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Bristol Night Race qualifying order

first_imgSee the order that drivers will head out for single-car qualifying at Bristol Motor Speedway on Friday evening at 5:35 p.m. ET (NBCSN/NBC Sports App). Click the link here to see the order. Desktop users can click the print icon as well to see the full order.last_img

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New York City Limits Transports of Cardiac Arrest Patients

first_imgFDNY Photo WABC-TV reports the new directive comes as hospitals are dealing with an influx of coronavirus patients. Related: Complete COVID-19 Coverage from JEMS “These orders are binding and the FDNY will devise a plan for implementation,” said Deputy Fire Commissioner Frank Dwyer. Related: Temporal Utilization Trends in Prehospital Mechanical CPR Devices EMS crews are being told if they can’t resuscitate a patient,they should declare the person dead. New guidance for EMS professionals in New York City and LongIsland says cardiac arrest patients should not be transported to hospitals ifthey cannot be saved in the field.last_img read more

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SCC to host inaugural Dance-a-Thon

first_imgJust a few weeks after the Holy Half, Notre Dame will see another kind of marathon come to campus — this time, a dance marathon.From 7 p.m. Friday night until 7 a.m. Saturday morning in South Dining Hall, the class of 2017 Sophomore Class Council (SCC) will host Notre Dame’s first annual Dance-A-Thon, the proceeds of which will benefit Memorial Children’s Hospital in downtown South Bend.SCC Treasurer Neil Joseph said the idea for the fundraiser was derived from the example of a number of universities, including Penn State and Ohio State, which have raised thousands of dollars through month-long campaigns that culminate in massive dance parties.“A lot of other colleges have been doing dance-a-thons to raise money for hospitals in their area, and we just really wanted to do something where we had an impact on our community specifically,” he said.Joseph said all proceeds from the Dance-A-Thon will help to fund the the estimated $10 million expansion of Memorial Children’s Hospital in South Bend, which, according to its website, “treats children with a wide variety of medical and surgical diagnoses from more than 20 referral hospitals throughout Southwestern Michigan and Northern Indiana.”“They [Memorial Children’s Hospital] were really in dire need of this new addition for their pediatric unit, and so we met with them, and they were really excited,” Joseph said. “We were just thinking big.”SCC President Noemi Ventilla said the Dance-A-Thon will be the second major event hosted by the SCC this year; their first was the Great Gatsby Dance in September.“We did Gatsby in the fall, and we realized that having campus-wide events, bigger events has a lot bigger impact and durability than a lot of the events that class councils do,” she said.But bigger events entail greater commitments of time and resources, and Joseph said organizing the Dance-A-Thon has proved “a huge learning process.”However, Ventilla said the combined efforts of all SCC members — which have fueled a large-scale promotional campaign extending across social media, YouTube and the event’s brand new website — have transformed what began as a distant vision of a dance marathon into an imminent reality.“There are 37 of us [on SCC], so there are 37 people working on it,” she said. “Before then, we had committees, and they did their own thing, but because this is such a huge process, we all came together.”Ventilla said their promotional efforts have already generated a lot of excitement in the community. A variety of sponsors has contributed to the event, and even more organizations have indicated their interest in participating in coming years.“We’re going to have a ton of really great things, but the real potential for this is in the future,” she said.Included in the festivities lined up for this year’s Dance-A-Thon are live performances by student organizations, an inflatable obstacle course, music, free food and, of course, dancing.“It’s an all-night thing, so if you’re coming back to campus at 3 a.m. and don’t have somewhere to go, instead of Taco Bell, come to us,” Ventilla said.Both Ventilla and Joseph said their eventual hope is to create a club which will take over organizing future Dance-A-Thons.For the present, however, Joseph said the SCC’s primary objective is to encourage participation among the student body, both in terms of donations and attendance at the actual event.“We really want people to come out and have fun, and that will set the tone for coming years,” he said.Joseph said students can support the event by donating through a link on the event website (http://nddanceathon.weebly.com),or by texting “Beacon ND” to 20222, which will make an automatic donation of $5 to Memorial Children’s Hospital.He said the SCC will also be collecting donations in person throughout the night.“Every little bit counts,” Joseph said. “It’s kind of corny, but it really does.”Tags: Dance-a-Thon, Memorial Children’s Hospital, SCC, THONlast_img read more

