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ATB IN CONCERT Will Feature Live Band in North America

first_imgSat10/5Los Angeles, CAHollywood Palladium  Fr10/4San Francisco, CAWarfield Theatre  ATB IN CONCERT is more than just a simple DJ show. It’s a whole live concept implemented by a tour crew of 30 people combined with Insomniac’s unparalleled production. It’s ATB’s music presented by a live band, consisting of drummer, guitarist, bassist, keyboardists and a variety of singers, Jan Löchel (who sings ATB hits “What About Us,” “Believe In Me,” “Feel Alive” and “Move On”) Roberta Carter Harrison (singer on ATB hits “Hold You,” “You’re Not Alone,” “Let U Go,” “Long Way Home,” “I Don’t Wanna Stop” and “Swept Away”) and internationally renowned singer JES… and of course ATB.This exciting live concert show is where German producer ATB will share his hits as well as new tracks off his upcoming album CONTACT due out in early 2014.Trailer Video:Tour Dates: Fri10/11Chicago, ILAragon Ballroom Sat10/12New York, NYRoseland Ballroomlast_img read more

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Download now: Wallpaper for your favorite NASCAR Playoffs driver

first_imgJamie McMurray Kasey Kahne Kevin Harvick Austin DillonChase Elliott Martin Truex Jr.Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series PlayoffsAnd now, for mobile devices:Monster Energy NASCAR Cup SeriesMonster Energy NASCAR CupMonster Energy NASCAR Cup Series PlayoffsChris Graythen | Getty ImagesDale Earnhardt Jr. Ricky Stenhouse Jr. Denny Hamlin Kyle Larson Jimmie Johnson Brad Keselowski Ryan Newman Can’t get enough of your favorite NASCAR Playoffs driver? Want him near you at all times?We don’t blame you — and we’re here to help.Scroll or swipe below for wallpapers of all 16 Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series Playoffs drivers for your desktop or laptop (designed by NASCAR Creative Design). We also have three images designed to serve as the home screen or lock screen on your mobile device.Simply click on the image of the driver you want; the full-sized image will pop up, and you can download it and set it as your background.Bookmark this page and change them weekly if you want to. We hope you enjoy; see you Sunday at Chicagoland Speedway for the green flag (3 p.m. ET, NBCSN, MRN, SiriusXM NASCAR Radio).Ryan BlaneyKurt BuschKyle Busch Matt Kensethlast_img read more

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Cole Custer finishes seventh at Kansas Speedway

first_imgCole Custer finished seventh in the Super Start Batteries 400 Presented by O’Reilly Auto Parts at Kansas Speedway on Thursday.The top-10 finish for Custer added 30 points to his season total. Custer now ranks 19th in the NASCAR Cup Series standings with 352 points. A total of 16 drivers qualify for the the playoffs.Custer started in 24th position. The second-year driver has one career victory, with two top-five finishes and three results inside the top 10.The Ladera Ranch, California native began the race two spots behind his career mark of 22.2, but finished 16 places ahead of his career average of 23.1.Custer’s seventh-place finish came against a field of 40 drivers. The race endured 11 cautions and 47 caution laps. Prior to the checkered flag there were 21 lead changes.Denny Hamlin secured the victory in the race, and Brad Keselowski took second. Martin Truex Jr placed third, Kevin Harvick brought home fourth, and Erik Jones rounded out the top five.After Kyle Busch won Stage 1, Keselowski drove the No. 2 car to victory in Stage 2.Cole Custer Driver Page | Get Custer Gear | Race Centerlast_img read more

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Kinfolk Community To Honor Jeff Austin With Tribute At Northwest String Summit

