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CEG Announces Phish After Parties Line Up

first_imgEveryone knows that the party never stops when the band gets off the stage. This New Years Eve will be no exception, as CEG has just officially launched PhishAfterParties.com, the home of Phish After Parties for the band’s recently announced New Years Eve Run.This year’s line up includes:12/28 – Marco Benevento @ Highline Ballroom12/30 – Dead Sessions featuring The VT All Stars @ Highline12/30 – Wylyss & The NY Huster Ensemble/Kung Fu/The Heavy Pets featuring DJ sets from Speakerbot, Mr. Bonkerz, and DJs ConnetICON @ Rebel12/30 – Zach Deputy @ Gramercy TheaterCheck PhishAfterParties.com for ticket information and future show announcements.last_img read more

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first_imgLettuce will be hitting the Riviera Theatre in Chicago this New Year’s Eve to ring in 2016 on the funkiest foot possible, presented by Silver Wrapper and Jam Presents. They’ll be joined by friends Future Rock and Turbo Suit to make this a truly memorable night.We’re giving you the chance to win big! One lucky winner will receive:-(1) Hotel in Chicago for 12/31 (Location TBD)-(2) tickets to NYE w/ Lettuce at the Riviera Theatre-(2) tickets to NYE w/ Break Science (Late-Night) at Concord Music Hall-Meet + Greet with Members of Lettuce-(1) Lettuce signed CD & T-ShirtGet tickets to Lettuce at the Riviera Theatre with Future Rock and Turbo Suit here.Enter below, and share to increase your chances of winning! Winner will be selected on 12/18. Good luck!last_img read more

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Panel discusses paucity of designing women

first_imgWomen in Design, a student group at the Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD) that aims to increase the visibility of women in the field, kicked off its four-part spring symposium, “Progress in Process,” Thursday night (March 13) with a panel discussion on where women in architecture are now and where they are headed. Department of Architecture Chair Toshiko Mori moderated the event, which was held in Gund Hall’s Piper Auditorium and attracted a crowd of about 150 people — mostly, it was noted by panelists, women.“Where are all the male faculty members?” asked Sarah Williams Goldhagen, the architecture critic for New Republic magazine and formerly a professor at GSD. “This reinforces how important [this discussion] is and how marginalized the status of women is in the department and in the academy.”Despite impressive progress made in other businesses and professions since the beginning of the women’s movement in the 1960s, architecture remains a field dominated — some would say nearly monopolized — by men, who make up about 90 percent of practitioners. “There seems to be so little change from the early days when I started practicing in the ’50s,” said 80-year-old Beverly Willis, who founded her own firm, Willis and Associates, in 1976. She pointed out furthermore that there is very little research devoted to women in architecture, but noted that studies have shown the vast percentage of women become mothers during their working lives, and that in America, women still do 80 percent of child care and most housework.With its tight deadlines, long hours, and emergency all-nighters, architecture, the panelists agreed, is not a career suited to a family-oriented lifestyle. “The structure of the profession makes it so difficult for women to progress,” Goldhagen said. “It’s such a hostile environment for women who are caregivers.” One study, she said, found a 50 percent attrition rate for women entering the profession.“Today,” said Denise Scott Brown, “daddy and mommy are both on the mommy track.” But there are solutions. For example, Scott Brown’s firm, Venturi, Scott Brown, and Associates, has found that allowing people to work part time “gets them into management because they have their own projects.” Then, when their children get bigger, they are able to build on their early accomplishments rather than having to start over — or give it all up.“When I was in school I thought the generation before me would make it easier for my generation,” said Monica Ponce de Leon, a professor of architecture at GSD and principal of the firm Office dA. “It was a real shock for me when I [graduated] and got into the profession, how male-centered it is.” Every time she goes to a construction site or client meeting, Ponce de Leon continued, “there are 25 men in the room and me.”Ines LaMuniere, a founder of Devanthery & LaMuniere and a professor at the Swiss Institute of Technology in Lausanne, agreed, adding “when you come to a certain age, you realize that things have to be done. So I asked myself these past five years, ‘How can I act?’” She suggested giving women access to more work and a better quality of work, encouraging them to take part in professional associations and competitions, increasing research on gender in architecture, starting foundations that can provide grants for research and for postdocs, and reaching out to women in education, particularly as professors. “Every woman should think she has an action,” LaMuniere said. “And there is understanding of an action, but you have to start it.”Goldhagen also pointed out the “obligation” of women in the field to mentor younger female architects, and Beverly Willis mentioned the need to write the significant contributions of women into the histories of architecture — including in jobs on which they worked as collaborators with men, but were never given credit. She recounted what one colleague said to her: “I would love to teach classes about women in architecture, but where are the books? Where are the references?”After briefly discussing architecture as business as well as design and whether alpha males — who seem to make up a large percentage of clients — work better with men or women, Mori concluded that there’s “no such thing as a glass ceiling. I think it’s just one thick layer of men.”When a questioner in the audience asked whether amplifying the issue “so much in terms of feminism” might not alienate young architects like herself, the panelists agreed that framing the issue as one of gender is in fact necessary.“I worry for young women architects who say we don’t need the women’s movement,” said Scott Brown. All groups that are oppressed, she added, “need a time of nationalism,” and if younger people don’t understand that the issue is societal, then when they come up against it they are likely to blame themselves for any problems they encounter. “It’s no use putting yourself out of your group,” she said. “You will be persecuted. Solidarity is needed. It would help a lot if we were seen for the work we do, but also we have to have solidarity or we won’t get anywhere.”last_img read more

