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Stream String Cheese Incident Live From Electric Forest

first_imgThe String Cheese Incident is always a staple of Electric Forest Festival, headlining three major performances for a total of six unique sets of music complete with wild theatrics, pyrotechnics and unlikely surprise collaborations, such as last year’s Lauryn Hill Incident.Electric Forest: A Magical Musical Wacky WonderlandIf you can’t make it out to the Forest, stream SCI’s shows from the comfort of your couch, thanks to TourGigs. The three shows will be streamed live on June 26th (8pm-11:45pm), 27th (8:15pm-11:45pm) and 28th (8:30pm-12:45am) here. For Electric Forest’s full lineup and schedule click here.last_img read more

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Fantasy update: Last-minute Charlotte Roval lineup, props advice

first_imgCONCORD, N.C. — William Byron is on the pole for Sunday’s Bank of America Roval 400 (2:30 p.m. ET, NBC/NBC Sports App, PRN, SiriusXM NASCAR Radio). Is the young Hendrick Motorsports driver worthy of a lineup spot considering he is on the NASCAR Playoffs bubble to advance to the Round of 12? And how should you navigate the playoff game format? We’ve dissected the numbers to offer a suggested lineup worthy of your Fantasy Live consideration.PLAY NOW: Set your lineup | How the game works | Tips to set your lineupRJ Kraft’s Fantasy Live lineup for race day at Charlotte:Playoff driver 1: Kyle LarsonPlayoff driver 2: Clint BowyerNon-playoff driver 1: Jimmie JohnsonNon-playoff driver 2: Matt DiBenedettoGarage: William ByronRELATED: Odds for Charlotte | Lap averages | Weekend previewAnalysis: This is an elimination race for the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series Playoffs, so it is important to know the agendas. Kyle Busch, Kevin Harvick and Martin Truex Jr. are locked into the Round of 12, while Brad Keselowski, Joey Logano and Denny Hamlin are pretty much set to advance as well — but have not yet mathematically clinched their spots. With that said, I am avoiding those drivers for the most part because I am placing a premium on the drivers who need stage points and points to advance. Truex would have been the one exception to that rule — due to his Round of 16 hot streak and past road-course success — but a blown motor in final practice will drop him to the rear for an engine change.I am all-in for chasing stage points in this race and targeting drivers who need to grab points to advance. So that puts Byron, Kyle Larson, Clint Bowyer, Ryan Blaney and Chase Elliott squarely in my crosshairs. Larson has looked like one of the best cars in practice and led the most laps here last year, so I am playing him. Bowyer’s combination of solid 1.5-mile results and road-racing ability plugs him into my lineup, too. Plus, at just four points out, I expect him to be on the aggressive end for stage points. For the garage, I want to take Elliott because he had the best car in final practice and is only starting 19th because he mucked up the qualifying lap Friday. That said, though, I am taking Byron in the garage as a pure stage-points play since he is starting from the pole. He was aggressive on the stage-points front at Sonoma Raceway and I expect more of the same Sunday.On the non-playoff side, I am taking Jimmie Johnson for one spot. He qualified fourth, ran well here last year and has had speed in recent weeks. The seven-time champion had an incident in final practice, but the team worked to repair the damage to avoid going to a backup. My second spot was a choice between Matt DiBenedetto and Chris Buescher. The JTG Daugherty Racing driver has the better starting spot, but I like DiBenedetto’s road record a bit more.For the bonus picks, I am taking Logano to win Stage 1, Elliott to win Stage 2 and Larson for the win with Chevrolet as the manufacturer.Each week in this space, we’ll also highlight two Props Challenge items for players.MORE: Need Props help? The Action Network has you covered | Play the Props Challenge today1. Which Team Penske driver will finish higher: Brad Keselowski or Ryan Blaney? Blaney has had two top-five finishes at road courses in 2019, and Keselowski has one top-10 finish. Blaney also won this race last year, and Keselowski was involved in a late-race wreck. I am taking BLANEY on this one, based on the better road record this year.2. O/U 3.5 drivers earn at least 10 stage points. I am big on the OVER here. In last year’s race, six drivers (Larson, Kurt Busch, Bowyer, Elliott, Johnson and Blaney) all got at least 10 stage points. Factor in that a slew of drivers starting in the top 10 are likely to be players on that front to improve their playoff position, I feel even better about taking the over on this one.6.2.5last_img read more