first_imgNorthwest String Summit will pay tribute to late mandolin player Jeff Austin when the music festival returns to Horning’s Hideout in North Plains, OR this coming weekend. Austin died late last month at the young age of 45.Related: Brendan Bayliss Runs Through Grateful Dead, Phish, The Beatles, More At Jeff Austin Tribute ConcertThe festival shared the announcement on Monday with the following statement posted to its social media pages:“Please join us with the Kinfolk Community Remembrance & Unification Gathering as we remember our brother Jeff Austin and celebrate the Kinfolk Community that Yonder Mountain String Band along with their extended musical family has helped to create. So many of us met because of this band and community, including many of the bands we know and love!” Austin’s former Yonder Mountain String Band bandmate Ben Kaufmann shared a moving tribute to his late friend in the days following his shocking death. The tribute was just one of many shared by members of the folk, bluegrass, and jam scene following Austin’s death, including Widespread Panic, Umphrey’s McGee, The String Cheese Incident, Greensky Bluegrass, and more.This year’s Northwest String Summit will take place on July 18th-21st, and will feature performances from artists including Trampled By Turtles, The Infamous Stringdusters, Fruition, Galactic featuring Erica Falls, Pigeons Playing Ping Pong, Dark Star Orchestra, and more.Head to the event website for tickets and general info.last_img read more

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Library of Congress Puts Thousands of Historic Books Online

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreNearly 60,000 books prized by historians, writers and genealogists, many too old and fragile to be safely handled, have been digitally scanned as part of the first-ever mass book-digitization project of the U.S. Library of Congress (LOC), the world’s largest library. Anyone who wants to learn about the early history of the United States, or track the history of their own families, can read and download these books for free. “The Library chose books that people wanted, but that were too old and fragile to serve to readers. They won’t stand up to handling,” said Michael Handy, who co-managed the project, which is called Digitizing American Imprints. “Many of these books cover a period of Western settlement of the United States — 1865–1922 — and offer historians a trove of information that’s otherwise tough to locate,” he said. Books published before 1923 are in the public domain in the United States because their U.S. copyrights have expired. The oldest work in the batch, dated 1707, covers the trial of two Presbyterian ministers in New York. The 25,000th book to be digitized was a 1902 children’s history book, The Heroic Life of Abraham Lincoln: The Great Emancipator, in time for Lincoln’s bicentennial on February 12, 2009. These and the other digitized books can be accessed through the Library’s catalog Web site and the Internet Archive (IA), a nonprofit organization dedicated to building and maintaining a free online digital library. “The Library’s collections are of unbelievable scope and depth,” said Internet Archive co-founder Brewster Kahle. “Now, with an Internet connection, you can download, print or bind copies of all these books.” In addition to the LOC collection, IA includes content from other institutions that are part of the Open Content Alliance, a consortium of organizations around the world that seeks to build an archive of free, multilingual, digitized text and multimedia material. HISTORY AND GENEALOGY Many of the newly digitized LOC works contain hard-to-obtain Civil War regimental histories and county, state and regional information relating to specific people, their occupations and families, and other details that are important for historians and genealogists. Of an 1854 work by David Sutherland, titled Address delivered to the inhabitants of Bath, New Hampshire, one reader wrote, “I loved it. My two children are descendants of this gentle man. Very interesting first person accounts of early American life.” Books sit on a cart ready to be scanned for the Library of Congress mass book-digitization project. Nearly 60,000 books focusing on history and genealogy have been scanned, including many too fragile to be handled by readers. The scanned books, which are available on the Library of Congress and Internet Archive Web sites, are stored in a special facility in Maryland for safekeeping. Another reader commented on The Causes of the American Civil War by John Lothrop Motley, published in 1861 as the war began: “This is an amazing gift for humanity! We must be thankful with the people involved in this gigantic project, which is an open door to the treasures of our history. Thank you very much for doing this.” The Library of Congress has digitized many of its other collections — more than 7 million photographs, maps, audio and video recordings, newspapers, letters and diaries can be found at the Library’s Digital Collections site, such as the popular American Memory and the multilingual Global Gateways collections — but “this is the first sustained book-digitization project on a high-volume basis,” Handy said. The Internet Archive is the second-largest book-scanning project after Google Books. A subset of this project is the Google Books Library Project, which has agreements to scan collections of numerous research libraries worldwide. (Google Books remains the subject of legal challenges, particularly regarding copyright issues.) DIGITIZATION CHALLENGES A $2 million grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation inaugurated the LOC book digitization project. One of the grant’s objectives was “to address some of the issues that other book digitization projects had mainly avoided dealing with — for instance, the brittle book issue,” Handy said. “We established some procedures and preservation treatments to be able to scan books that otherwise couldn’t be scanned.” The library also worked with Internet Archive — which provided the scanning equipment — to develop a special station for scanning fold-out materials such as maps. Before and after scanning, a librarian inspects each book for damage — what Handy calls “preservation triage.” Ten scanning specialists sit at “Scribe” scanning stations. In each Scribe, two digital cameras hover over the open book on a mechanized tabletop. The specialist positions the book for accurate scanning, snaps the digital photos with a foot pedal, then turns the page and scans the next pages. The teams can scan 1,000 volumes per week. Hours after scanning and inspection, the books are available on the Internet. The Library of Congress is producing a report on best practices for dealing with brittle books and fold-out materials that it plans to post on its Web site and share with the Internet Archive and other members of the Open Content Alliance “so it’s available to anybody,” Handy added. The scanned books are retired to an environmentally controlled storage facility at Fort Meade, Maryland, “where they will not be served again, they will be preserved,” he said. Other federal agencies such as the Department of the Treasury and the Government Printing Office are sending books and documents through the Library of Congress scanning center (PDF, 90KB). It’s “an opportunity to demonstrate government transparency,” Kahle said. The Internet Archive tracks downloads. “It’s great to know that a Library book has now been used dozens or hundreds of times via the Internet Archive,” Handy said. “More funding will be sought to keep this going after this year. This is just the beginning.” (America.gov) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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Vermont Ag Hall of Fame expands, nominations open

