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Students volunteer with local universities, organizations to ‘Back the Bend’

first_imgBraving the cold and rain, students from the tri-campus community and other members of South Bend gathered Saturday to help with a variety of community service projects for the ninth annual “Back the Bend.”The event was a collaboration between the South Bend community, local universities and organizations — Notre Dame Student Government, Saint Mary’s College, Holy Cross College and Indiana University South Bend’s Student Government Association — and ten other local organizations.As the student government director of community engagement and outreach, senior Adam Moeller co-led the event with director of faith and service junior Keenan White. Moeller estimated that about 300 to 400 students attended the event. Photo courtesy of Sully O’Hara Students from Keough Hall participate in a “Mulch Madness” community service project Saturday as part of “Back the Bend,” a day-long event dedicated to volunteering around South Bend.“‘Back the Bend’ is, at its simplest level, a community service day, but it’s a lot more than that,” Moeller said. “We tried to focus it on getting students exposed and into the neighborhoods so that they’ll hopefully think about developing relationships with some of these groups. Obviously, these are all organizations who do wonderful things throughout the year and don’t rely on ‘Back the Bend,’ but it is a day when we can all come together and work on really important projects. I think it ends up being a learning moment for a lot of the volunteers, just seeing all the amazing things that community partners do.”For the event, students and community members worked together on seventeen different projects, including restoring Leeper Park, cleaning trash from a tributary of the St. Joseph River, and a project that Moeller organized, “Mulch Madness” — a project to mulch the soil around homes in the Near Northeast neighborhood to prevent lead exposure from degrading paint chips. Moeller said that this project, involving roughly 100 students distributing 24 truckloads of mulch around affected homes, demonstrates the often-extensive planning that goes into many of the “Back the Bend” projects.“It was one day of mulching about a hundred homes, but there was so much more behind that,” he said. “Since October, we were meeting frequently, discussing our plans for this. We spent the last eight weeks working with the workers at the [Near Northeast Neighborhood] to campus the neighborhood and talk to people about the lead issue and how the soil can have very elevated levels of lead.”Moeller said that, unlike past years, student government allowed and encouraged students to sign up as groups.“We had eight teams, and most of them were people who had signed up as part of a group, which was another strategy that we introduced this year,” he said. “We approached dorms, clubs, Tau Beta Pi [the engineering honors society] and many other groups. They were all able to work together, and I think that made it a fun group effort to be in a team with people you knew.”While the event itself is only a single day, Moeller believes that it can have a greater and longer-lasting impact on the participants and community.“In the immediate sense, the projects that happen are very important because it’s by far the best way these community partners can afford and make these projects happen,” Moeller said. “The greater importance of it is that people realize in the work they’re doing that it doesn’t have to be a one-day thing, that there are great people and great organizations doing things every day in the community, … that they should get more involved more and form relationships with these groups and people [and] that they should treat South Bend as their community, even [if] they are just here for two or three more years.”Tags: back the bend, Community Service, Mulch Madness, South Bend, volunteerlast_img read more

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Suspect dead after burglary of Hamshire home

first_imgOn Monday, August 17, 2015, at 2:37 am, the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office Dispatch Center received a call of a burglary of habitation that had just occurred in the 15000 block of San Jacinto Street, Hamshire, Texas. According to the homeowner, he was awakened by his dog barking. He retrieved his pistol and went into his kitchen, where he confronted a masked individual. Several shots were fired. Upon arrival deputies found the suspect lying in a yard down the street being held at gunpoint by neighbors. Upon arrival Hamshire VFD EMS pronounced the suspect deceased. The investigation is on-going at this time.last_img read more

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COVID-19 cases top 100 in Jefferson County, numbers climb locally

first_img If you are looking for information about COVID-19, call 211 option 6 or visit covid-19-jeffco.hub.arcgis.com.According to the Port Arthur Health Department, five Port Arthur residents are hospitalized, and so is one Nederland resident. Positive cases of COVID-19 have topped 100 in Jefferson County, health officials said.The Southeast Texas Regional Emergency Operations said Thursday’s compilation from different health departments indicated there are five coronavirus-related deaths in the county and 101 confirmed cases. Call volume, officials say, continues to go down considerably. Residents are encouraged to call 409-550-2536 to be evaluated for testing. The Call Center is open 24-hours, seven days a week.center_img Locally, there are 21 cases of COVID-19 confirmed for Port Arthur residents, six in Nederland, five in Groves and one in Port Neches.The Call Center reported 144 calls today.last_img read more