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Chase Elliott reveals Dover paint scheme with ties to first responders

first_imgChase Elliott and Hendrick Motorsports revealed a paint scheme for the No. 9 Chevrolet for this weekend’s NASCAR Cup Series action at Dover International Speedway that will aid first responders. To come up with the look, Hendrick and Mountain Dew teamed with Team Rubicon, an organization that uses the skills and experiences of military veterans and first responders to serve communities impacted by disasters.Proceeds from Mountain Dew’s sponsorship of Team Rubicon’s Fuel the Mission program will go to help disaster response operations and disaster response training programs.Elliott is coming off a win in Sunday’s GoBowling 235 at the Daytona International Speedway Road Course, his fourth road-course win out of eight Cup Series victories. The driver is currently fourth in the standings as the series heads to Dover for a doubleheader weekend of races, with only three races remaining in the regular season.Courtesy Hendrick Motorsportslast_img read more

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5 Dead in Michigan Crash

first_imgGREEN OAK TOWNSHIP, Mich. – Five people were killed Sunday afternoon in a crash that closed U.S. 23 between Lee Road and Silver Lake Road for several hours.last_img

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SMC group hosts world cinema festival

first_imgThis week, the College’s annual “World Cinema Festival” will emphasize women directors and strong female characters.Hosted by the Center for Womens Intercultural Leadership (CWIL) at Saint Mary’s, the weeklong series will feature five films in the Vander Valet Auditorium.Mana Derakhshani, associate director of CWIL, said a grant from Franco-American Cultural Exchange program called Tournées originally made the event possible. Since then, CWIL has been hosting this event every year.“This effort supports the internationalization of the campus in the curriculum with the Global Learning outcomes of the Sophia Program, in the increase in our study abroad opportunity in the expansion of exchange programs with international colleges and university,” Derakhshani said.According to a poster advertising the event, “The World Cinema Festival” will include the following films: “La Mujer sin Cabeza,” “The Indendies,” “A Separation,” “Talentine” and “Autumn Gem.”“La Mujer sin Cabeza” (the Headless Woman) is an Argentinean psychological-thriller film focusing on social class systems, and follows the life of a woman who after being impacted by an event becomes psychotic. The film records changes in Veronica’s psychological state after a life-changing incident.“The Indendies” is a Canadian film adapted from the play The Incendies focuses on the final wishes of a mother to send her two sons to the Middle East in search of their roots.“A Separation” is an Iranian film centers on the lives of an Iranian middle class couple who separate and have to deal with lower class care giver who cares for his father with Alzheimer’s.“Talentine” is a Malaysian comedy film about a group of young students who attempt to find their footing before stepping out into the real world. “Autumn Gem” is a Chinese documentary that explores the life of China’s first feminist Qiu Jem and her challenging traditional gender roles and demanding equal rights for women.Following the screening of “The Indendies,” first-year Melissa Mendez spoke highly of the film. “I like the plot twist and the war that became part of the story,” Melissa Mendez said. “I loved the war and revolt attacks.” Each film shown in the Festival aims to expose viewers to issues faced by international countries and step into the shoes of unique characters, according to advertising for the event. “I hope that this provides students with the opportunity to learn about other parts of the world, hear languages other than English and discover the cinematic art beyond Hollywood-type films,” Derakhshani said.Tags: CWILlast_img read more

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Generation Next 2015: Christina Johnson, Private Label Intl.

