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Avengers come to the aid of Disney

first_img Avengers come to the aid of Disney Tags: NULL Read This NextRicky Schroder Calls Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl ‘Ignorant Punk’ forThe Wrap’Drake & Josh’ Star Drake Bell Arrested in Ohio on Attempted ChildThe WrapDid Donald Trump Wear His Pants Backwards? Kriss Kross Memes Have AlreadyThe WrapCNN’s Brian Stelter Draws Criticism for Asking Jen Psaki: ‘What Does theThe WrapHarvey Weinstein to Be Extradited to California to Face Sexual AssaultThe WrapThe Truth About Bottled Water – Get the Facts on Drinking Bottled WaterGayot’Black Widow’ First Reactions: ‘This Is Like the MCU’s Bond Movie’The WrapWatch President Biden Do Battle With a Cicada: ‘It Got Me’ (Video)The WrapPink Floyd’s Roger Waters Denies Zuckerberg’s Request to Use Song in Ad:The Wrap whatsapp Show Comments ▼ Walt Disney’s revenue missed Wall Street expectations for the first time in eight quarters, mainly due to lower attend­ance and occupied room nights at its Paris and Hong Kong resorts. However, its studio business record­ed a profit of $472m, (£303m) up from $411m a year earlier, aid­ed by the suc­cess of Aven­gers: Age of Ultron. center_img Share by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailSwift VerdictChrissy Metz, 39, Shows Off Massive Weight Loss In Fierce New PhotoSwift VerdictMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity WeekPost FunKate & Meghan Are Very Different Mothers, These Photos Prove ItPost FunComedyAbandoned Submarines Floating Around the WorldComedyForbesThese 10 Colleges Have Produced The Most Billionaire AlumniForbesGameday NewsNBA Wife Turns Heads Wherever She GoesGameday Newszenherald.comMeghan Markle Changed This Major Detail On Archies Birth Certificatezenherald.comEquity MirrorThey Drained Niagara Falls — They Weren’t Prepared For This Sickening DiscoveryEquity Mirror Wednesday 5 August 2015 5:34 am whatsapp Express KCS last_img read more

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Thirsty? Your brain knows before you do

first_img Can detox waters really flush your fat and toxins away? By Leah Samuel Aug. 3, 2016 Reprints It’s August. It’s hot. You reach for water.Thirst is our signal that our bodies’ equilibrium is off. We get a signal, we drink, we’re happy. Yet, our brains tell us to start and stop drinking long before water reaches our blood to restore our equilibrium. What gives?Research published Wednesday in Nature points to a group of neurons deep in our brains that responds to signals from our mouths and our blood, prompting us to drink and getting us to stop. These neurons, the research team said, anticipate the need for water, long before we physiologically need it.advertisement Related: “The conventional view is that the body signals its needs as they come up,” said researcher Zachary Knight, an assistant professor of physiology at the University of California, San Francisco, and lead researcher of the study. “But the emerging view is that the system is more anticipatory than reactionary.” Researchers have found that thirst is modulated by neurons deep in our brains that predict when we’ll need water. Marion Berard/AFP/GettyImages 4 tricks to beat the heat — and whether science says they actually work Knight and his team focused on the subfornical organ, part of a region of the brain that maintains fluid balance in our bodies. Stimulating neurons within the SFO of mice caused them to drink water, even when they shouldn’t have been thirsty. Giving them salt seemed to stimulate the neurons.advertisement Related: In the LabThirsty? Your brain knows before you do And the researchers also saw that eating, when we drink the most water, triggered the neurons to fire.The next step would be to repeat these experiments in people, said Lawrence Armstrong, a professor and director of the Human Performance Laboratory at the University of Connecticut.“There is information here that may be applicable to humans,” said Armstrong, who was not involved with the study. “But it’s not analogous.”He added, however, that the study is useful in a number of respects.“The idea of homeostatic and regulatory control of drinking has been around since the 1960s,” he said. “But this is taking us many steps forward in understanding how the brain predicts changes in fluid balance, with the goal of reducing overconsumption or underconsumption.” Then they gave mice water after restricting them overnight. The team saw that SFO neurons started firing, but started declining the second the mice started lapping up water. The mice stopped drinking when the neurons hit their baseline level of activity and blocking the neurons from working kept the mice from drinking, even when they physiologically needed to.“Until recently, it wasn’t clear which neurons were the ‘thirst neurons,’” he said. “But now that we can image these neurons in a living animal, we’re able to learn more.”But what about the feeling of quenched thirst?That, he said, is partly explained by the effect of simply having a cool sensation in your mouth.“Cool water causes the thirst neurons to go down. Your blood doesn’t care if the water is cool or not, but we prefer cold water,” he said.This is why patients who can’t have food or drink before a procedure get ice chips — the coolness helps them feel less thirsty, he said. Tags biomedical researchneurosciencethirstlast_img read more