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first_imgAdriana Perez | The Observer CSPL executive director Michael Nicolas Okinczyc-Cruz and senior Kassandra Perez speak at a virtual webinar hosted by the ILS Sept. 21, 2020.The ILS also hosted a virtual book launch Sept. 22 of “A Homegrown Fairytale,” co-authored by Notre Dame Master of Fine Arts alumna Suzi Garcia (‘15).The next ILS event for Hispanic Heritage Month will take place Wednesday at 4:00 p.m. Associate professor of Romance languages and literature Marisel Moreno and professor of Romance languages and literature Thomas Anderson will lead a discussion on their online bilingual exhibit, “El Arte al Servicio del Pueblo,” which translates to “Art at the Service of the People.”The Hispanic Alumni Association (HA of ND) has also planned a panel for Oct. 15, Prisma Garcia (‘09), the vice-chair for HA of ND, said.The panel seeks to connect students with alumni currently working in fields such as business, nonprofit and academia who will “talk about their life as Latinos at Notre Dame and after,” Garcia said.“We didn’t want to compete with what [ILS] was already doing,” Garcia said, expressing HA of ND’s support for ILS programming.Outside of Hispanic Heritage Month, Garcia said HA of ND plans to offer a virtual Spanish mass in the coming months to celebrate Day of the Dead on Nov. 1 and to honor Our Lady of Guadalupe on her feast day Dec. 12, even if virtually.To celebrate this month, the Multicultural Student Programs and Services (MSPS) office has been posting on its Instagram, Facebook and Twitter accounts “highlighting [L]atinx traditions and people who have contributed to our history that folks may or may not know about,” Yvette Rodriguez, assistant director of programming, said in an email to The Observer.Last week, MSPS also shared an opportunity with students to attend a SpeakOut webinar with Michael Benitez Jr. on Sept. 17, entitled “Examining Latinidad: At the Crossroads of Race, Culture and COVID-19.” MSPS is also co-sponsoring the Student Union Board’s Oct. 8 movie watch of “McFarland, USA.”“In general, though, we understand that there are many times other than just within the heritage month that we could be celebrating,” Rodriguez said. “While the spotlight given to these narratives through heritage months is helpful, it is important to weave them in throughout our education, events and lives at other times too …,” Rodriguez said, “as well as acknowledge the educational opportunity that heritage months offer.”According to Fraga, “Notre Dame’s original mission was to educate predominantly working-class, predominantly Catholic, immigrant and immigrant-origin” communities who could not get educated elsewhere.“In focusing on Latinos, Notre Dame is recommitting itself to its original mission,” Fraga said. Tags: 2020 census, Hispanic Alumni Association, Hispanic Heritage Month, ILS, latin america, Latinx In the midst of a pandemic that has disproportionately affected Latino communities and in light of the upcoming census and general election, Notre Dame’s celebration of National Hispanic Heritage Month offers opportunities to celebrate the more than 1,000 University undergraduates who self-identify as Hispanic or Latino.Sept. 15 marked the beginning of this year’s Hispanic Heritage Month in the United States. Luis Fraga, director of the Institute for Latino Studies (ILS), said this celebration aims to recognize the contributions of Hispanic and Latino communities in the nation’s history and society.“The idea behind it is, let’s celebrate the good things as a way to remember how we can make things even better for these communities in the country,” Fraga said.The official celebration of Hispanic heritage in the United States began in 1968 under President Lyndon B. Johnson. Twenty years later, President Ronald Reagan expanded it to a 30-day event spanning Sept. 15 to Oct. 15.The start date was chosen because it coincided with the commemoration of the independence of five Latin American countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In the following days, the independence of other Latin American countries is celebrated too, such as Mexico, Chile and Belize.About two or three years ago, Fraga said the ILS decided to “lead the University” in recognizing this month. Since then, the ILS has organized a series of events between mid-September and mid-October to celebrate Hispanic and Latinx heritage in Notre Dame and the United States.This year, the events hosted by the ILS had to be adapted to a virtual platform due to the pandemic. Registration is required to attend most of these events. In them, alumni, professors and guest speakers from different backgrounds will cover broad topics, from art and poetry to gun violence and border issues.The ILS started their Hispanic Heritage Month event series with a virtual table talk entitled “Latinx Voters in the 2020 Election,” hosted by Fraga and associate professor of political science Ricardo Ramirez. According to the Pew Research Center, a record 32 million Latinos are projected to be eligible to vote in 2020, up from 27.3 million in 2016. The talk is available on the video-sharing platform of Panopto and on the ILS website.So far, the institute has also hosted a panel discussion Sept. 21 with Michael Nicolas Okinczyc-Cruz, executive director of the Coalition for Spiritual and Public Leadership (CSPL), and senior Kassandra Perez, who interned remotely at CSPL this summer. The panel, “Latinx Presence and Power: The 2020 Census and Overcoming the Politics of Erasure,” sought to discuss the significance of the census, the obstacles that Latino communities face and what can be done to ensure these communities are counted.“There’s such a huge impact,” Perez said. “Especially in our Latinx communities, when we don’t fill out the census because the data affects us for the next 10 years.”Perez emphasized that government funding, the drawing of congressional and state legislative districts, business decisions and seats in the House of Representatives are some of the big decisions made based on the census.last_img read more

