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HBS holds annual Business Plan Contest

first_imgHarvard Business School (HBS) held the final round of its 11th annual Business Plan Contest late last month in the School’s Burden Auditorium. The contest began this past January with a total of 62 student teams, eight of which made it through the various stages of judging to the final round of presentations. Four of these teams were in the traditional business track and the remaining four were in the social enterprise track, reserved for ventures with a primarily social agenda.The judges, representing an array of venture capital, law, and accounting firms, selected second-year HBS master of business administration candidate Sandra Nudelman and her sister, Michele, a student at Washington University Law School in St. Louis, as the first place winners in the traditional track for their business plan for a product called Judicial Intelligence. A suite of computer-based tools, Judicial Intelligence will help litigators strategically analyze the opinions of judges they will face in court. HBS assistant professor Mukti Khaire served as the team’s faculty adviser.In the social enterprise track, the winning team was Unite for Health! — made up of Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) research fellow Onil Bhattacharyya, HSPH graduate student Lingling Zhang, and Harvard Medial Student Anna Chodos. Looking toward China, the Unite for Health! team hopes to reduce the instances of heart disease in that country by providing training in innovative, simple, and effective treatment and by working with existing neighborhood organizations to promote heart-healthy behavior. Their adviser was Kennedy School of Government lecturer Gordon Bloom.Each first-place team received $10,000 in cash and $10,000 in legal and accounting services. As winners of the traditional track, the Judicial Intelligence team also walked away with the Dubilier Prize, which honors the late Martin Dubilier M.B.A. ’52, cofounder of Clayton, Dubilier, and Rice, one of the premier leveraged buyout firms in the United States. The Peter M. Sacerdote Prize went to the Unite for Health! team. Established by Peter Sacerdote M.B.A. ’64 in honor of his 40th reunion at HBS, the prize fund is meant to encourage Business School students to apply their skills to develop and launch social purpose ventures.Additionally, the judges named a total of four runner-up teams (three from the traditional track and one from the social enterprise track). HBS Professor James Heskett served as a faculty adviser for all three of the traditional track teams, which are listed below.C3 BioEnergy (Tracy Mathews, HBS; Curt Fischer, M.I.T.; Andrew Peterson, M.I.T.) will produce bio-propane for the $21 billion U.S. propane market, offering the only economically competitive, domestically produced, renewable source of this clean-burning fuel.Clear Suppliers (Alex Zhang and Paul Morgenthaler, both of HBS), already in operation in Germany and China, is a global supply chain “infomediary” for manufacturers.Katherine Kwei (Elenor Mak and Ying Soong, both of HBS) is a young luxury handbag company. Their business plan aims to help the company make a mark in this multimillion-dollar industry.HBS senior lecturer Stacey Childress served as the faculty adviser for Charitable Donations Group, the social enterprise runner-up. Charitable Donations Group (Matt Scherrer and Paris Wallace, both of HBS) intends to raise millions of dollars for nonprofits in Boston and other locations by helping them accept and liquidate real estate transactions.All four runners-up received $5,000 in cash and $5,000 in services, plus the Satchu-Burgstone Entrepreneurship Award, endowed by Jon Burstone M.B.A. ’99, Asif Satchu M.B.A. ’99, and Reza Satchu M.B.A. ’96. Named runners-up in the 1999 contest, these alumni went on to achieve commercial success with their plan for SupplierMarket.com, an online marketplace for buying and selling manufactured direct materials.“This contest is especially near and dear to my heart,” said HBS Dean Jay Light. “It reflects the intense interest of our alumni in new ventures. Ten to 15 years after graduation, about half of our alumni describe themselves as entrepreneurs. But the statistics for Business Contest participants go beyond that. Two-thirds of them start their own business only five to seven years after they graduate, and half of that group is working on an idea they first formulated for our Business Plan Contest. Year after year, I am amazed and inspired by the quality of the work I see at this event.”Past participants, for example, have gone on to create successful enterprises such as Bang Networks, a leading provider of technologies and services for using the Internet; Magellan Distribution Corp., an independent distributor of electronic components; Finale, a restaurant in Boston and Cambridge specializing in upscale desserts; and New Leaders for New Schools, a national nonprofit organization devoted to improving education for all children by attracting and preparing the next generation of outstanding leaders for urban public schools.Organized by the HBS Rock Center for Entrepreneurship, the HBS Social Enterprise Initiative, and HBS students in the Entrepreneurship Club and Social Enterprise Club, the Business Plan Contest provides an integrative learning experience for participants, drawing on all facets of the Harvard M.B.A. curriculum. It is one of several special programs funded by the Rock Center, which was created through the generosity of pioneering venture capitalist Arthur Rock M.B.A. ’51.In 2003, Rock donated $25 million to HBS to support the entrepreneurship faculty and their research, fellowships for M.B.A. and doctoral students, symposia and conferences, and new outreach efforts to extend the impact of the School’s extensive work in this field. To further contribute to its research and course development efforts, HBS also established the California Research Center in Silicon Valley in 1997.last_img read more

