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SMC raises awareness for disorders

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s chapter of the National Student Speech Language Hearing Association (NSSHLA) hosted an event highlighting the professions available to students interested in communicative disorders Sunday. Current Saint Mary’s students and high school seniors from the South Bend community attended the free event to learn more about the professions and collect more information about the communicative disorders major at Saint Mary’s. The event featured student speakers, tours of the pathology and audiology labs at Saint Mary’s and a discussion panel with current speech and language pathologists and audiologists from the community. Senior Elizabeth Downs, vice president of the Saint Mary’s NSSHLA chapter, organized the event and spoke to prospective students. “We think it’s very important to promote our major because not many people know what we do,” she said. “It’s a great profession to go into, especially if you enjoy helping others. I fell in love with the intro class I took and I am really happy with my decision [to be a communicative disorders major].” Senior Lori LeClere, president of the Saint Mary’s NSSHLA chapter, said advertising the important need for communicative disorders majors was a goal of Sunday’s event. “We hope students learn about the career path — what they can do, where they can do it,” she said. “We want them to get an inside view of what speech pathology and audiology are. I came to Saint Mary’s without knowledge of the profession, so we feel it is necessary to educate others about what we do.” Downs and LeClere agreed that knowledge and awareness of professions in communicative disorders are crucial to getting more students interested in being involved. Some current communicative disorders majors were unaware that the major even existed before starting at Saint Mary’s. “I came to Saint Mary’s as a biology major,” junior Maria Malm said. “I had a general interest in helping others, and when I took the Intro to Communicative Disorders class and did my observation of others, I discovered I really enjoyed helping others. I decided to switch majors.” Malm said she hoped the NSSHLA event on Sunday stimulated more interest in the communicative disorders major, as the need for qualified therapists, pathologists and audiologists continues to rise. “Communication is essential to having high quality of life,” she said. “There is a great need for speech pathology to help others communicate their needs and wants. I look forward to helping others and getting a hands on feel for giving a voice to those with communicative disorders.”last_img read more

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Waterbury legislator Rebecca Ellis to join Shumlin Administration

first_imgVermont Business Magazine Governor Peter Shumlin and Agency of Natural Resources Secretary Deb Markowitz today announced that Waterbury Representative Rebecca Ellis will join ANR’s Department of Environmental Conservation as Senior Counsel for Government Affairs on August 10. Ellis resigned her seat as state representative for the Washington-Chittenden District yesterday. Gov. Shumlin will appoint a replacement before the start of the next legislative session in January.Ellis has served as a legislator since 2011, most recently as vice chair of the House Natural Resources and Energy Committee. Prior to her tenure in the Vermont Legislature, Ellis worked from 1997 to 2011 as an Assistant Attorney General for the State of Vermont, where her practice focused on environmental issues.Ellis has a strong background in local community service, both on the Waterbury Select Board and the Waterbury Planning Commission.  She played a leading role in Waterbury’s recovery from the flooding caused by Tropical Storm Irene in 2011, chaired Waterbury’s Long-Term Community Recovery Steering Committee, and continues to volunteer with Waterbury’s Floodplain Working Group.A native Vermonter, Rebecca graduated valedictorian from Burlington High School in 1982.  She has degrees from Harvard University (BA History), Princeton University (MPA) and Georgetown University (JD).  Upon her return to Vermont, she clerked for Justice John Dooley of the Vermont Supreme Court.“Rebecca brings a wealth of knowledge to her new role at the Agency of Natural Resources.  Her legal background combined with her legislative experience on environmental and energy issues will strengthen the Agency of Natural Resources’ core mission to protect Vermont’s environment,” said Secretary Markowitz.“I am excited to join the highly qualified staff at the Agency of Natural Resources and to implement policies that will help protect our air, soil and water.  Vermont, along with the world, is at a crossroads, with our future climate at stake.  I am honored to take a place at the Agency of Natural Resources at this vital moment,” said Ellis.Rebecca and her husband live in Waterbury with their two sons, ages 13 and 10.Source: Governor 8.5.2015last_img read more