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SMC Dance Marathon supports children’s hospital

first_imgIn preparation for the Dance Marathon at Saint Mary’s, scheduled to take place April 5, the team of Belles organizing the event is working on spreading awareness and raising money throughout the South Bend community. The Dance Marathon is a student-led fundraiser, benefitting Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis. President and senior Ellen Smith said a group of young women who wanted to bring the pure magic of Dance Marathon to campus started the event nine years ago. “So far we have almost 130 girls registered for the Marathon,” Smith said. “We are hoping to at least double that number by the date of our Marathon.” Smith said one of her major goals for this year’s Dance Marathon is to continue to increase the knowledge and awareness of the event’s cause to her classmates. “I believe that raising all the money that we can is incredibly important to saving the lives of children who cannot help the cards that they were dealt,” Smith said. “In addition to raising that money, I believe that it is equally important that we convey to the best of our ability why we do Dance Marathon. In addition to money, we can send the children and families at Riley our love, positive energy and support.” Co-fundraising executives and seniors Erin Nanovic and Christa McColl are in charge of raising awareness for Dance Marathon through various events and fundraisers, such as the For the Kids 5K in the fall semester and Riley Week in the spring semester, Nanovic said. She said one of the fundraisers took place last week, an event called Stop the Bop. “Hoedown Throwdown” played on repeat in the Noble Family Dining Hall during lunch on Monday, Wednesday and Friday of Riley Week, Nanovic said. Nanovic said the main goal of Riley Week is to make as many people aware of Dance Marathon and Riley Hospital for Children as possible.“Most of the students react well, and they will even sing along. I saw a few people dance, I may have been one of them,” Nanovic said. “When we play, what we call ‘annoying’ songs in the dining hall on repeat, we receive a lot of attention. If we raised $350, we would turn the song off.“Of course, we always have a handful of people who complain, but we just do our best to remind people that we do all of this for the kids. My hope is that most people understand that and are willing to support our efforts.”Nanovic said along with Stop the Bop, Dance Marathon also teamed up with Chipotle for a giveback night.“We love to do giveback nights because these types of events get the community more involved,” she said. “For this giveback night, we were so blessed to find out Chipotle was not only willing to participate, but they were willing to give us 50 percent of any proceeds on Thursday night of Riley Week. “I went around 6:30 p.m., and I waited in line for over 30 minutes. I was so excited to see so many people waiting to get their Chipotle. There were even points where the line was wrapped around three times and still out the door. It was insane but so great to see everyone coming out to support Dance Marathon and Riley.”Another upcoming fundraiser is “canning” at Sam’s Club, Nanovic said. “We are so grateful that Sam’s Club allows us to do this. We take our red Riley buckets and stand outside the doors of Sam’s Club to take donations,” she said. “We meet so many people from the community who either have a personal connection with Riley or are simply incredibly supportive of the cause.” Canning at Sam’s Club will occur this Friday from 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m., Feb. 28 from 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. and March 2 from 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.Nanovic said each person on the executive board aims to raise at least $750, but the team harbors more than monetary goals.“Personally, I want to exert all of my efforts into planning the best Dance Marathon yet,” she said. “It is an indescribable feeling to see the smiling faces of children who you have helped by dedicating much of your time into raising money and awareness for Riley. “There are so many times when I can get caught up in my own issues and problems, but as soon as I focus on Dance Marathon, I remember that my homework that is due the next day is such a minor issue compared to a child fighting an illness in a hospital.” Nanovic said she also looks forward to the good food and company associated with the event.“Everyone who participates in Dance Marathon is full of life and so happy to be there. The feeling is contagious,” she said.Vice president and senior Hannah Karches said the team will advertise all upcoming events on the Saint Mary’s Dance Marathon Club website and Twitter accounts as well as through flyers on campus.   Karches said her personal goals for Dance Marathon are to increase attendance at the event and to raise awareness for Riley Hospital. “Although we hope to raise money to support the hospital, I want other students to experience the marathon and to understand why the committee members work so hard to make Dance Marathon a success,” she said. Tags: Dance Marathonlast_img read more