first_imgVermont Business Magazine This year the Vermont Agricultural Hall of Fame celebrates its 16th year and will expand its nomination criteria to reflect the evolving face of Vermont agriculture. For the first time ever, nominations will be accepted in three categories: Emerging Leaders, Ag Innovators, and The Lifetime Achievement Award.“Agriculture is a critical part of Vermont’s community and economy,” according to Champlain Valley Expo V.P. and owner of Dakin Farm, Sam Cutting IV. “We are updating our nomination criteria to recognize the changing face of our agricultural economy. There is so much energy and innovation in this sector! We want to continue to honor those who’ve dedicated decades of services to Vermont agriculture, as well as recognize and encourage those poised to lead us in the future.”Nominations will be accepted in three new categories…Emerging Leader: This category highlights individuals who are stepping up to become the next generation of agricultural leaders in Vermont.  Age 40 or younger (born after June 1, 1978), these individuals demonstrate a deep commitment to Vermont’s working landscape and are poised to lead our Ag community into the future.  They are remarkable for their service, youthful energy, and dedication to Vermont agriculture.Ag Innovator: Individuals in this category have demonstrated a fresh and forward-thinking approach to agriculture.  They are making a significant, positive impact on Vermont, in areas such as growing the local economy, promoting stewardship and conservation, improving community health and nutrition, or developing new tools and practices, among others. They are notable for their unique perspective and unconventional approach. (Age is not a factor for consideration in this category.)Lifetime Achievement: This category recognizes individuals who have made a significant contribution to the advancement, improvement, or development of Vermont agriculture over the course of their long career. Nominees shall have played an active role in Vermont agricultural issues for at least thirty years.Nominations will be accepted until noon on June 22, 2018.“We are excited to have Alison Kosakowski Conant, of AK Conant Communications, working with us to expand this program,” said Tim Shea, Champlain Valley Expo’s Executive Director. “With deep roots in agriculture and communications, she is helping us preserve the traditions of the past, while also expanding to reflect the innovative nature of agriculture in Vermont, today.”To nominate a Vermonter for the 2018 Vermont Ag Hall of Fame electronically, visit  https://vtaghalloffame.wufoo.com/forms/zmg9ghn08x9azo/(link is external)To download a printable, paper copy of the nomination form, visit http://cvexpo.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Vermont-Agricultural-Hall-of-Fame-nomination-form-2.pdf(link is external)Since its founding in 2003, more than seventy Vermonters have been inducted into the Vermont Hall of Fame. Inductees are honored each year at a luncheon hosted during the Champlain Valley Fair. This year’s luncheon will be held Wednesday, Aug. 29th at noon. Vermont’s Ag Secretary, Anson Tebbetts, and Chuck Ross, Director of UVM Extension, will serve as emcees for the event.Source: Vermont AAFMlast_img read more