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NASA Technology to Map The Stars Could Now Help Save World’s Largest Fish

first_imgMORE: Fishermen Rescue Rare Whale From Nets Thanks to New Training ProgramThe spots just behind the whale shark’s fins are unique to each fish, so Norman and company can see where each one travels, breeds, and likes to stay. This is actually typical of biology. Animals like cheetahs and leopards have totally unique coats of spots, and polar bears can be identified even through just the arrangement of their whiskers.CHECK OUT: Scientists Finally Manage to Record the Strange Sounds of the ‘Arctic Unicorn’—the Elusive NarwhalAs space and the ocean remain the final frontiers for scientific exploration, it seems only fitting that such a legendary space explorer as the Hubble Telescope should be used to help plumb the depths of the sea, especially when it’s looking for an animal which in the Malagasy language is known as marokintana, which means “many stars.”HELP Your Friends Space Out to the Good News By Sharing it Online…AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreHigh above our planet, the Hubble Space Telescope has special software for parsing out the details of each individual star it surveys. Now this technology is being turned back towards Earth to help an animal that, while not as big as a star, is still quite a hefty unit.Jeremy BishopDespite being the largest fish in the ocean, whale sharks are one of the least understood of their kind. Marine biologists don’t have good data on their migration patterns, their global hotspots, breeding sites, or if they follow a seasonal food source.It is principally this lack of knowledge that has prevented scientists from being able to develop conservation strategies to protect the animal from sliding further and further towards extinction. Now a new citizen science project utilizes the Hubble’s “Groth” algorithm—normally used for identifying individual stars in the universe—to map photographed-whale sharks’ spotted patterns, of which no two are alike, and therefore effectively act like a fingerprint.The algorithm forms the brain of a new photographic database of whale sharks, the largest ever assembled, that marine biologist Brad Norman of Western Australia’s Murdoch University used to create the Wildbook for Whale Sharks—a library of individually identified sharks that anyone, hobbyist scuba diver, amateur scientist, or professional biologist, can contribute to.“At the start it was just me taking photos of whale sharks at Ningaloo, but we needed more than one lonely researcher to collect enough data over an extended period,” Dr. Norman said in a statement. “And, because tourists were constantly swimming with whale sharks too, why not enlist their support?”“I was fortunate to team up with two brilliant scientists, software guru Jason Holmberg and NASA astrophysicist Zaven Arzoumanian, to develop a user-friendly database where anyone, anywhere can upload their own images of whale sharks.”“We’re talking about an animal considered to be rare, maybe a couple of hundred documented sightings in all of history,” Jason Holmberg, who came up with the idea to turn the Hubble’s Groth algorithm on the sharks, and who teamed up with Dr. Norman to create the database, told NASA.When the Stars and Sea CombineNow the library contains more than 76,000 sightings of 12,357 sharks, each one capable of growing up to 40 feet long and weighing 20 tons. These gentle, filter-feeding giants are somewhere between Endangered and Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List, and the database will go a long way towards ensuring that their feeding grounds and migration and breeding habitat can be found and preserved.last_img read more