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first_img View Comments SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17 WHAT A GENTLEMAN! Opening night has arrived for Tony winner Jefferson Mays’ latest tour-de-force, juggling eight roles in the new musical A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder. Bryce Pinkham plays the would-be murderer in this hilarious rom centering on the battle to inherit a British earldom. ALSO: If/Then’s Idina Menzel and Evita alum Ricky Martin visit Live With Kelly and Michael; Far From Heaven original cast recording is released; Jennifer Ashley Tepper’s book Untold Stories of Broadway is published. Get out your calendars, folks, because it’s time to make note of the hottest openings and theatrical events on and off Broadway! This week, the Tony-nominated stars of Side Show head (separately) to 54 Below, Billy Crystal celebrates his second Broadway opening, two new musicals take their official bows, and more. TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12 ALICE RIPLEY LOOKS BACK—AND FORWARD The always unpredictable Alice Ripley is returning to 54 Below with a brand new evening, Ripley Reflects, and we can’t wait to see what this Tony-winning star has up her musical sleeve! Look for tunes from Tommy, Side Show, Susnset Boulevard, The Rocky Horror Show and Next to Normal, plus original tunes. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 11 ROCKY OFFERS A KNOCKOUT PREVIEW Broadway.com Editor-in-Chief Paul Wontorek moderates an invitation-only sneak peek at the forthcoming Broadway musical Rocky, featuring performances by title star Andy Karl and Margo Seibert. If you’re one of the lucky winners of our social media ticket giveaway, we’ll see you there! ALSO: Michael Cerveris, Constantine Maroulis, Lesli Margherita and more headline the Rockers on Broadway 20 benefit at (le) Poisson Rouge; Two-time Tony nominee Vivian Reed plays 54 Below; original cast recording of London’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory gets its U.S. release; Billy Crystal visits Late Night With Jimmy Fallon. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14 LET THE SUNSHINE IN With a score by William Finn, a book by James Lapine and a cast led by Tony nominees Will Swenson, Stephanie J. Block and Rory O’Malley, Little Miss Sunshine is one of the most anticapted shows of the fall season. Hop on the bus with the Hoover family at Second Stage Theatre, where the musical officially opens tonight. ALSO: Off-Broadway comedy Every Day a Visitor opens at the Clurman Theatre; Broadway vets Margaret Colin, Johanna Day and Jordan Gelber guest-star on Elementary, Joel Grey and Brooke Shields are named “Living Landmarks” at the New York Landmarks Conservancy’s gala at the Plaza.center_img ALSO: Broadway vets Taye Diggs, Terrence Howard and Sanaa Lathan light up the big screen in The Best Man Holiday. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13 BERNADETTE, JEREMY & NORM SING SONDHEIM In an exciting musical collaboration, Jazz at Lincoln Center music director Wynton Marsalis reimagines more than two dozen Sondheim songs in A Bed and a Chair: A New York Love Affair at New York City Center. Bernadette Peters, Norm Lewis, Jeremy Jordan and Cyrille Aimee headline this exciting Encores! concert event, directed by John Doyle. ALSO: Luce ends its LCT3 run at the Claire Tow Theater; Jarrod Spector gives his final concert at 54 Below. ALSO: Patrick Barlow’s adaptation of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol begins performances at Theatre at St. Clement’s; Lin-Manuel Miranda, Christopher Jackson & the guys of Freestyle Love Supreme perform hip-hop improv at Joe’s Pub; last chance to see Tony winner Paulo Szot at 54 Below. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15 OH, WHAT A BEAUTIFUL CURLY Get your DVR ready for one of Hugh Jackman’s early musical triumphs, as PBS broadcasts Trevor Nunn’s 1999 National Theatre production of Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Oklahoma!. Jackman leasds the cast as Curly, with Josefina Gabrielle as Laurey and future Tony winner Shuler Hensley as poor Jud Fry. O-K-L-A-H-O-M-A, Oklahoma! Yeeow! SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16 AN APPLE A DAY MAKES US LOVE OFF-BROADWAY Regular Singing, the final of Richard Nelson’s four topical dramas centering on the Apple siblings of Rhinebeck, NY, begins previews at the Public Theater. Set on the 50th anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s assassination, the play will officially open on that date, November 22. ALSO: Billy Crystal opens on Broadway in 700 Sundays; first off-Broadway previews for Stars of David (at DR2) and Shea: Prince of Christmas (at St. Luke’s); Emily Skinner and Katie Rose Clarke offer solo concerts at 54 Below; Laura Benanti guest-stars on Law & Order: SVU; last chance to see Il Divo and Heather Headley’s Musical Affair at Broadway’s Marquis Theatrelast_img read more