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VDH COVID-19 Update: 65 new cases, two deaths for 81 total

first_img235,165 2.8% 65(5,080 total) 11,204 People completed monitoring Travelers monitored Daily Update on Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)December 7, 2020New or updated information is in red and bold.This update is available online at healthvermont.gov/covid19(link is external)Click the “See the Latest Update” button.Please visit the Vermont Department of Health’s COVID-19 web and data pageshealthvermont.gov/covid19(link is external)What You Need to Know NowThe Health Department has a great deal of information and resources, including in multiple languages. As Vermont sees a surge in cases of COVID-19, know how you can help stop the spread:Wear a mask and keep a 6-foot distance from anyone outside your household.Do not get together or socialize with anyone you don’t live with (see more details here(link is external)). Avoid traveling when possible, even within Vermont. Anyone who travels to or from Vermont must quarantine(link is external). The only exception is for essential travel(link is external). If you’re sick, stay home. Even mild symptoms(link is external) (like a headache or dry cough) could be signs of COVID-19. Talk to your health care provider about getting tested, and stay home while waiting for your result. Learn more about who should get tested(link is external) and find a location near you.Take Care of Your Emotional and Mental HealthIf you or someone you know is in crisis or needs emotional support, help is available 24/7: Call your local mental health crisis line(link is external). Text VT to 741741 to talk with someone at the Crisis Text Line(link is external). Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline(link is external) at 1-800-273-8255.For more information visit healthvermont.gov/suicide(link is external).Visit our Coping With Stress(link is external) web page.Get connected to Alcohol and Drug Support Services at VT Helplink(link is external).Get self-help tips and connect to mental health services at COVID Support VT(link is external).Need to be connected to food resources?One in three Vermonters are at risk for food insecurity, struggling to find help feeding their families.If your financial situation has recently changed, you may now qualify for Vermont nutrition and food programs. They include: WIC program (Women, Infants and Children), 3SquaresVT/SNAP, and more. Newer programs such as Farmers to Families and Everyone Eats are helping to fill the gaps. All these programs can help keep healthy food on the table.Contact the Health Department(link is external), Hunger Free Vermont(link is external), or call 2-1-1 for more information.New at healthvermont.gov(link is external)Outbreaks at five social gatherings/events have led to 13 secondary outbreaks. Secondary outbreaks are when multiple cases occur in a new setting as a result of spread from the primary outbreak. Learn more in the latest Weekly Data Summary(link is external).The new map(link is external) of town-level COVID-19 activity shows the rate of cases of COVID-19 among Vermont residents per 10,000 people, by town of residence during the past two weeks. This change offers a more current view of what’s happening, on a rolling basis. The map also includes a table that shows cumulative town counts since March. The map and the table are updated weekly.Case InformationCurrent COVID-19 Activity in VermontAs of 12 p.m. on December 7, 2020 Description Contacts monitored Hospitalized under investigation 2,996 Hospitalized in ICU Currently hospitalized 81 5 6 * Includes testing conducted at the Health Department Laboratory, commercial labs and other public health labs.+ Death occurring in persons known to have COVID-19. Death certificate may be pending. Hospitalization data is provided by the Vermont Healthcare Emergency Preparedness Coalition and is based on hospitals updating this information.Find more data at: healthvermont.gov/currentactivity(link is external).Guidance for Vermonters and BusinessesHealth information, guidance and data: healthvermont.gov/covid19(link is external)Sector guidance: accd.vermont.gov/covid-19(link is external)Modeling: dfr.vermont.gov/about-us/covid-19/modeling(link is external)Governor’s actions: governor.vermont.gov/covid19response(link is external)Get the information you need at our Frequently Asked Questions(link is external).School & Child Care GuidanceStrong and Healthy Start: Safety and Health Guidance for Vermont Schools(link is external)Mental Health: A Strong and Healthy Start: Social, Emotional and Mental Health Supports During COVID-19(link is external)Child care: Health Guidance for Child Care and Out of School Care(link is external)More resources on the Your Community web page(link is external). People tested 586,309 Deaths+ New cases* 26 Percent Positive (7-day average) Total tests Number 209 Total people recovered 184last_img read more

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Congress adjourns without addressing IRA legislation