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NAHBS – Clockwork Bikes’ Slippery Stainless Silver Track Bike

first_imgClockwork hails from Minneapolis, and was sharing one giant booth with several other small builders, including Peacock Groove and Capricorn.  They build pretty much any kind of bike imaginable: road, track, urban, mountain bike, 29er, cyclocross, touring and full suspension, plus stems, forks and racks.  All from steel using either Columbus, Deda or True Temper tubing.OK.  I broke down and called Joel at Clockwork to learn more about the bike.   These nice smooth joints are sanded silver brazing.  The silver that’s used on the joints is yellowish because it’s only about 40% silver, the rest is alloys and the brazing (heating) process causes a little oxidation.The tubeset on this track bike is Columbus’ new Stainless Steel XCR tubeset.  The frame alone on this would $2,000 (which actually isn’t that bad considering what you’re getting…).  The response on this and his other bikes has boosted their orders…leadtime jumped from 4-ish months before the show to about 8 months at present.The road and commuter/utility bikes here show some of their other craftsmanship, like custom racks and sweet lugs. NAHBS 2010 – Clockwork’s booth suffered from a time crunch and OCD problem.  Admittedly, both of those problems were mine…I was trying to, nay obsessed with hitting every booth and, with no one immediately available to talk to here, I snapped some pics and moved on.  So, for more words, specs and details, hit up their website.  For more pics of this stainless steel track bike and some other pretty bicycles, jump past the break…last_img read more

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Odds & Ends: Ali Stroker to Sing Out in Two NYC Concerts & More