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New DR incinerator provides safer burning for homeowners

first_imgCountry Home Products,DR Power Equipment today introduced the BurnCage, a new home and garden incinerator that eliminates all the shortcomings of burning in a traditional burn barrel.For years, homeowners have relied on backyard burning in steel barrels to eliminate items such as sensitive financial documents and yard debris. Although 55-gallon steel barrels may seem like safe receptacles to contain a fire, they were designed for chemical and hazardous waste storage.‘Burn barrels are a nuisance to property owners,’said DR Power Equipment product manager Carl Eickenberg. ‘These barrels rust, are unpleasant to look at, and don’t provide a safe enclosure to contain flying embers. The new BurnCage is easy-to-use, much safer than a burn barrel, and has perforations for more thorough burning with easier clean up. And it doesn’t rust and become an eyesore like an oil drum.’Here are some of the BurnCage’s key features:Completely enclosed, perforated design ‘contains flying embers while providing excellent airflow to create optimal conditions for burning. The result is burn temperatures of up to 1600 ° F, which turns household combustibles into a fine, powder-like ash.Folds flat for easy transportation and storage- Unlike steel drums, which sit out in the open and rust, the BurnCage has formed corner hinges which allow the barrel to fold flat into a neat stack less than an inch thick, making it easy to move and store. Overall dimensions measure 35″ x 20″ x 20″.11-gauge type 439 stainless steel construction ‘this durable, corrosion resistant steel was developed for high-heat applications such as furnaces and automobile mufflers, withstands temperatures over 2000°F.4,000 cubic inch capacity ‘holds 1,100 cubic inches more than steel drums.Suggested uses for the BurnCage home incineratorinclude burning unwanted leaves, financial documents, and household waste. The BurnCage is available for purchase directly through DR Power Equipment at http://www.drpower.com/burncage(link is external).Vergennes, Vermont (PRWEB) August 14, 2012last_img read more

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Who knows if public defenders’ clients are indigent or not?