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Dennis Zuehlke Dennis is Compliance Manager for Ascensus. Mr. Zuehlke provides clients with technical support on tax-advantaged accounts (including individual retirement accounts, health savings accounts, simplified employee pension plans, and Coverdell education … Web: www.ascensus.com Details After passing a two-year budget deal in late December to avoid another government shutdown, the House and Senate adjourned for the year without acting to extend the legislation that permits qualified charitable distributions (QCDs) from IRAs. As a result, QCDs sunset on December 31, 2013, and are no longer permitted under current tax laws. IRA owners must now wait and see whether Congress will extend the legislation retroactively as they have in the past.Fresh off his victory in the 2012 presidential election, President Obama early in his second term proposed significant IRA changes—including a cap of $3 million on IRAs and employer plans—in order to raise $9 billion of additional revenue over the next 10 years. The President also proposeda five-year time period for inherited IRA distributions,greater electronic filing of information returns,reduced tax incentives for higher-income taxpayers,elimination of required minimum distributions (RMDs) for certain individuals,indirect nonspouse beneficiary rollovers to inherited IRAs,a tax credit for small employer plan start-up costs that was double the amount previously proposed, and,an automatic IRA option for individuals not covered by employer plans.As with any Administration proposals, there were no guarantees that they would become law, as they represent the Administration’s wish list. The Administration instead looked to the President’s key supporters in the House and Senate to introduce the proposals as legislation that would move through the Congress and become law.Shortly after the Obama Administration released its retirement savings proposals, Rep. Richard Neal (D-MA) reintroduced the Retirement Plan Simplification and Enhancement Act of 2013. Rep. Neal’s bill included a number of the Obama Administration proposals, including indirect nonspouse beneficiary rollovers to inherited IRAs, elimination of RMDs for those over age 70½ whose aggregate IRA and employer plan balances are less than $100,000, and an enhanced small employer plan start-up credit.Rep. Neal also introduced the Automatic IRA Act of 2013 that included provisions to require employers in business for at least two years that have 10 or more employees to offer an automatic IRA option. Under Rep. Neal’s proposal, regular contributions would be made to an IRA on a payroll deduction basis. The employer’s role would be to facilitate employee contributions using its existing payroll deduction system, but no employer contributions would be required.Employers offering automatic IRAs would provide employees with a standard notice and election form informing them of the option and allowing them to elect to participate or opt out. Employees who do not provide a written participation election would be automatically enrolled and have three percent of their compensation deposited to the IRA.Employees could choose to opt out of participation, or opt for a lower or higher contribution rate than the three percent default. Employees could also choose a Traditional or Roth IRA, with the Roth IRA being the default.The employer would be allowed to designate a single IRA trustee or custodian for all employees, or if preferred, could allow each employee to select the IRA trustee or custodian for that employee’s contributions.To help defray costs, small employers with no more than 100 employees could claim a temporary, nonrefundable tax credit for the employer’s expenses associated with making automatic IRAs available to employees.No action was taken on either of Rep. Neal’s bills after they were introduced and referred to Committee.The President’s proposal to restrict the time period over which nonspouse beneficiaries could receive inherited IRA distributions was introduced in two separate student loan bills to offset the tax cost of maintaining reduced interest rates for certain federal student loans. The provision, which would have required most nonspouse beneficiaries of IRAs and employer plans to deplete the accounts within five years, would have accelerated the taxation of the accounts compared to being distributed and taxed over the beneficiary’s lifetime. The Senate twice voted on bills containing the five-year time period for nonspouse beneficiary payouts, but the measure failed both times. Legislation was later passed to maintain lower student loan interest rates, but without the nonspouse beneficiary payout limitation.In the end, Congress saw much of its first term consumed by hearings on the IRS scandal and Benghazi terrorist attack, Edward Snowden’s allegations of NSA surveillance, and budget disputes that ultimately led to the October government shutdown. The only IRA legislation that was passed in first session of the 113th Congress was a bill that retitles the section of the Internal Revenue Code that permits spousal contributions. The action was taken by the House and Senate to honor recently retired Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-TX) and renames section 219(c) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 as the Kay Bailey Hutchison Spousal IRA.The second session of the 113th Congress has now convened, but it remains to be seen whether any action will be taken on IRA legislation. First on the agenda will be work on the massive spending bills that will implement the recently passed two-year budget deal and allocate funds among thousands of federal government programs, from agriculture to transportation and the military. In a deeply divided Congress facing mid-term elections in the fall, there are likely to be many disagreements as to how funds are allocated among the programs. With the government operating under a stopgap continuing resolution due to expire on January 15, and Congress set to leave for its mid-January recess shortly thereafter, there is little time to reach agreement. The manner in which agreement is reached—or not reached—could well set the tone for the remainder of the 113th Congress and determine the fate of any IRA legislation.last_img read more