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McClure funding available to increase access to college and careers

first_imgVermont Business Magazine The J Warren & Lois McClure Foundation has announced available funding for the 2018-19 school year for efforts that improve equitable access to the postsecondary and career education that leads to Vermont’s most promising jobs. A supporting organization of the Vermont Community Foundation, the McClure Foundation envisions a Vermont where no promising job goes unfilled for lack of a qualified applicant.The McClure Foundation’s primary interest is in funding projects with statewide impact that are aligned with multi-sector postsecondary attainment or workforce development efforts. For the 2018-19 school year, McClure Foundation funding will prioritize projects that accomplish one or more of the following: identify and/or eliminate barriers to postsecondary access and success for low-income and first-generation youth and adults; strengthen the pathways between education and employment; and change the narrative to ensure public recognition of postsecondary education and college and career readiness as a shared value.A primary goal of the McClure Foundation’s grantmaking program is to improve education and training pathways to jobs listed in Pathways to Promising Careers, a resource published in partnership with the Vermont Department of Labor. Pathways identifies 54 promising jobs expected to pay at least $20/hour and have at least 100 openings over the next decade. The resource is available online at mcclurevt.org/pathways(link is external).Nonprofits and municipal entities interested in applying for funding can submit a Letter of Interest (LOI) by 5:00 p.m. February 6, 2018. Additional information about the grant round is available at mcclurevt.org(link is external).The McClure Foundation is a supporting organization of the Vermont Community Foundation. The Vermont Community Foundation is a family of hundreds of funds and foundations established by Vermonters to serve their charitable goals. It provides the advice, investment vehicles, and back-office expertise to make giving easy and effective. The Foundation also provides leadership in giving by responding to community needs, mobilizing and connecting philanthropists to multiply their impact, and by keeping Vermont’s nonprofit sector vital with grants and other investments in the community.Source: Vermont Community Foundation. 1.2.2018. vermontcf.org(link is external) or call 802-388-3355 for more information.last_img read more

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first_imgThe Hattie’s Coffee building at Corinth Square is slated to get a facelift.Representatives of First Washington Realty, the Bethesda, Md.-based company that purchased the Village Shops, Corinth Square and the Fairway Shops last year, told the Prairie Village City Council on Monday that they were planning on moving forward with plans to renovate the Hattie’s Coffee building at Corinth Square.A preliminary rendering of the renovation concept showed a refreshed exterior that features the same exposed cedar paneling that is a part of the facade of the Hen House Market installed in 2012. The improvements would also include the addition of an outdoor patio attached to Hattie’s, a sidewalk that connects Somerset Drive to the building, and improved signage for tenants.The improvements would be paid for in part with funds from the Community Improvement District at Corinth Square.The announcement came as part of an update to the governing body that came at the request of the city council. While First Washington representatives Alex Nyhan and Monica Mallory focused on the success the company has had since taking over in keeping long-standing tenants and in making improvements to the shops — including the recent repaving of the Village Shops parking lot – members of the city council took the opportunity to express concerns with the lines of communication between the company and the tenants.Councilor Jori Nelson spent several minutes relaying conversations she’d had with Village Shops tenants who said they were “nervous about the future of the centers.”Nelson said tenants had told her that First Washington had assumed a much more aggressive negotiating posture than previous owners, and that some felt that they had to hire an attorney to represent them in lease negotiations for the first time.Nyhan responded that First Washington’s strategy was to retain all of the existing tenants, and that thus far they have been successful in that approach.“Yes, there are negotiations,” he said. “But we’re retaining everybody, which I think it great.”Both Nelson and Mayor Laura Wassmer expressed concern that tenants did not have a clear channel of communication open with the company’s Bethesda-based staff, though they noted that the Kansas City-based representatives had been excellent to work with.“I know you care about our local merchants,” Wassmer said, “but there is a disconnect there. There is something that isn’t quite the way it should be.”Wassmer encouraged Nyhan to arrange time to meet directly with local tenants to improve relations. He said he appreciated the feedback and thought it was a good idea.last_img read more

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McGrane, Jaramillo reappointed to BarFoundation’s board

first_img March 15, 2008 Regular News McGrane, Jaramillo reappointed to BarFoundation’s board M cGrane, Jaramillo reappointed to Bar Foundation’s boardFormer Bar President Miles A. McGrane III and Miami attorney Julio C. Jaramillo have been reappointed to three-year terms on The Florida Bar Foundation Board of Directors.The Bar Board of Governors made those appointments at its recent Tallahassee meeting. The new terms begin July 1. Foundation board members are term-limited to two three-year terms.last_img read more