first_img View Comments Ali Stroker(Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser) Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today. Ali Stroker to Sing Out in Two NYC ConcertsAli Stroker, the Glee veteran who broke ground as the first-ever performer in a wheelchair in a Broadway show with her performance in Deaf West’s Spring Awakening, will offer two solo concerts at the Yotel’s Green Room 42 on September 17 and 18 at 8:00pm. The show, titled Burning Old Dresses!, will take the audience on an entertaining musical journey from Glee to Spring Awakening and beyond. The multi-talented Stroker will appear as a series regular on the previously announced ABC drama Ten Days in the Valley, which debuts on October 1.Nancy Anderson, Mara Davi & More to Lead Rachel Crothers’ A Man’s WorldBroadway veterans including Nancy Anderson, Mara Davi and Robert Cuccioli are set to perform Rachel Crothers’ 1910 drama A Man’s World for one night as part of the Project Shaw series. Jenn Thompson will direct the performance set to take place on September 18 at 7:00pm at Symphony Space’s Leonard Nimoy Thalia Theatre. Crothers’ provocative play about aspiring Greenwich Village artists broke ground when it was first produced. Joining Anderson, Davi and Cuccioli will be Arnie Burton, Finn Douglas, Ariel Estrada, Brandon Jones and Talene Monahan.Broadway’s Brenda Braxton & Todd Buonopane to Show Off Their Improv Skills in Villain DeBlanksA slew of stage veterans are part of the lineup for Billy Mitchell’s Villain: DeBlanks, playing weekly on Wednesdays at the Yotel’s Green Room 42. Presented by Tony nominee Brenda Braxton, the upcoming August and September editions will feature Braxton along with fellow Tony nominee Stephanie D’Abruzzo, Todd Buonopane, Molly Pope, Nikka Graff Lanzarone and Ryann Redmond. Described as “Clue meets adult Mad Libs,” Villain DeBlanks is performed by some of the funniest people in show biz. For the full schedule of performers and dates, click here. TedX Broadway Sets Return Date at New World StagesIndustry professionals from across the Rialto will come together for the 2018 edition of TedX Broadway, set for February 27 at off-Broadway’s New World Stages. TEDxBroadway comprises speakers from different perspectives and expertise from all theatricals fields. TEDxBroadway, now in its seventh year, has welcomed past speakers including Dear Evan Hansen Tony winners Benj Pasek and Justin Paul, SpongeBob SquarePants director Tina Landau and Broadway actor Alton Fitzgerald White. Speakers for the 2018 edition of TedX Broadway will be announced at a later date.Jason Gotay & More to Lead Prince of Egypt Musical Debut in CaliforniaBroadway vet Jason Gotay will lead the company of The Prince of Egypt, the new stage adaptation of the beloved animated film! The show will appear at California’s TheatreWorks Silicon Valley for a run from October 6 through November 5. The Prince of Egypt follows the saga of Moses and Ramses, his Pharaoh brother, and the indomitable people who changed them both forever. Featuring a book by Philip LaZebnik, a score by Stephen Schwartz, and directed by Scott Schwartz, The Prince of Egypt will feature Gotay as Ramses alongside Brennyn Lark as Tzipporah, Tom Nelis as Pharaoh Seti, Christina Sajous as Queen Tuya, Julia Motyka as Miriam, Will Mann as High Priest Hotep, David Crane as Aaron, Ayelet Firstenberg as Youcheved, Jamila Sabares-Klemm as Nefertari, Paul-Jordan Jansen as Jethro, with Natalie Schroeder and Alexandra Van De Poel rotating in the role of Young Miriam. The TheatreWorks run will be followed by a 2018 mouning in Denmark.Amanda Peet Among Playwrights Set for MCC Theater’s Playlabs Reading SeriesOur Very Own Carlin McCullough, a new work by Broadway and off-Broadway veteran Amanda Peet, will receive a one-night reading as part of MCC Theater’s Playlabs Reading Series. Tyne Rafaeli will direct the play, set to appear at the Lucille Lortel Theatre on September 11 at 7:00pm. The play centers on Carlin McCullough, a tennis prodigy with the chance for greatness. Additional playwrights set for the full Playlabs Reading Series include Jocelyn Bioh, Lily Houghton and Charise Castro Smith.P.S. The filmed version of Broadway’s Newsies will arrive on Netflix on September 5!last_img read more

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John Casella: The facts on the Coventry Landfill