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Visionary Solutions Releases New Encoder, Decoder With USB-C Connectivity

first_imgVisionary Solutions has announced the release of the PacketAV DUET 2 Encoder and Decoder. According to the company, they are the world’s first AV-over-IP endpoints with built-in USB-C connectivity for distributing 4K UHD Video and Dante/AES67 over Gigabit Ethernet.The new DUET 2 encoders and decoders deliver 4K UHD video, Dante/AES67 connectivity and control, all via a single Main Gigabit LAN port. USB-C connectivity is standard. It offers connection for sharing media via laptop, tablet, phone or other USB-C connected devices, as well as enabling soft-codec integration via driverless USB 2.0 connection to a PC for web conferencing applications such as Zoom, Skype, Webex and Microsoft Teams.DUET 2 endpoints are also equipped with an Ethernet Expansion port, enabling network connectivity for control and managed IP traffic pass-through to remote devices, including projectors, displays, and touch panel controllers. This expansion port also supports Power Over Ethernet (PoE) pass-through to connected devices for added flexibility.DUET 2 units also offer multiple selectable local input sources with HDMI loop-through, enabling automatic switching between USB-C and dual HDMI input sources via input detect mode, or via a programmed control system or web browser.last_img read more

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Board to make Foundation appointment

first_img November 1, 2013 Regular News Board to make Foundation appointmentThe Board of Governors is seeking applicants for the following vacancy to be filled during its January 31, 2014 meeting: The Florida Bar Foundation Board of Directors: Two lawyers to serve three-year terms, commencing July 1, 2014 on this 33-member Board of Directors which administers Florida’s IOTA program. Directors shall be members of the Foundation during their term(s) as directors.Persons interested in applying for this vacancy may click here to download the application and review the “Expectations for Service of Board Members” from the Bar’s website, or may call Bar headquarters at (850)561-5757, to obtain these documents. Completed applications must be submitted to the Executive Director, The Florida Bar, 651 East Jefferson Street, Tallahassee, 32399-2300no later than 5:30 p.m. on Friday, December 13. Resumes will not be accepted in lieu of an application. Board to make Foundation appointmentlast_img read more