first_img January 15, 2010 Jan Pudlow Senior Editor Regular News Who knows if public defenders’ clients are indigent or not? Who knows if public defenders’ clients are indigent or not? Senior EditorWhen Florida’s overburdened public defenders are appointed to represent people charged with crimes, are their new clients really too poor to hire their own attorneys? Sen. Victor Crist, R-Tampa, chair of the Criminal and Civil Justice Appropriations Committee, wants to find out.Currently, he said, nothing is being done to verify information on the one-page “application for criminal indigent status” form that those accused of crimes fill out, along with paying a $50 application fee.“Why don’t we just save some time and ask them to fill out a form on whether they are guilty or innocent?” Crist asked during his committee’s December 8 meeting.“We have an agency that is very, very valuable, that has a workload that’s unbelievable. We have a shrinking budget, and we have a constitutional requirement to ensure access to the courts and representation of all individuals, especially those who cannot afford counsel,” Crist said.“We are trusting, basically, the arrested person and taking their word that what they are telling us is truthful right up front.”On the receiving end of Crist’s words was Eighth Circuit Public Defender C. Richard Parker, standing at the podium representing the Florida Public Defender Association.Parker recalled there used to be a Statewide Indigency Examiner Program, but he thought that it was disbanded because it cost more to administer the program than the savings reaped by ferreting out the few unqualified public defender clients, and a very low number of cases were actually turned back. Parker said the judges are the “final arbiters” of who is appointed the public defender.In a special session in December 2001, the Legislature eliminated $979,313 total for indigency examiners in each circuit. According to a report from the Office of Program Policy and Government Analysis, the program was dropped because it was “not operating as the Legislature intended” and was “characterized by uneven implementation and statewide fragmentation.”In some circuits, court bailiffs filled out the affidavits with minimal information or handed the paperwork to defendants to complete. Overall, examiners only reviewed a small percentage of affidavits. The accounting was so inaccurate that one circuit reported “280 percent of defendants” were determined to be indigent.“With better direction, the program may be able to pay for itself statewide through costs avoided as a result of inappropriate public defender appointments,” the December 2001 OPPAGA report concluded.That’s what Crist wants to explore. He is directing his staff to find out how much money is generated by the $50 filing fee and what it would cost to do a “reasonable background check that at least is of the level that would be done if you were going to buy a car or rent an apartment.”Crist suggested options may include increasing the filing fee to cover additional costs for background checks or to “peel off a piece of that fee and use it for a background check.”Parker pointed out that the money generated by the $50 filing fee goes into the Public Defenders Indigent Trust Fund that helps pay the bills in the public defenders’ offices, already beset by crippling budget cuts since October 2007 and an unanticipated shortfall in the collection of traffic fines.The 2009 Legislature allowed the public defenders to receive 100 percent of funds generated by the indigency application fee. Parker said they can’t afford to lose any of that money. To use part of the filing fee dollars for financial background checks would amount to another budget cut for the public defenders, he stressed.“You are defending your operating budget, and you are depending on that fee,” Crist nodded. “What I am saying is maybe we need to take a look at what would be a reasonable use of that fee. And if it is a reduction in your budget to work with you in assuring that it’s covered somewhere else in the budgetary process.“But we need to be doing at least a basic check to assure that these individuals are truly indigent. You look down in Miami, and you’ve got some big drug dealer that hasn’t filed a financial statement or a tax return and has a 100-foot yacht and a Bentley. I mean, there’s some assets there. And one way to find out is to run a title check on a car and a marine registration. And guess what? We have an auction.”Parker responded: “There are many things I don’t want to do, and probably the last thing is representing someone who doesn’t qualify. I have no fundamental disagreement with the idea of verifying eligibility.”Sen. Arthenia Joyner, D-Tampa, a member of the committee, said after the meeting: “There will be some people who exaggerate or not be exactly truthful about the amount, but when you weigh it out, I don’t think it’s practical to spend more to find out.”Over in the Fourth Circuit, Public Defender Matt Shirk seized upon the issue during his election campaign.“I know it’s a problem in this circuit. Certainly, it is a problem statewide. How big of a problem, you don’t know, because there’s no way to measure that,” Shirk said, adding he has 72 lawyers and more than 60,000 apply for the public defenders’ services every year.When he was an assistant public defender, Shirk said he had clients “driving a Mercedes or a BMW, and you just knew they shouldn’t get a free lawyer. My predecessor had a different philosophy and thought we shouldn’t deal with it. But when I was elected, I made appointments with the county and circuit judges to get them thinking the right way. We are making headway.”One change that seems to be working, Shirk said, is having the judges at first appearance ask defendants: “Will you be hiring your own lawyer?” instead of asking “Will you need the services of the public defender?”That way, Shirk said, the public defender doesn’t “waste time and money opening a file.” Also, he said, the clerk was using the wrong form that didn’t ask for an accounting of assets. “There needs to be more accountability. Absolutely!” Shirk said. He’s telling his assistant public defenders to bring it up if they “see something not right.”“We have had to file motions to withdraw. I always tell the story of a kid in juvenile delinquency court. His parents lived in a posh, gated community but didn’t want to hire an attorney to represent their son.”In nearly a year he’s been in office, Shirk said, “People are realizing it is the right thing to do, especially in this economic climate and with budget shortfalls.”Collection amounts in Shirk’s office from July through December 2009 were $269,515, up from $192,246 from the same six-month period a year earlier.Fourth Circuit PD Public Information Officer Matt Bisbee attributed that to the change in statute that allows the office to keep 100 percent of the $50 application fee, rather than 25 percent of the previous $40 fee.“We expect these numbers to grow with implementation of an aggressive collection program we expect to launch in 2010,” he said.last_img read more