first_imgCasella Waste Systems Inc,by John W Casella, Chairman and CEO, Casella Waste Systems As a lifelong Vermonter I have been a staunch advocate of the environment for my entire life. Over the last 45 years I have surrounded myself with the most forward thinking, hardest working, and intellectually capable people in the waste management industry and together we have worked every day to build a world class environmental services company.Today it is one of the largest resource management companies in the country. Our team spends their days focusing on helping our customers meet their sustainability goals through our substantial investments in recycling, organics, and environmentally sound management of municipal solid waste.Our company just finished a six-year process to expand our landfill in Coventry, Vt. This is the only landfill in the state that meets the solid waste needs of all Vermonters. This operation is critical to the health and safety of Vermonters and without it we would be putting ourselves and our natural environment at great risk.Americans are monumental consumers who have moved further down the path as a disposable society. As consumers we are constantly seeking new and better products, the latest and greatest gadgets, and the convenience of a modern lifestyle.As such, companies across the country and the globe race to produce products and provide conveniences that leave us in search of answers at the end of their collective lifecycles.We can pretend that landfills shouldn’t exist, but that’s emotion rather than clear-eyed fact. Emotions aside, the inescapable fact is that modern landfills—highly regulated, extensively engineered, relentlessly permitted—play an important role in how our society currently manages the waste it produces and are a crucial part of the infrastructure necessary to manage public and environmental health.We may not like them—we may even loathe them—but they make modern life possible, and safe. And, they are a bridge to the future as we make greater and faster progress towards conservation, renewal, and regeneration of resources.If you really stop and think about it, our company lives at the end of the life of products and materials. Society consumes products and then we either recycle, repurpose, or dispose of those items.With that in mind, I would argue that Vermonters need to do more at the beginning of the product lifecycle to combat the impacts of emerging contaminants to ensure that these new products are safe for our families and the environment. That is not the case today. There is intense scrutiny and regulation at the death of products, and much less so at the birth of products.During the latest permitting process at the Coventry landfill the process bogged down as regulators shifted from traditional environmental reviews to studying emerging contaminants, or “forever chemicals” as some like to call them, such as PFAS, which have gained national attention in recent years.While it’s tempting—and too easy—to point the finger at landfills, the truth is that for decades many of the products and day-to-day items used in our society contain these compounds and end up in our environment through many sources. Landfills do not manufacture PFAS compounds—it is a social and environmental challenge that has been flowing from our modern lifestyle. It is everyone’s responsibility to find ways to get PFAS out of water and other sources.We continue to do our part—and do it well—at the end of the waste stream using advanced technologies.The Act 250 Commission and the Agency of Natural Resources have reviewed volumes of data to determine the safety of wastewater treatment plants throughout Vermont.One of their most interesting findings?Wastewater treatment facilities that accept landfill leachate and those that do not, produce similar test results. In other words, whether or not a plant processes landfill leachate, they discharge PFOA and PFAS—it is that persistent of a compound.In fact, if the members of Memphremagog Conservation Inc. (MCI), and Don’t Undermine Memphremagog’s Purity (DUMP) are serious about addressing the purity of Lake Memphremagog, they have to be willing to confront the fact that wastewater being discharged into the lake from the Canadian side has the potential to be significantly more harmful.Canadian wastewater discharge standards for PFAS—and I use that term very loosely—are vastly less stringent than Vermont’s.In fact, Quebec has no standards as they have failed to adopt even Canadian national wastewater discharge standards. So, sadly, our Canadian friends at MCI (and their US allies at DUMP) may be the real threat to this important body of water.Their focus on the already stringent Vermont standards is taking time and resources away from addressing the real issues that are putting this natural resource at risk.A determination was made by ANR that treated effluent from the Newport Wastewater Treatment Plant would have no adverse impacts to human health or to the environment.Regardless, we will continue to work with our wastewater treatment plant partners as new treatment solutions emerge.We urge you to do your research and understand the science before believing the scare tactics of anti-landfill groups.Reach out to ANR and the Department of Health to get the facts about leachate and its treatment in Vermont.If you want to change as a society, everyone needs to look in the mirror. What are we consuming? What do we throw in our garbage can each day? Have you ever cooked an egg in a Teflon Pan?  Do you own a waterproof coat? Do you have stain proof carpets?  If you answered yes to these questions, you are part of the problem as all of these products used PFOA/PFAS.I respect my fellow Vermonters who are passionate about protecting the environment. I am as well.However, I challenge you to refocus your efforts on the true source of these emerging contaminants—the products that are coming into our state—and not on the infrastructure designed to protect us at the end of their lifecycle.Let’s refocus our passion and resources on making sure that we have safe and environmentally sound products entering our state, and that our neighbors in Canada do their part to protect the environment.last_img read more

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Griffin ready to lead the young lawyers