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Cassidy Turley Represents Buyer in Purchase of Village at Surprise

first_imgCassidy Turley represented Kierland Village Center, LLC, an affiliate of A&C Properties (Joe Cattaneo, principal,) in the purchase of the Village at Surprise, a ±115,613 SF neighborhood shopping center on the NWC of Litchfield and Bell roads in Surprise.Ryan Schubert and Michael Hackett with Cassidy Turley’s Arizona office represented the buyers in the $6M ($220.55 PSF) purchase of ±27,205 SF, the portion of the center that excludes the Kohl’s anchor space (±88,408 SF). The sellers, PWDAF Bell and Litchfield, LLC, were represented by CBRE.Built in 2004, Village at Surprise is located on ±3.3-acres. In addition to the anchor Kohl’s store (not included in the sale) the Village at Surprise tenants include national retailers Sears Home Appliance, Edible Arrangements, H&R Block, Payless Shoesource, Sports Clips, UPS Store and New York Pizza Department. The retail center was 95% occupied at the time of sale.In another transaction, Cassidy Turley completed the sale of ±39 net acres on the NWC of Higley Rd. and Loop 202/Santan Freeway, a full diamond interchange and the primary entrance for the master planned community of Morrison Ranch.Higley & 202, LLC (Gabel Investments, Inc.) purchased the land for $6.38M from Moat Limited Partnership. The transaction, from listing to closing, was completed in 45 days. Brent Moser, Mike Sutton and Brooks Griffith with Cassidy Turley’s Land Group represented the buyer. Kent Hanson, with Cassidy Turley’s Industrial Group, consulted on the transaction.The property has RU-43 county zoning and the Town of Gilbert’s General Plan shows Business Park. Surrounding amenities include Santan Village Mall, Agritopia and the Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport. Gabel Investments plans to hold the property for investment purposes.last_img read more

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How social media impacts consumer spending

first_imgLinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter For businesses using social media, posts with high engagement have the greatest impact on customer spending, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management.Published in the Journal of Marketing, the study assessed social media posts for sentiment (positive, neutral or negative), popularity (engagement) and customers’ likelihood to use social media, and found the popularity of a social media post had the greatest effect on purchases.“A neutral or even negative social media post with high engagement will impact sales more than a positive post that draws no likes, comments or shares,” says study co-author Ram Bezawada, PhD, associate professor of marketing in the UB School of Management. “This is true even among customers who say their purchase decisions are not swayed by what they read on social media.” Sharecenter_img Pinterest Email The researchers studied data from a large specialty retailer with multiple locations in the northeast United States. They combined data about customer participation on the company’s social media page with in-store purchases before and after the retailer’s social media engagement efforts. They also conducted a survey to determine customers’ attitudes toward technology and social media.The study also found that businesses’ social posts significantly strengthen the effect of traditional television and email marketing efforts. When social media is combined with TV marketing, customer spending increased by 1.03 percent and cross buying by 0.84 percent. When combined with email marketing, customer spending increased by 2.02 percent and cross buying by 1.22 percent. Cross buying refers to when a customer purchases additional products or services from the same firm.“The clear message here is that social media marketing matters, and managers should embrace it to build relationships with customers,” says Bezawada. “Developing a community with a dedicated fan base can lead to a definitive impact on revenues and profits.”Bezawada collaborated on the project with Ashish Kumar, assistant professor of marketing at Aalto University; Rishika Rishika, clinical assistant professor of marketing at the University of South Carolina; Ramkumar Janakiraman, associate professor of marketing at the University of South Carolina; and P.K. Kannan, the Ralph J. Tyser Professor of Marketing Science at the University of Maryland.last_img read more