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first_img Related Shows View Comments Summer’s over and it’s time to send the kids back to school! To celebrate this stressful time, Broadway.com asked Mr. and Mrs. Wormwood (Tony winner Gabriel Ebert and Olivier Award winner Lesli Margherita) of Broadway’s hit musical Matilda to offer up some helpful advice for parents. In our third of five videos below, the Mr. and Mrs. on helping your kids with their homework. To see more back-to-school tips with the Wormwoods, click here! Matilda Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 1, 2017last_img read more

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Melissa Benoist Takes On Music Icon Carole King in Beautiful on Broadway

first_img Former Glee star and current Supergirl lead Melissa Benoist made her first Great White Way appearance on June 7 portraying music titan Carole King in Beautiful: The Carole King Musical at the Stephen Sondheim Theatre. Benoist will play a limited Broadway-debut run in the hit show through August 4.Benoist first won the hearts of theater nerds as Marley Rose on Fox’s Glee. Her other screen credits include Arrow, The Flash, Legends of Tomorrow, Freedom Fighters: The Ray, Waco and her current gig in the title role of The CW’s Supergirl.To celebrate Benoist’s milestone debut, Broadway.com Resident Artist Justin “Squigs” Robertson sketched a portrait featuring Benoist’s thrilling turn as King alongside Evan Todd as Gerry Goffin, Jessica Keenan Wynn as Cynthia Weil, Ben Jacoby as Barry Mann, Nancy Opel as Genie Klein and Paul Anthony Stewart as Don Kirshner. View Comments About the Artist: With a desire to celebrate the magic of live theater and those who create it, and with a deep reverence for such touchstones as the work of Al Hirschfeld and the wall at Sardi’s, Squigs is happy and grateful to be among those carrying on the traditions where theater and caricature meet. He was born and raised in Oregon, lived in Los Angeles for quite a long time and now calls New York City his home.center_img © Justin “Squigs” Robertsonlast_img read more