first_imgBeing one of the founders of a top interior design firm in the Valley hasn’t phased 32-year interior designer Christina Johnson.“It’s not a lot of ‘I’; it’s a lot of ‘we,’” Johnson says of the award-winning team that makes up the San Francisco- and Phoenix-based interior design firm Private Label International. The firm focuses on hospitality and real estate design, however there is a key aspect that sets it apart from the rest, says Johnson.“Most of our competitors are traditional interior design firms. Whereas we get involved a lot with the brand development and our scope is a little different. We do a lot of exterior work…and consulting when it comes to landscape and branding and logos and marketing and PR, so we end up looking at kind of the full spectrum of the project,” Johnson says.Johnson’s core role leans toward research, visioning and positioning of the business, creative direction and  anything that has to do with graphics and drawing.“We work a lot like a creative studio,” Johnson says.Private Label International may still be a relatively young firm at eight years old, but you wouldn’t be able to tell from looking at its award-winning and buzz-worthy projects, locally and out-of-state. To list a few: Calhoun Beach Club in Minneapolis, Minn., Preserve at Marin in San Francisco; The Herb Box in Scottsdale; and the seven stunning and vibrantly painted Cabana properties, developed by Deco Communities.With six apartment properties located throughout the Valley and one property in Vegas, the project is a personal favorite of Johnson, and not just because two of them won awards.“Locally, we did all of the Cabana properties, which have also been recognized here in the Valley as the Top 10 apartment complexes to work in. They’ve also started a trend, locally, of bringing in more exterior colors,” Johnson said.Regardless of the project, Johnson is not only focused on what is going to appeal to the client, but also what the design symbolizes.“When we work on a project, obviously we want it to look good and we want it to have a specific look, a specific style but the story is what’s important to us. What we’re giving back to the community is important to us,” Johnson says.With an expansive portfolio and years of experience, Johnson has learned the one thing  that is the most important when it comes to interior design.“It’s about the demographic that were targeting. So, while I have a personal style that rarely transcends into my interior design work because the way we approach it is we first research the demographic. What market are we trying to target, and what are their likes and dislikes? Is it traditional? Is it modern? What’s going to appeal to them?” Johnson says.last_img read more

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LAPS Thankful For Smith Auditorium Endowment

first_imgThe new acoustic shell taken during rehearsal for the Orion Weiss, left, and Shai Wosner performance Sunday at Duane Smith Auditorium. Photo by Peter LaDelfe/LACA Board MemberLAPS News:The Los Alamos Public Schools and the Los Alamos Community Foundation (LACF) have announced that the Endowment for Duane Smith Auditorium (DSA) has had a successful first year and is now actively paying out.These proceeds are used to fund the preservation needs of this valuable resource that serves not only LAPS, but the entire community. According to LACF Executive Director Rachel Kizielewicz the fund started earning interest with the establishing contribution from donors Joan Smith Brown and Kelly Myers in August 2018. Each year going forward the annual earnings from the fund will be put to immediate use.“It is rewarding to see an initial idea that Kelly and Joan had to preserve the auditorium for the community’s benefit now come to fruition. Over the past year, this fund has been supported by a number of people in the community,” Kizielewicz said. “As the endowment continues to mature, we look forward to the annual distributions being larger and even more impactful.” Superintendent Kurt Steinhaus said, “On behalf of the Los Alamos schools, we are very thankful and look forward to continuing to work with the Community Foundation for the benefit of students and everyone that uses the auditorium.”The first tangible example of the impact of these proceeds is the recent installation of a new sound shell for music performances at DSA. The Los Alamos Concert Association (LACA) used the sound shell for the first time on Sunday for Shai Wosner and Orion Weiss’ performance. The reception of the sound shell was positive.“The new shell is much easier (and safer!) to set up,” LACA Artistic Director Ann McLaughlin said.  She also noted that an unexpected bonus for LACA is that the new shell is more efficient in directing sound out into the audience.“We could really tell the difference and the wood grain finish looks great!” McLaughlin said. The Duane Smith Auditorium, originally called the Civic Auditorium, was built in 1950 and stood as the main facility in which local organizations could host plays and performances due to its spacious stage and seating area. The building was renamed in 1994 to Duane Smith Auditorium after well-loved LAPS Superintendent Duane Smith. The Los Alamos Community Foundation is excited to share that a donor has put forth $10,000 in matching funds, which will provide a dollar for dollar match to the next $10,000 in public contributions that are made to the fund. Contributions can be made via check (mailed to LACF, PO Box 1225, Los Alamos, NM 87544, with Endowment for Duane Smith Auditorium in the memo line), or online at www.losalamoscf.org, under the ‘giving’ tab, then ‘available funds’.About the Los Alamos Community Foundation: Established in 2015, the focus of the Los Alamos Community Foundation is to improve the quality of life in our community by inspiring, facilitating and supporting enduring philanthropy, and building the capacity of our local nonprofit organizations. The Los Alamos Community Foundation currently stewards six local endowment funds and total assets of more than $266,500. For more information about the Los Alamos Community Foundation, visit www.losalamoscf.org.Additional questions on ways to give to the fund can be directed to Kizielewicz at [email protected] or 505.661.4420.last_img read more