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first_imgShare on Twitter Share on Facebook Email Pinterest Sharecenter_img LinkedIn Over the past few years, cats have increasingly attracted media attention due to a number of scientific studies reporting that a Toxoplasma Gondii (T. Gondii) infection is linked with mental health issues, including schizophrenia, suicide and intermittent rage disorder. Since domestic cats are the primary hosts of T. Gondii – that is, they provide an environment within which this parasite can reproduce – it is often speculated that cat ownership may put people at increased risk of mental illness, by exposing them to it.However, only a handful of small studies have found evidence to support a link between owning a cat and psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia. And most of these investigations have serious limitations. For instance, they relied on small samples, did not specify how participants were selected, and did not appropriately account for the presence of missing data and alternative explanations. This can often lead to results that are born out of chance or are biased.To tackle these limitations, we conducted a study using data from approximately 5,000 children who took part in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children between 1991 and 1992. Since then, these children and their families have been followed up to gather information on their health, as well as on their demographic, social and economic circumstances. So, unlike previous studies, we were able to follow people over time, from birth to late adolescence, and address a number of the limitations of previous research, including controlling for alternative explanations (such as income, occupation, ethnicity, other pet ownership and over-crowding) and taking into account missing data.We studied whether mothers who owned a cat while pregnant; when the child was four years old; and 10 years old, were more likely to have children who reported psychotic symptoms, such as paranoia or hallucinations, at age 13 and 18 years of age. Although most people who experience psychotic symptoms in adolescence will not develop psychotic disorders later in life, these symptoms often indicate an increased risk for such disorders and other mental illnesses, including depression.So are cats bad for your mental health? Probably, not.We found that children who were born and raised in households that included cats at any time period – that is, pregnancy, early and late childhood – were not at a higher risk of having psychotic symptoms when they were 13 or 18 years old. This finding in a large, representative sample did not change when we used statistical techniques to account for missing data and alternative explanations. This means that it is unlikely that our results are explained by chance or are biased.While this finding is reassuring, there is evidence linking exposure to T. Gondii in pregnancy to a risk of miscarriage and stillbirth, or health problems in the baby. In our study, we could not directly measure exposure to T. Gondii, so we recommend that pregnant women should continue to avoid handling soiled cat litter and other sources of T. Gondii infection, such as raw or undercooked meats, or unwashed fruit and vegetables. That said, data from our study suggests that owning a cat during pregnancy or in early childhood does not pose a direct risk for offspring having psychotic symptoms later in life.By Francesca Solmi, Research Associate, UCL and James Kirkbride, Reader, UCLThis article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.last_img read more

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Time for Exchange

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Orchard expects bumper harvest in Lichfield

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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How to follow an impressive debut

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

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CONCACAF to implement new club competition

first_imgCONCACAF is to implement a two-tiered football competition for affiliated clubs for Caribbean Member Associations, starting in 2018, in an attempt to boost plans to raise the standard of the sport in the region.The Caribbean Professional Club Championship (CPCC) for Tier One clubs is to be contested by the winner and runner-up clubs of the top professional and semi-professional Leagues in Year 1 (2018).However, 2019 and onwards, only clubs from leagues that are fully professional will be eligible to participate in this competition. Automatic Champions league qualificationThe winner of the CPCC will qualify automatically for the Scotiabank CONCACAF Champions League (2019 SCCL edition). The second and third place teams will qualify for the CONCACAF League 2018.CONCACAF will focus most of its resources on the CPCC. This includes a subsidy for air travel for the clubs and covering 100 per cent of hotel, meals and ground transportation for the teams and match officials. Prize monies will also be introduced for this competition, a first for the Caribbean. For the CACC, a lower level of subsidy will be provided and no prize monies are contemplated. Club licensing systemThe CONCACAF Club Licensing system, which became mandatory in 2016, will form the foundation of the eligibility platform. The designation of the member associations’ league will be based on a CONCACAF League Survey, to be completed by member associations.Meanwhile, the Caribbean Amateur Club Championship (CACC) (Tier 2), will be open to the champion club of the top League in member association that have no professional or semi-professional league in year one (2018) and to amateur and semi-professional leagues in Year Two – 2019 and onwards.last_img read more

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