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Infill Residential Opportunities Prompt New Joint Venture

first_imgThe recovering Phoenix homebuilding market has flexed its muscle once again, prompting a new joint venture that links local real estate development veterans Steven Pritulsky and Paul Timm, and their company New Leaf Communities, with long-time Southern California-based builder Watt Communities.The venture, Watt Communities of Arizona, has closed on two infill townhome community sites—one in central Tempe and another in the Biltmore area—that will bring the infill residential experience of Watt Communities to Arizona.The joint venture is evaluating other sites in key Phoenix area urban infill markets as well, with the goal of developing many more quality, attached for-sale communities.“We are firm believers in the power of local industry expertise. It is one of the best ways to understand the direction and needs of a market,” said Watt Communities President Howard Press. “New Leaf brings that expertise to this joint venture and Watt, in turn, brings deep-rooted success in urban residential infill development. The combination will allow us to acquire land and build wisely and precisely, according to what metro Phoenix homebuyers are seeking.”“We anticipate a pipeline of Watt-New Leaf deals that will take advantage of some very unique land positions in Metro Phoenix and bring new, quality living options and innovative product designs into our urban cores,” said Pritulsky, who serves as New Leaf Communities President and CEO. “We are thrilled to have Watt as a partner.”Two sites previously acquired by New Leaf have been purchased by the new venture. The company’s “Dorsey” project is located on 3 acres in central Tempe, Ariz., just south of the southwest corner of Broadway Road and Dorsey Lane, and within minutes of the Loop 101, Loop 202 and US 60 Superstition freeways. In the planning stage now, the venture intends to develop a 54-unit for-sale townhome community. When completed, the project will be complimented by other existing uses within Dorsey Crossing, a mixed-use residential, office and commercial services development.The venture’s “Biltmore” project site is located less than a mile south of 24th Street and Camelback Road, and the Biltmore Fashion Square. It totals 1.7 acres south of Glenrosa Avenue between 26th and 27th streets. The site is a mile east of the 51 Freeway and just three miles north of Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport. Like the Tempe location, the Biltmore site is planned for townhome development, with 29 units envisioned for the project.Both properties will offer contemporary, three-story urban townhomes ranging in size from 1,400 to 1,800 square feet, and each with its own two-car garage. Community amenities will include gated entry, pool/ramada/sundeck, outdoor poolside kitchen and landscaped paseos throughout. Pricing for the new projects will be released as the communities near completion.“These are urban locations within established employment cores, and our projects will match the quality and the vibrancy of these neighborhoods,” said Timm, who serves as New Leaf Communities Chief Operating Officer. “They will allow Phoenix residents to move from renting to owning, without giving up any of their urban lifestyle.”last_img read more

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7 Reasons Your Brain Can’t Spot A Liar

first_imgThe Huffington Post: Think you’re adept at calling someone’s bluff? Convinced you can spot a liar from halfway across the room? You’re probably wrong, says a recent study published in the journal Psychological Science in the Public Interest.According to the research, led by psychologist Aldert Vrij of the University of Portsmouth in the UK, several factors contribute to our inability to tell when we’re being deceived. Have you fallen victim to one (or more) of them?Find out all 7 reasons here: The Huffington Postlast_img read more