first_img July 15, 2013 Associate Editor Regular News Griffin ready to lead the young lawyers Griffin ready to lead the young lawyersMegan E. Davis Associate Editor Just after her swearing in as president of the Young Lawyers Division, Melanie Griffin spoke enthusiastically about the “world of opportunities” open to young lawyers.“During recent years, there are those who have tried to convince us otherwise, frequently focusing only on negative aspects of our profession,” she said.However, she said, “Attorneys have the rare skill set needed to embrace a lifelong challenge of learning, give a voice to those who do not have one, and effect the change that we wish to see in our local and global communities.”In addition to addressing challenges, Griffin discussed the work the division hopes to do to empower young lawyers to “recognize the special skills they possess to promote and advocate for justice.”To that end, she discussed several initiatives planned by the YLD for the coming year.The division’s technology committee plans to host a series of lunchtime seminars focused on incorporating today’s rapidly evolving technology into the legal practice.The committee is also launching a social media campaign with the goal of connecting with young lawyers.“Throughout the month of July, we will donate a dollar to The Florida Bar Foundation for every person who likes our Facebook page or begins following us on Twitter, ” Griffin said. “So if you love the YLD, like us on social media.”Griffin also highlighted several upcoming efforts of the YLD’s Law Student Division, including facilitating a robust mentoring program for law students.Additionally, the Law Student Division is planning several events to help educate law students. As an example, Griffin said the division is coordinating with the Center for Professionalism on work-life balance panels.“We also plan to expand our professionalism efforts through new professionalism grants and increased coordination with professionalism panels and committees,” she said.In the coming year, Griffin said the division’s Local Bar Affiliates Committee looks forward to providing additional grant opportunities to affiliate young lawyer divisions and sections throughout the state, while forging stronger bonds in order to support affiliates in their work.Finally, Griffin highlighted upcoming efforts by the division’s Transition to Practice Committee to expand its Mentoring with the Masters program.“This year, we will at least double the number of Mentoring with the Masters featured on our website to provide Florida’s young lawyers with the additional education they need to succeed in their practices,” she said.Marc D. Chapman, president of the law firm Dean Mead, where Griffin has served as an associate in the commercial litigation department for seven years, said she is “the most hardworking person I’ve ever met,” and the YLD is in capable hands as she becomes president.“I know Melanie is looking forward to her leadership role as president of The Florida Bar’s Young Lawyers Division,” he said.“This position is a continuation of her dedication to the community. Working with Melanie for several years, I have witnessed her handle situations with enthusiasm and a can-do attitude. She has the perfect demeanor and skills to lead the Young Lawyers Division.”last_img read more

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The Florida Bar receives clean audit

first_img T he Florida Bar receives clean audit The Florida Bar has received a clean audit for its 2014-15 fiscal operations. Audit Committee Chair Eric Meeks presented the findings of the Bar’s auditors at the Board of Governors’ recent Naples meeting. He said auditors found the Bar had good internal controls, and there were no inconsistencies or problems with the audit. The Bar’s net financial position at the June 30 end of the fiscal year was $61.3 million of which “$50.9 million is unrestricted and available for operations,” Meeks said. The board unanimously approved the audit report. The Florida Bar receives clean audit January 1, 2016 Regular Newslast_img read more

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Big Deals: Land/Sales, July-August 2015

first_imgIt’s the big deals, and the brokers who make them, that make the market an interesting one to watch.In every issue, AZRE publishes the top five notable sales and leases that have occurred one month out from publication based on research compiled by DTZ and Colliers International with CoStar.1. Paradise Ridge, Phoenix49.6 acres; $35MBuyer: Camden Property TrustSeller: Arizona State Land Department2. NWC 91st and Deer Valley Rd., Peoria78.93 acres; $17,276,000Buyer: Maracay HomesSeller: Communities Southwest3. Pyramid Peak Parkway, Peoria82.08 acres; $10.43MBuyer: Lennar Homes, Inc.Seller: Arizona State Land Department4. Golden Sands Farm, Gila Bend160 acres; $10,270,490Listing brokerage: Western Land Company5. Lots 1-190, The Meadows, Peoria53.22 acres; $9,307,956Buyer: Woodside HomesSeller: Communities SouthwestListing brokerage: Nathan & Associateslast_img read more

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One of science’s most baffling questions? Why we yawn

first_imgBBC:Mid-conversation with Robert Provine, I have a compelling urge, rising from deep inside my body. The more I try to quash it, the more it seems to spread, until it consumes my whole being. Eventually, it is all I can think about – but how can I stop myself from yawning?Provine tells me this often happens when people are talking to him; during presentations, he sometimes finds the majority of his audience with their mouths agape and tonsils swinging. Luckily, as a psychologist at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and author of Curious Behavior: Yawning, Laughing, Hiccupping, and Beyond, he isn’t offended. “It makes a very effective lecture,” he says. “You talk and then the audience starts yawning. And then you can ask people to experiment on their yawns – like closing the lips, or inhaling through clenched teeth, or trying to yawn with the nose pinched closed.”Read the whole story: BBC More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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