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First and fourth place for split squad

first_img“I can’t really gauge anything until I get into the tougher competition and see how I handle things,” Brown said. “Because it’s a lot different racing when you know that you’re probably going to win versus racing when you know you’re going against people that race really tough.”Of course, on Saturday, Brown was just the pace-setter for a group of Minnesota runners that performed well.Junior Ladia Albertson-Junkans took second (17:18.50); freshman Elizabeth Yetzer finished third (17:27.10); redshirt freshman Jamie Cheever was fourth (17:27.70); and redshirt freshman Heather Dorniden rounded out the Gophers’ top 10 finishers by taking eighth (17:59.05).While the competition Saturday was not nearly as top-notch as that at the Griak, the Gophers’ performance in South Dakota could be a sign that the team is quickly putting last weekend’s disappointment behind them.“We kind of had a rough day out there at the Griak,” sophomore Gabriele Anderson said. “I think this meet was really good for our confidence.”Fourth place on FridayThe other half of the team competed Friday in the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire Invitational.The group, composed of the Gophers’ more under-the-radar runners, took home a fourth place finish, earning 110 points. University of Wisconsin-La Crosse won the meet with 40 points.“I thought the Eau Claire kids ran so much better than they did at the Griak,” Wilson said.Sophomore Kristin Johansen was Minnesota’s top finisher, taking home fourth place (23:00).According to Wilson, however, the story of the day was the performance of redshirt freshman Clarissa Bootsma, whose 21st place finish (23:58) was second-best for the Gophers. Wilson said Bootsma was actually a swimmer in high school.“I think this is about her fourth cross country meet,” Wilson said. “It’s very interesting to see what she’s been able to accomplish. She’s going to be excellent.” First and fourth place for split squadSenior Emily Brown won her second race of the year at the SDSU meet. Chris LempesisOctober 2, 2006Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintMinnesota’s women’s cross country team’s fourth-placefinish at last weekend’s Roy Griak Invitational was adisappointment for coach Gary Wilson.Wilson said he thought his runners were perhaps a bit distracted by family and friends in attendance for the home meet and didn’t run as well as they could have.The Gophers split their team for a pair of road meets this weekend, with things going considerably better – especially Saturday.Claiming the top four spots, and five of the top 10, Minnesota dominated the South Dakota State Invitational 5K in Brookings, S.D., Saturday. The 19th-ranked Gophers won the meet, which mostly consisted of lower-level teams, with a total of 18 points – very close to a perfect score of 15 points.“Last week, I thought we ran like a top-20 team at the Griak,” Wilson said. “This week I thought we ran like a top-10 team.”Leading the way for Minnesota was the same runnerwho has been leading the way all season, senior Emily Brown.Brown, the Gophers’ No. 1 runner, won the meet with a time of 17:08.70.“Going into the race we were pretty sure that somebody from Minnesota was going to win it,” Brown said, referring to the lower-level competition. “It was just a matter of who it was going to be.”The win is Brown’s second of the year, as she also won the Oz Memorial Run on Sept. 9.Those two wins, coupled with her third place finish at the Griak, show that Brown could very well be running deep into November, the month of both the NCAA Midwest Regionals and the NCAA Championships.last_img read more

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Thinking Clearly About Personality Disorders

first_imgThe New York Times: For years they have lived as orphans and outliers, a colony of misfit characters on their own island: the bizarre one and the needy one, the untrusting and the crooked, the grandiose and the cowardly.Their customs and rituals are as captivating as any tribe’s, and at least as mystifying. Every mental anthropologist who has visited their world seems to walk away with a different story, a new model to explain those strange behaviors.This weekend the Board of Trustees of the American Psychiatric Association will vote on whether to adopt a new diagnostic system for some of the most serious, and striking, syndromes in medicine: personality disorders.Personality disorders occupy a troublesome niche in psychiatry. The 10 recognized syndromes are fairly well represented on the self-help shelves of bookstores and include such well-known types as narcissistic personality disorder, avoidant personality disorder, as well as dependent and histrionic personalities.Read the whole story: The New York Times More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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