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Flu Scan for Feb 13, 2014

first_imgNew fatal H10N8 case reported in ChinaHealth officials in China’s Jiangxi province today reported their third recent human case of H10N8 avian flu, which proved fatal, according to a provincial statement in Chinese translated and posted by FluTrackers, an infectious disease news message board.The patient, a 75-year-old man from the capital city of Nanchang, got sick on Feb 4 and was hospitalized with severe pneumonia. He died on Feb 8.The two other recent cases include the first detection in the middle of December, in a 73-year-old woman who died from her infection, and a nonfatal case in a 55-year-old woman whose illness was reported in late January.The virus is low pathogenic in birds but, like the H7N9 virus, appears to cause severe disease in people. A recent study in The Lancet urged health officials not to underestimate the pandemic potential of H10N8.Feb 13 FluTrackers thread Feb 4 CIDRAP News story “Study: H10N8 virus in first human case is novel strain” H5N1 strikes flocks in Cambodia, VietnamCambodia has reported an H5N1 avian flu outbreak at a village in Kampong Cham province, according to a report today from the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE).The virus was detected by animal health officials who were called to investigate sickness and death in the village’s duck flocks. The outbreak began on Feb 7. Of 5,250 susceptible birds, 4,466 deaths were reported, and the remaining 784 ducks were destroyed to curb the spread of the virus.The outbreak was Cambodia’s first since August 2013. The country has reported three H5N1 illnesses in humans so far this year, all in children. Two of the cases, reported yesterday, were in siblings who died from their infections, but one was not tested. The siblings lived in Kampong Cham province.Feb 13 OIE report on Cambodia outbreakElsewhere, Vietnam’s agriculture ministry today reported six H5N1 outbreaks from six different provinces, according to a separate OIE report. They range from Nam Dinh, located in the more northern part of the country, to more southern provinces, including Tay Ninh, Khanh Hoa, Quang Ngai, Kon Tum, and Ca Mau.The outbreak dates range from Feb 7 to Feb 11, affecting village flocks. Of 18,981 susceptible birds, 9,181 died, and the remaining 9,800 were destroyed to control disease spread.Feb 13 OIE report on Vietnam outbreaks H7N3 vaccine trial shows promise, potential for use against H7N9A phase 1 clinical trial of a candidate H7N3 live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) developed in Russia found that two doses were immunogenic and produced antibodies that were reactive not only to wild-type avian H7N3, but also to the new H7N9 virus that is infecting humans in China, according to a study yesterday in PLoS One.A Russian and US team administered two doses of the vaccine to 30 of 40 randomly divided subjects, 10 of them receiving placebo. Among patients who got the LAIV doses, researchers found the majority (86.2%) of vaccine recipients developed serum and local antibody responses and generated antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 memory T cells. They also found that the vaccine was safe and well tolerated.In addition, they found that sera from some of the vaccinated patients prompted an antibody response that was able to neutralize the new H7N9 virus. The team also found clues that most B cells and cytotoxic T cells induced by the H7N3 virus are likely to recognize the H7N9 virus.They concluded that the H7N3 LAIV strain could be used in a priming vaccine strategy in the event of a pandemic until specific H7N9 vaccines are available.Feb 12 PLoS One study Rapid flu tests appear to guide antiviral decisions for outpatientsClinicians in outpatient facilities often use the results of rapid influenza diagnostic tests (RIDTs) in making decisions regarding the use of antivirals, but these decisions are not always in line with treatment guidelines from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), according to a study yesterday in the Journal of Clinical Virology.The authors sent surveys to randomly selected physicians’ offices, emergency departments, and community clinics in 2008 (pre–2009 H1N1 pandemic) and 2010 (post-pandemic) to assess RIDT testing practices; 5,064 surveys were sent in 2008 and 5,063 in 2010. In the post-pandemic survey, questions were included to evaluate any changes in RIDT practices in various risk groups.The response rate was lower in 2010 than in 2008 (18% vs 41%), but a higher percentage of respondents reported RIDT use in 2010 (73%) than in 2008 (20%) for all facility types.In both survey years, antivirals were prescribed for more than two thirds of patients with flu-like symptoms who had a positive RIDT result within 48 hours of onset (69% pre-pandemic, 67% post-pandemic). An “H1N1 effect” was seen in 2010, meaning higher treatment levels in high-risk patients, but the numbers fell short of CDC recommendations (eg, 31% of children under 2 years of age, 23% of children 2 to 5, and 37% of pregnant patients).Feb 12 J Clin Virol abstract Study: Self-applied microneedle vaccine patches well toleratedMost patients attempting self-vaccination with microneedle patches were successful, particularly when a snap-based device was used, and most would prefer to self-vaccinate given the choice, says a study in Vaccine that the authors claim is the first to assess usability and acceptability of the method.The study group comprised 91 venue-recruited adults. They self-administered placebo-containing microneedle patches three times, had one placebo microneedle patch applied by an investigator, and had an intramuscular injection of saline.Those in the first group, comprising 70 participants, were given patches that are applied with thumb pressure alone. Usability was evaluated by counting needle insertion sites after swabbing the skin with stain. They showed wide variability in the number of insertion points as well as a learning curve (more insertion points on the third attempt than the first).The authors took this to mean that subjects needed a device to assist with correct needle insertion, so they repeated the regimen on 21 subjects with devices that snapped shut when the appropriate application pressure was reached.The best usability was attained by those using the snap devices; over three repetitions, this group had a median success rate of 93% to 96% with little variability among individuals. All patch vaccinations were well tolerated.Subjects’ intent to be vaccinated in the next flu season increased from 44% before the trial to 65% afterward (confidence interval, 55% to 74%). Among those expressing an intent to be vaccinated, 76% preferred microneedle-patch vaccination over injection and 64% preferred self-vaccination over patches applied by a healthcare worker. Feb 11 Vaccine abstractlast_img read more

