD+ projects around the world.” Verra manages the VCS Program, which was launched in 2006.Antonioli and Swickard say that the ProPublica article fails to mention other key aspects of offsetting schemes, such as buffer mechanisms that can help ensure carbon credits issued through REDD+ programs are permanent. The article also misses the broader goals of REDD+, which is aimed at more than just conserving forests, they add.“One of the key insights we have drawn from the more than 150 REDD+ projects certified by the VCS is that successful projects most often work closely with the communities that live in and around forests to address core livelihood needs,” Antonioili and Swickard write. “In short, REDD+ projects have the potential to transform local forest-based economies so that communities can benefit from healthy and thriving forests, rather than being forced to chop them down.”Amazon rainforest and cattle pasture. Photo by Rhett Butler.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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