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Air Force Research Laboratory Remembers Fallen Airman

first_imgFrom left, Lt. Col. (USAF Ret.) Jim Mayo, Dr. Kelly Hammett, Karyn Newton, Stan Peplinski and Chaplain (Maj.) Craig Nakagawa at the remembrance ceremony for 2nd Lt. Guise Vander Linden Feb. 24 . Photo by Tyrell EtsittyBy JEANNE DAILYAir Force Research LaboratoryKirtland Force BaseKIRTLAND AFB — 2nd Lt. Guise Vander Linden was accidentally electrocuted Feb. 24, 1983, while conducting research in one of the laser laboratories at Kirtland AFB.Stan Peplinski, a senior scientist at the Air Force Research Laboratory, (AFRL), who shared a lab with Lt. Vander Linden, heard his cry and immediately sought and provided medical assistance. “Another colleague and I rushed to “Juice’s” aid, but there was nothing we could do to save him,” Peplinski said. “It was a tragic accident. I have anguished over his death many times, and I wanted to do something special for Lt. Vander Linden and his family. So I set in motion plans for the remembrance ceremony.”Attending the Feb. 24 ceremony were many scientists and engineers from AFRL’s Directed Energy Directorate. Upon his death, Lt. Vander Linden was survived by his parents Guise and Elodie Vander Linden and his sister Karyn. Remarkably, Peplinski was able to locate Lt. Vander Linden’s sister in California and she attended the service and participated as a very special guest.AFRL Directed Energy Director Dr. Kelly Hammett presided over the ceremony.“Today we are here to remember 2nd Lieutenant “Juice” Vander Linden who 37 years ago lost his life here in a tragic accident just down the hall in Lab 18,” Hammett said. “In those days, we were known as the Air Force Weapons Lab, and Lt. Vander Linden, a research scientist, was working for the Advanced Radiation Technology Office in the Advanced Resonator Optics Branch. Reflecting on this tragedy, we are reminded of the dangers we face in the field – and in the labs, securing our nation’s freedoms.”“Juice” was born in Honolulu, Hawaii. He was a Best of the Best Eagle Scout, a cadet in his college’s Reserve Officer Training Corps, and a 1981 graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where he received a degree in physics.Chaplain (Maj.) Craig Nakagawa, a member of the 377 Air Base Wing at Kirtland and a fellow native Hawaiian, led a moment of silence that began at 11:05 a.m. – the time of Vander Linden’s electrocution. Following the moment of silence, Nakagawa sang a Hawaiian song named “Kanaka Waiwai” while playing the ukulele.“The song offers the teaching of what is important in this life and in the life to come,” Nakagawa said. “It expresses how the path to Akua (God) is found through love (Aloha) and example (living righteously). It gives a statement that is universal by its depth and breadth of meaning. Hawaii’s culture is religiously diverse; which is a pride of Hawaii. The song’s popularity, which has been recorded by noted artists, crosses racial and religious lines.”Jim Mayo, a retired U.S. Air Force lieutenant colonel, who was “Juice’s” supervisor at the time, was notified of the accident immediately after it happened. He spoke about that day and his respect and admiration for “Juice.” Mayo had followed the ambulance to the hospital and entered the emergency room with him. “With my hand on Juice’s left knee, I experienced those final moments in the emergency room with this young Airman,” Mayo said as his faced showed anguish and sorrow.Mayo related a meaningful conversation he had had with the lieutenant only a few days before his death in which Vander Linden had spoken of recommitting his life to God and asked assistance in preparing his testimony of faith.“We are reminded that we do not enjoy today’s success, without looking to those who came before us,” Hammett said. “We have a responsibility to live up to their legacy, as we build upon their discoveries, and see their dreams turned into reality. Knowing what we now know about Lt. Vander Linden, it’s clear that from an early age he was inspired to do great things.” About AFRLAir Force Research Laboratory is the Air Force’s only organization wholly dedicated to leading the discovery, development and integration of warfighting technologies for air, space and cyberspace. AFRL is comprised of nine directorates located across the country. AFRL New Mexico is the proud home of two of those directorates: Directed Energy and Space Vehicles. AFRL Directed Energy Directorate director presents Karyn Newton, sister of 2nd Lt. Guise Vander Linden, a directorate coin at the Feb. 24 remembrance ceremony. Photo by Tyrell Etsittylast_img read more

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Sotheby’s secures new resi development director with trio of senior hires

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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