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first_img Log In | Learn More By Sheila Kaplan April 12, 2017 Reprints Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. On the new FDA chief’s agenda: A bipartisan bill to regulate diagnostic lab tests Unlock this article — plus daily intelligence on Capitol Hill and the life sciences industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED What’s included? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. What is it? WASHINGTON — One of the first big issues Scott Gottlieb will have to weigh in on if confirmed as Food and Drug commissioner is what to do about the booming field of diagnostic tests.Gottlieb, a physician and libertarian scholar, has been lukewarm on whether to regulate in vitro clinical tests, a category that includes finished products such as test kits and platforms as well as laboratory developed tests (LDTs), which are lab protocols used for diagnostics. GET STARTED Politics Alex Hogan/STAT Tags diagnostisgeneticspolicySTAT+last_img read more

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first_img Please enter a valid email address. Privacy Policy About the Author Reprints After three months of using hot compresses to shrink the stye on my daughter’s eyelid, it wasn’t getting any smaller. My daughter is prone to this sort of growth, called a chalazion. This one would have to be removed surgically, like the one she had removed from the same eyelid two years earlier.But there was one key difference this time around: Like tens of millions of people who get health insurance through their employer, my family was now in a high-deductible health plan. That meant we would have to pay for the entire cost of the surgery out of pocket. Suddenly, the cost of the surgery became very important to our family.Encouraging patients to price shop for their health care is one reason employers are switching to high-deductible plans. The theory is that patients will compare prices across different doctors or hospitals and choose the lower-priced one, thereby saving themselves (and their employer) money. But in order to shop, you need to be able to see what something costs beforehand. Transparency in health care prices is a goal of President Trump’s health agenda, and is a priority for other politicians as well.advertisement Ateev Mehrotra Sadly, my family’s price-shopping experience is the norm in the U.S. My colleagues and I have found that most people can’t successfully shop for care, and that offering people a price transparency website doesn’t help them switch to lower-cost providers and doesn’t decrease health care spending.Why isn’t price transparency currently working? It’s not that Americans don’t agree with the idea of shopping for health care. Most believe it makes sense and could save money for families and the health care system. Many recognize that there’s a great deal of price variation and believe that health care prices have little relation to quality, a suspicion our research backs up.What can be done? First, we need to bundle payments to hospitals and surgery centers: a single payment that covers everything related to a procedure or doctor visit. Patients shouldn’t have to navigate the craziness of different bills for the hospital, surgeon, operating room, pathologist, anesthesiologist, and the like.Second, we need a real-time “checkout” model consistent with most other services (think of auto repair). Health care providers would be required to give an estimated cost for a procedure as soon as it is recommended — we should have walked out of the ophthalmologist’s office after the initial visit knowing exactly what we would have to pay for the chalazion removal. There are still many logistical barriers to such a system, but it is technologically feasible and essential to let people truly compare prices.Third, we need to make it easier to access the price data. Our family’s frustrations with accessing the website, which was both hard to find and hard to navigate, is common. Efforts by states such as New Hampshire and Colorado to make cost data easily accessible should be spread across the country. How did it go? Terribly. Here’s why:advertisement Molly Riley/AP If prices are kept hidden, consumers can’t take more responsibility for their health care costs My family had every advantage that newly minted price shoppers could possibly have: We live in Massachusetts, one of the states that have passed price transparency laws to help patients shop for care; I am a physician; my research focuses on consumerism and price transparency, giving me plenty of insider information; and the surgery was minor and not urgent, giving us lots of time to shop around. I’ve put my family on a health insurance experiment. It’s been a challenge @ateevm Related: Related: By Ateev Mehrotra Sept. 14, 2017 Reprints [email protected] Newsletters Sign up for First Opinion A weekly digest of our opinion column, with insight from industry experts. Leave this field empty if you’re human: Fourth, we need to think differently about how people shop for health care. Right now, the idea is that people must shop for every piece of care they need, from a lab test to an MRI or a visit to a dermatologist. But that isn’t the way the health care system works. When someone’s primary care doctor recommends a particular MRI facility or specialist, patients are reluctant to choose someone else, often out of fear that the medical professional knows best.A better approach would be to help people profile different primary care doctors based on the prices of the specialists, radiology tests, and other things they order. This would let people choose their primary care doctor and then not worry about overriding their doctors’ recommendations on related services.The tremendous price variation in health care shows us that Americans could save a lot of money if we could shop for lower-priced care. But first we need to make it much easier to do that.Ateev Mehrotra, M.D., is an associate professor of health care policy and medicine at Harvard Medical School and a hospitalist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. He has received grants from the Arnold Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, CalPERS, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation for research related to price shopping and consumerism. First OpinionI’m the perfect person to price shop for an operation. But the process went terribly On the website for our health plan, we muddled our way to its hard-to-find price transparency page. When we finally got there, we didn’t get the information we needed: removing a chalazion is not a common procedure, so it wasn’t listed.An ophthalmologist would remove the growth. The billing department for the ophthalmologist who evaluated my daughter could tell us only what the doctor’s fee for the surgery would be ($1,007) and didn’t know the fees for the anesthesiologist or the operating room, both of which could be as much as, or more than, the doctor’s fee.To get a better price estimate, we called our health plan. It asked us to submit a written cost request for the surgeon and the hospital we were considering. Twenty-four days later, we received an estimate of $452, which was both incomplete (it only showed the ophthalmologist’s fee) and incorrect (the health plan mistakenly assumed we were in a different insurance plan).Other ophthalmologists we called said they would give us a price quote for the surgery only if we brought our daughter in to be evaluated. Each evaluation visit would cost more than $200.One month into our price-shopping effort, all we knew was that the ophthalmologist’s fee would be in the $452 to $1,007 range, and the total surgery would cost much more. All the while, the red, swollen eyelid on our increasingly miserable middle-schooler was waiting to be treated. So, we decided to go ahead and have the original ophthalmologist do the surgery, even though we had no idea what it would really cost.In the end, it cost us $1,443, including $556 for the ophthalmologist and $887 for the anesthesiologist and hospital. Despite the challenges, we recognize that we were fortunate — our daughter’s surgery went well and we could afford this unbudgeted expense. Others aren’t so fortunate. Tags insurancepatientslast_img read more