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first_imgShare Share on Facebook Pinterest “Since the 1960s, we have seen the religious differences between the parties to shift from differences based on religious tradition (broadly, what religion people are) to differences based on religiosity (how religious people are),” he explained. “We were interested in what implications this change might have had for American electoral politics.”“Anecdotally, we know that candidate religiosity has been an important part of the conversation in several recent elections,” Castle explained. “In 2004, some Republicans suggested that Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry wasn’t ‘orthodox enough’ in the way he practiced his Catholic faith. In 2012, Mitt Romney’s campaign downplayed his strong commitment to his Mormon faith. In 2016, Donald Trump did the opposite, heavily emphasizing his religiosity and appearing with well-known Christians like Jerry Falwell, Jr.”“The fact that religiosity has been so important to both candidates and political observers suggested that we needed to understand the dynamics behind its relationship to party more clearly,” Castle said.Castle and his colleagues analyzed data from nearly 3,000 respondents who participated in the 2009 Cooperative Congressional Election Study, a national survey.Respondents were presented with a profile and a brief quote from a fictional state legislative candidate. The candidate’s party was varied to be either Democrat, Republican, or not mentioned. The short quote was varied to be either moderately religious, strongly religious, avowedly secular, or unrelated to religion. The fictional candidate’s purported policy agenda never changed.“We build a theory that candidates’ levels of religiosity should impact voter support. Specifically, highly religious candidates (regardless of party) should receive greater support from Republicans and cultural conservatives, reduced support from Democrats and cultural progressives, even after accounting for religious differences in the make-up of the party coalitions. The dynamic is the reverse among Democrats: secular candidates should be more attractive to Democrats/cultural progressives and less appealing to Republicans/cultural conservatives.” The results of the survey confirmed the researchers’ hypothesis. “Overall, we see strong evidence that a candidate’s level of religiosity conditions the impact of party identification and cultural issue attitudes,” Castle remarked.Being strongly religious increased support among Republicans while decreasing support among Democrats. Being secular, on the other hand, decreased support among Republicans but increased support among Democrats.“The results have a number of implications for American politics,” Castle said. “First, they suggest that there is still a strong bias against secular candidates. In particular, we saw that Republicans had sharply negative reactions to the secular Republican candidate — in this treatment, the effect of party identification on candidate preference disappeared almost entirely. Second, the dynamics behind the paper suggest that candidates who do not fit their party’s ‘typical’ profile will struggle to get elected. This homogeneity within parties could be one contributing factor to the increasing polarization of the parties in Congress.”Castle said a major caveat of the study was that respondents were only presented with one candidate at a time. “Thus, we cannot say at this stage how a candidate’s level of religiosity might affect support in a two candidate environment,” he explained. “For example, we saw in our experiment that Republican and conservative voters react negatively to a secular Republican. However, based on our data we cannot say how a secular Republican would fare against a highly religious Democrat. Party identification and candidate religiosity are both clearly strong indicators of candidate preference, so it would be interesting to see which matters more when voters are faced with a tough choice.”The study, “Survey Experiments on Candidate Religiosity, Political Attitudes, and Vote Choice” was also co-authored by Geoffrey C. Layman, David E. Campbell, and John C. Green. Emailcenter_img LinkedIn A candidate’s religious affiliation has been shown to influence American voters. But a new study reveals that a candidate’s religiosity — meaning how dedicated they are to their faith — also influences voters.The study in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion suggests that voters use a candidate’s religiosity to infer the candidate’s partisanship and his or her positions on cultural issues. The study also suggests that secular candidates face a particular disadvantage. Jeremiah J. Castle of Central Michigan University, the study’s corresponding author, told PsyPost that he was interested in researching the topic because of the growing importance of religion in American politics. Share on Twitterlast_img read more

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Well drink to that

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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