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Flu Scan for Jan 24, 2018

first_imgStudy of Taiwan seniors finds flu vaccine can cut TB riskA large longitudinal study of an elderly population in Taiwan found that flu vaccination reduced the risk of tuberculosis (TB) infection by 18%. Earlier studies, including animal ones, have hinted that flu vaccination might protect against a range of pathogens, including TB, due to activation of T-cell mediated immunity. A team from Taiwan reported the findings yesterday in Emerging Infectious Diseases.The group’s data come from Taiwan’s comprehensive universal health insurance program. The setting provides a unique opportunity to study the disease, because TB has been Taiwan’s most prevalent notifiable infectious disease for decades, and health officials keep track of cases through a national surveillance system. The cohort study from 2005 to 2012 included 99,982 seniors, 64,290 who were vaccinated and 35,692 who were not. Flu vaccination is voluntary in Taiwan.During the study period, 1,141 TB cases were reported, for an incidence of  1.14%. Among vaccinated older people, the team found 142.2 cases per 100,000 person-years, compared with 175.5 cases per 100,000 person-years in the unvaccinated group.After adjusting for demographic factors, concurrent medical conditions, and income level, the group concluded that elderly people in Taiwan who were vaccinated against flu had a lower risk of TB than their unvaccinated peers. They added that given an earlier report that suggested even a partially effective vaccine against TB would reduce the burden of the disease, their new findings suggest that flu vaccination should be offered to seniors to prevent TB infections.Jan 23 Emerg Infect Dis study Nanoparticle universal flu vaccine shows promise in mouse studyA nanoparticle universal flu vaccine designed to protect against a range of influenza A viruses was protective and produced long-lasting immunity in mice, a research team based at Georgia State University (GSU) reported today in Nature Communications.Many experts have called for flu vaccines that are more effective, with gaps in protection in the current flu season, especially against H3N2, and unpredictable pandemic threats, such as from H7N9 in China, underscoring the urgency. In 2012, a team led by the University of Minnesota’s Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP), the publisher of CIDRAP News, pressed for better flu vaccines, emphasizing that new efforts should target viral components other than the head of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein on the virus’s surface, which is always changing, requiring constant reformulation and revaccination.In the new study, researchers designed a vaccine that targets surface glycoproteins on the stalk of the virus, a more conserved part that all influenza viruses share. They assembled the stalk domain into a protein nanoparticle as part of a vaccine.In a press release from GSU, Bao-Zhong Wang, PhD, study coauthor and associate professor in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences, said once the vaccine is given, the nanoparticle protects the antigen protein so it won’t be degraded. “Our immune cells have a good ability to take in this nanoparticle, so this nanoparticle is much, much better than a soluble protein to induce immune response.”To test the effectiveness, the team immunized mice twice intramuscularly, then challenged them with several influenza viruses, including H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, and H7N9. The vaccine provided universal and complete protection against lethal virus exposure and dramatically cut the amount of virus in the lungs.The group’s next goal is to test the nanoparticle vaccine in ferrets, an animal model used for studying human influenza because of the animals’ generally similar clinical signs and respiratory physiology.Jan 24 Nat Commun abstract Jan 24 GSU press releaselast_img read more

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