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first_imgHarry Reid in “Witness for the Prosecution”(Photo: Ellie Kurttz) View Comments Harry Reid spent three and a half years making a name for himself in the popular British TV soap opera EastEnders and now the 25-year-old performer can be seen in the crucial role of Leonard Vole in Witness for the Prosecution, the time-honored Agatha Christie title that continues its hit run at London’s County Hall staged within a onetime debating chamber. The charming Reid met Broadway.com backstage late one afternoon to discuss a professional stage debut about which he could scarcely be more excited.Are you surprised to find yourself onstage and in this play?I feel very privileged to have this job and very humbled. I said to my agent that I wanted to do some theater but never imagined anything on this scale. Acting is my love and my passion and I’ve always wanted to explore all aspects of it, and now I can say I’ve done a TV soap and also a professional theater performance.Why was theater so attractive to you? One of the reasons, I think, was the discipline: I wanted to test myself doing eight shows a week, six days a week. When I was in the telly, that was very busy, but I was constantly getting new stuff and new material, so to keep this fresh through November is something that I felt I had to learn as an actor. You learn different performance skills, and I certainly feel a lot looser on stage.What do you make of Leonard, who finds himself arrested for the murder of a wealthy widow? I think he’s a great character and is someone I am growing with and am certainly growing to understand more, if you like. There’s a real sensitivity to him, which I love and that I think audiences may not expect.Have you come up with some sort of back story for him? As I see it, he’s gone and served in the army where he met [his wife] Romaine, who’s very strongminded so for him it was a breath of fresh air to find such a strong, independent woman. At the point we find him in the play, he has been accused of killing a 56-year-old woman while at the same time being completely in awe of his wife and also wanting on some level still to be the strongman.So is he at odds with himself? The thing about Leonard is that he has been through the mill: he has had a difficult childhood, served in the army and for his country and was rarely looked after – and that’s all before we meet him. He’s a complex character, and what actor doesn’t love parts that are complex?Do you think Leonard is guilty or not guilty? I can’t really even go there, but I would say he is not guilty. I mean, who knows, obviously, but, yeah, that’s what I would say.Did you watch the 1957 Billy Wilder film by way of preparation? I did, but it’s very different, as you know. I also watched a BBC TV adaptation. The TV version tends to skirt over certain bits and the ending is completely different, so what I have found is that it’s all in the text; as with most theater, the discovery is in the text.Given that we find Leonard on trial in the play, have you ever yourself had a brush with the law? [Laughs.] You know what, I’ve actually been a very good boy! Listen, we’ve all been young and have done stupid things: I was very much part of the “egging” phase [throwing eggs at property and the like] when I was about 10, so that was 15 or 16 years ago. But I’ve never been in the dock and I haven’t been in a cell—yet.Is it unusual for you in this instance to be younger than the character you are playing [Leonard is 27]? I guess it is, yes. My first job when I came out of drama school was playing a 16-year-old when I was 21, so looking young has tended to help me along the way. The thing with Leonard is that he’s older than I am, but has a boyish charm, so I’ve aged my face with make-up and was very particular about that; I wanted him to look a little bit haggard.Why do you think this production has been such a continued surprise success? There a few factors. First is that the set sells the show: I mean, if you put this production in a normal theater, it would be completely different and nowhere near as good, no matter who was on stage.You mean the fact that you feel as if you are in an actual courtroom? Yes: we’re in a debating chamber, which couldn’t get any more perfect. When I first got the job, I was talking to people about it and they said, “Yeah, I heard about that; it’s got a really cool set.” My friends back at home in Gravesend in Kent have no interest in the theater, but they pay a little bit of attention to it because I’m doing it and they knew about the buzz generated by the atmosphere itself.What about the story itself? I’ve noticed that there aren’t actually that many straight plays in London, and this is certainly one, so for someone like me who isn’t especially interested in musicals the choice is quite limited. Add to that the name value of someone like Agatha [Christie], and you know that you’ve got something guaranteed to get your mind ticking a bit—and that automatically makes the audience feel a bit more alive.This is a period piece but do you feel as if you might like to graduate next to something modern? I’ve got a mate who’s just been in a play called Pity at the Royal Court, and that’s a place I would love to work. But the thing with me is that I love acting and playing different parts to different audiences to different vibes: that’s what I live for.last_img read more

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T S Restaurants enter sixth year of XTERRA partnership in Maui