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California plans to sell its own generic drugs in hopes of lowering costs

first_img Robert Keenan/AP Log In | Learn More Pharmalot By Ed Silverman Jan. 9, 2020 Reprints Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED What’s included? What is it? GET STARTED Ed Silvermancenter_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. About the Author Reprints California plans to sell its own generic drugs in hopes of lowering costs In an unexpected move, California plans to become the first state in the nation to sell its own generic drugs under a proposal that Gov. Gavin Newsom hopes will lower rising health care costs.The measure would involve contracting with one or more generic manufacturers and selling the medicines under the state’s own label. The goal is to increase competition that builds on state efforts begun last year to use government purchasing power to make medicines more affordable for state residents. STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. [email protected] @Pharmalot Tags Congressdrug pricingGenericsSTAT+stateslast_img read more

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Wrong-way driver arrested for DUI on Alligator Alley

first_imgRELATEDTOPICS Small plane makes emergency landing on Alligator Alley June 14, 2021 AdvertisementThe legal limit in Florida is .08. AdvertisementTags: Alligator AlleyDUIwrong way AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 commentsDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments COLLIER COUNTY, Fla. – A woman was arrested for driving in the wrong direction on Alligator Alley while drunk early Tuesday morning. Troopers pulled over the woman, identified as 38-year-old Sarah Nina Osceola, at 12:45 a.m. Osceola was driving eastbound in the westbound lanes near mile marker 72. Troopers said Osceola was impaired and arrested for driving under the influence. Osceola was booked into the Collier County Jail with a blood alcohol concentration level of .122. Child dies after drunk Texas man causes three-car crash in Lehigh Acres June 11, 2021 North Port woman sentenced to 13 years for deadly crash after spring training game June 14, 2021 Empty beer bottles found near crashed car in Collier, driver arrested June 7, 2021last_img read more

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Two Florida men, 1 woman charged in $1.5M ‘grandparent fraud’ scheme

first_img Florida nursing homes report COVID-19 infection rates nearly double the national average June 16, 2021 AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments AdvertisementUlysse surrendered to authorities on Friday. Avboraye-Igbinedion and English were arrested on Wednesday.Two other people already have pleaded guilty to related charges that they defrauded more than 28 elderly victims of more than $939,000. David Green, 25, of Miami Gardens, Florida; and McArnold Charlemagne, 33, of Miramar, Florida; are scheduled to be sentenced on Oct. 29.The people who participated in the scheme allegedly posed as police officers or lawyers when they called elderly people across the U.S. and told them that a relative needed cash to get out of jail or pay for legal fees. “Once the victims did send money, the conspirators called the victims asking for more cash, regularly obtaining tens of thousands of dollars from the retirement savings of victims,” Lenzner’s office said in a news release. AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments Over 1,000 unemployment claim call takers let go as DEO cancels contract June 12, 2021 Florida moves against foreign theft of intellectual property June 8, 2021 Two suffer shark bites off Florida beach June 16, 2021 RELATEDTOPICS Advertisement Advertisement BALTIMORE, Md. (AP)— Two Florida men and a Baltimore woman have been indicted on charges they engaged in a scheme to defraud at least 70 elderly people out of more than $1.5 million.Federal prosecutors in Maryland said the three defendants duped their victims into believing that a grandchild or other relative needed money for bail, legal fees or other expenses.An indictment unsealed on Friday charged Medard Ulysse, 37, of Miami; Eghosasere Avboraye-Igbinedion, 26, of Miramar, Florida; and Amaya English, 21, of Baltimore; with conspiracy to commit mail fraud.“By preying on the grandparents’ love for their family and then stealing their retirement savings, these defendants allegedly victimized them twice,” acting U.S. Attorney Jonathan Lenzner said in a statement. AdvertisementTags: Elderly scamFloridalast_img read more

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Emergency staff to be pampered for free around Laois this week

first_img Previous articleTwo high-profile speakers for international women’s day event in LaoisNext articleOrange status weather warning as some minor roads remain blocked David PowerA journalist for over 20 years, David has worked for a number of regional titles both as journalist and editor. From Tullamore he also works as a content editor for Independent.ie. His heroes include Shane Lowry, Seamus Darby and Johnny Flaherty WhatsApp Twitter “We owe so many lives to you and so many ‘thank yous’,” they add.They have asked people to message them to  book an appointment for this Tuesday and bring your ID to let them say “thank you: to you”.The offer comes from ‘Lana and all the girls in Inache’.Lana from Inache said: “I’d also like to add that Frankie Horan from Mountmellick is also helping us and taking all those who we can’t accommodate.“He deserves a massive thank you. Not only that, he is also donating all the brushes to use during the day.”Pay backThe ‘Hair House’ in Rathdowney is also looking to “pay back” all those who worked on behalf of the local community.They have offered a free blowdry of gents cut for members of the the civil defence, fire brigade, doctors and nurses, ambulance paramedics, guards and army.It certainly has been a busy week for those working during the snow.By the weekend, Laois Civil Defence had responded to 147 calls. These calls were a mixture of support to HSE staff and patients as well as community and logistical support to Laois County Council and gardaí.Hospital staff in Portlaoise also made many sacrifices to make sure they got into work last week, with many staying in the nearby Killeshin Hotel.SEE ALSO – WATCH: Incredible drone footage of Stradbally, Portarlington and Portlaoise Emergency staff to be pampered for free around Laois this week Pinterest The Herculean efforts by emergency staff who worked to ensure the safety of the public will be rewarded by local businesses who are offering free blow drys and treatments.The sacrifices made by many public employees has been acknowledged by local business who would now like to pay them back for their efforts to ensure public safety over the past week during Storm Emma and heavy snow during the ‘Beast from the East’.Inache salon in Portlaoise is one such business and has offered a reward through free blowdry Tuesday!On their social media page, they ask people to tag nurses, doctors, HSE members, fire brigade members, paramedics, members of an Garda Siochana, army and civil defence.“We spotted this on another page and thought what a beautiful and kind idea! We’d like to offer you all a free blowdry on Tuesday to thank you for your hard work this week, during Storm Emma and The Beast from The East,” their social media post says. Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter TAGSBeast from the eastemergency staffLaois By David Power – 5th March 2018 center_img Council Home News Community Emergency staff to be pampered for free around Laois this week NewsCommunity WhatsApp Facebook Pinterest Laois County Council team up with top chef for online demonstration on tips for reducing food waste Community Rugby Laois County Council create ‘bigger and better’ disability parking spaces to replace ones occupied for outdoor dining Ten Laois based players named on Leinster rugby U-18 girls squadlast_img read more