first_imgFor the sixth straight year T S Restaurants’ Hula Grill, Duke’s Beach House, Kimo’s and Leilani’s will serve as title sponsors of the XTERRA Kapalua Trail Runs in Maui.With four runs to choose from, a release from off-road specialist XTERRA notes that there is a distance and challenge for every member of the family… ‘Go big or start small with Kimo’s XTERRA Keiki K, Leilani’s XTERRA 2.5K Sprint & Beach Scramble, the Hula Grill XTERRA 5K or Duke’s Beach House XTERRA 10K trail runs.’Held in conjunction with the 21st running of the XTERRA World Championship triathlon, the Kapalua runs are an opportunity for outdoor enthusiasts of all ages and skill levels to get involved and experience the legendary XTERRA run course.The Kimo’s XTERRA Keiki Run is for boys and girls ages 10 and younger. It is free, although parents must be present to sign a waiver form at the site of the race. Race distances vary from 100 yards to 1K, depending on the age of the child. Parents are welcome to stay on the course as well.The new Leilani’s XTERRA 2.5K Sprint & Scramble is positioned as a test of agility, speed and strength as it goes from the Ritz to the Ravine to the soft sand of D.T. Fleming Beach. Kids 8-12 run for free, but it’s open to everyone.The Hula Grill XTERRA 5K is ‘an honest three-miles of climbing and descending and for those up to the challenge’. The Duke’s Beach House XTERRA 10K dishes out ‘big hills and dusty trails as it twists through oleander forests to an unexpected mountain lake at the 700-foot level then sends runners crashing down to the shoreline.’“They are all awesome races, and the vibe around The Ritz-Carlton rocks on Saturday morning,” said XTERRA President Janet Clark.In addition to the trail runs, a Paul Mitchell cut-a-thon will be held at the site of the race where runners and spectators alike are welcome to get their hair cut by professional Paul Mitchell stylists, with all donations benefitting the Challenged Athlete Foundation (CAF).More than 1,000 runners from around the world will take part in one of the four events, and to the winners go the spoils – as the first-place man and woman overall and the first-place male and female Maui resident (if different) in the 10K, 5K, and 2.5K win T S Restaurant gift certificates worth US$100.There is also an internal struggle going on, as employees from T S Restaurants created a race within a race dubbed ‘The T S Restaurants XTERRA Challenge’ in which each of the four restaurants field a team of 10 runners; and the team with the fastest cumulative time from their best five runners in the 5K take home the coveted TS Trophy.Last year Kimo’s captured the perpetual trophy for the second straight year and have it proudly displayed in their restaurant for all to see. Hula Grill won the titles in 2012 & 2013 and Duke’s Beach House captured the inaugural challenge in 2011.All four T S Restaurants also sponsor local teachers with complimentary entries into the run.“It’s all about celebrating the healthy, active, outdoors lifestyle with our employees and our community,” said Tammy Fukagawa, Executive Vice President for T S Restaurants.Hula Grill, Duke’s Beach House, Kimo’s and Leilani’s are four of Maui’s finest restaurants, and all are located within a short driving distance of Kapalua.“The unique feeling and setting of West Maui is exhibited at each of these four restaurants, and it is in keeping with what the XTERRA athletes and their families have come to expect when they get to the island of Maui,” XTERRA President Clark said. “Dining at any, or all, of these restaurants can only enhance the experience for our athletes, whether it be eating a pre-race meal or celebrating with a post-race meal.”Founded in 1977 by Rob Thibaut and Sandy Saxten, T S Restaurants owns and operates 13 restaurants in Hawaii and California, including Duke’s Waikiki and Hula Grill Waikiki on Oahu; Kimo’s, Leilani’s on the Beach, Hula Grill Kaanapali and Duke’s Beach House on Maui; Duke’s Kauai and Keoki’s Paradise on Kauai; and Jake’s Del Mar, Sunnyside Restaurant and Lodge, Duke’s La Jolla, Duke’s Huntington Beach and Duke’s Malibu in California.www.xterraplanet.com/maui/mauiTrailRunwww.tsrestaurants.com Relatedlast_img read more

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Spoilers ‘do not ruin stories’, study says

first_imgBBC:Knowing how a book ends does not ruin its story and can actually enhance enjoyment, a study suggests.Researchers at the University of California San Diego gave participants 12 short stories where two versions were spoiled and a third unspoiled.In all but one story, readers said they preferred versions which had spoiling paragraphs written into it.Although the study could not explain why, it suggested the brain may find it easier to process a spoiled story.“You get this significant reverse-spoiler effect,” study author and professor of social psychology Nicholas Christenfeld said.“It’s sort of as if knowing things puts you in a position that gives you certain advantages to understand the plot.”Co-author Jonathan Leavitt added: “It could be that once you know how it turns out, you’re more comfortable processing the information and can focus on a deeper understanding of the story.”Prof Christenfeld said this suggested people may enjoy a good story as much as a good twist at the end, and even if they know the outcome, will enjoy the journey as much as the destination.Read the whole story: BBC More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Colliers reports strong EMEA growth

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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