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CFTC wins trial against virtual currency fraudster

first_imgJames Langton Facebook LinkedIn Twitter A New York federal court has ordered more US$1.1 million in penalties and restitution against the operator of a virtual currency scheme, the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) announced Friday.The court found that CabbageTech Corp., which operates as Coin Drop Markets (CDM), and Patrick McDonnell, the firm’s founder “engaged in a deceptive and fraudulent virtual currency scheme to induce customers to send money and virtual currencies to CDM, purportedly in exchange for real-time expert virtual currency trading advice and for virtual currency purchasing and trading on behalf of the customers under McDonnell’s direction,” the CFTC says in a news release. Related news Share this article and your comments with peers on social media New York attorney general secures receiver for crypto firmcenter_img Bitcoin should face tough capital rules, Basel Committee says How should banks allocate capital for crypto? The court found “the supposedly expert, real-time virtual currency advice was never provided, and customers who provided funds to McDonnell and CDM to purchase or trade on their behalf never saw those funds again.” It also found they took steps to conceal their scheme by taking down their website and social media materials and ceasing communicating with their customers.The court ordered CDM and McDonnell to pay US$290,429 in restitution to customers, and a US$871,287 civil monetary penalty. It also imposed permanent trading and registration bans.“As the court’s judgment makes clear, the CFTC will continue to act aggressively to identify bad actors involved in virtual currencies and hold them accountable. This case also shows the CFTC’s readiness to prove its case at trial,” says James McDonald, CFTC director of enforcement, in a statement. Keywords Cryptoassets,  FraudCompanies Commodity Futures Trading Commission last_img read more

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Feb. 28: The government’s speech and the constitution

first_img Location See Description [email protected] For CLE Credits Public; Faculty; Staff; Students; Alumni; CLE Credit Contact Cost More Information When Wednesday, February 28, 2018 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM Sherman & Howard L.L.C., 633 17th St #3000, Denver, CO 80202center_img Moderated By Dean S. James Anaya Julie Ann Williams COLORADO LAW TALKS – The Government’s Speech and the Constitution Website http://www.cvent.com/events/the-government-s-speech-and-the-constitution/event-summary-9533a2c24ac24a998713fa111bb23c4e.aspx Sponsored By Sherman & Howard L.L.C. Under what circumstances does the government’s speech threaten equality or liberty such that it offends the Equal Protection or Due Process Clauses? And under what circumstances, if any, does the Constitution prohibit our government from lying to us?Governments have been speaking for as long as there have been governments; indeed, governments have to speak in order to govern. The list of ways in which the government communicates to the public is long and constantly growing. More traditional examples include resolutions, speeches, reports, press releases, press conferences, and radio and television addresses. New expressive technologies now empower government to speak in new ways through Twitter and other social media postings, webcasts, blogs, wikis, virtual worlds, and more. The government’s speech is unusually powerful precisely because of its governmental source. The government is unique among speakers because of its coercive power, its considerable resources, its often-privileged access to key information, and its wide variety of expressive roles as policymaker, employer, educator, property owner, and more, and through its speech, can educate, deceive, shame, inspire, scapegoat, silence, empower, challenge, comfort, distress, divert, and distract. This talk will focus on the ways in which the government’s speech performs constitutionally valuable functions, constitutional safeguards against and protections afforded government speech, and what we might call the dark side of the government’s speech. This discussion should be of interest to all, especially individuals who represent and counsel government agencies and other bodies about the constitutionality of their actions, as well as those who represent potential challengers to the government’s speech. Professor Helen Norton holds the Ira C. Rothgerber, Jr. Chair in Constitutional Law at the University of Colorado and is a former Deputy Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Justice. This event is free for all Colorado Law students, faculty, and staff, recent graduates (2012-2017), and Law Alumni Ambassadors, $10 for all other alumni, and $20 for other guests. CLE credit is requested, and a reception will follow the talk. Please register to attend by February 21 using the link below. Speakers Professor Helen Norton This event has ended. General: 1 Ethics: 0last_img read more

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