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10-Year-Old Shemar Willis Wins 2013 JIS Heritage Essay Competition

first_imgRelatedMinister Falconer Returns to Alma Mater for Motivational Session Story HighlightsThe Maxfield Primary and Junior High School student is the first male to cop the top prize in the three-year history of the contest, beating out more than 70 rivals.A visibly proud Shemar told JIS News that he felt “overwhelmed” at copping the top prize, pointing out that he felt pleased that his hard work has paid off. Chief Executive Officer, JIS, Donna-Marie Rowe, said the essay competition is part of the agency’s thrust in educating children on the country’s rich heritage and encouraging them to participate in national life. RelatedMinister Falconer Clarifies ‘Guidelines’ to Media RelatedTime Ripe For Media To Set Up Complaints Council – Minister Falconer Photo: JIS PhotographerGovernor-General, His Excellency the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen (right), and Chief Executive Officer, Jamaica Information Service (JIS), Donna-Marie Rowe, share in the proud moment of JIS 2013 Heritage Essay Competition winner, Shemar Willis. The Maxfield Primary and Junior High School student raises his trophy in triumph, at the awards ceremony held today (Nov. 29), at King’s House. Advertisementscenter_img 10-Year-Old Shemar Willis Wins 2013 JIS Heritage Essay CompetitionJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail 10-Year-Old Shemar Willis Wins 2013 JIS Heritage Essay Competition InformationNovember 30, 2013Written by: Athaliah Reynolds-Baker It was a moment of sheer pride and utter jubilation for 10-year old Shemar Willis, as he was announced the winner of the Jamaica Information Service’s (JIS) 2013 Heritage Essay competition during an awards ceremony held today (November 29) at King’s House.The Maxfield Primary and Junior High School student is the first male to cop the top prize in the three-year history of the contest, beating out more than 70 rivals.It was his outstanding essay on the topic: ‘What Makes Our Jamaican Heritage Special?’ that placed him ahead of his competitors. He also took the sectional prize for Best Entry in the 10-year old category.Shemar took home the coveted prizes of a weekend for four at Franklyn D. Resort, St. Ann; book voucher from Sangster’s Book Store; a printer from Royale Computers and Accessories; gift baskets courtesy of Lasco Distributors and GraceKennedy; $15,000 in cash from National Commercial Bank (NCB) Foundation; a Samsung E2200 mobile phone sponsored by Digicel Jamaica; a Samsung Galaxy tablet from Singer; and a trophy.A visibly proud Shemar told JIS News that he felt “overwhelmed” at copping the top prize, pointing out that he felt pleased that his hard work has paid off.Second place went to 11-year-old Tristan Isaacs of Jessie Ripoll Primary School, while nine-year old Mountain View Primary student, Jayla Smith, placed third. They received trophies, gift baskets, cash and other prizes.Keynote speaker, Governor-General, His Excellency the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen, congratulated the JIS for organising the annual essay competition, which he deemed “an excellent initiative”.He also commended all those who took part in the contest, pointing out that they are helping to ensure that Jamaica remains firmly rooted in the best of its heritage. “In this, you are all champions,” he stated.Taking the audience on a journey of Jamaica’s rich cultural heritage, the Governor-General said it is up to all of us to ensure that this is passed on to the younger generation.“Jamaica’s history, from the Tainos to Spanish colonisation, through to British colonial plantocracy and slavery, from Emancipation to Independence and beyond, forged the rich and diverse cultural heritage of which we boast today,” he stated.He noted that individuals and groups such as Marcus Garvey, Louise Bennett Coverley “Miss Lou”, Bob Marley, Jamaica Folk Singers, and the National Dance Theatre Company (NDTC), have done their part in ensuring that this rich heritage not only remains relevant and alive, but is transported across the globe, impacting those near and far.“For a tiny island such as ours to have such an impact on the world, we are indeed a special people. There is so much that is good about Jamaica and that is what we should be focussing on,” he said.Chief Executive Officer, JIS, Donna-Marie Rowe, said the essay competition is part of the agency’s thrust in educating children on the country’s rich heritage and encouraging them to participate in national life.She noted that the success of the 2011 and 2012 competitions strengthened the JIS’ resolve to continue to engage the minds of Jamaica’s children to think about the different aspects of their heritage and what it means to them.“The essay competition is near and dear to our hearts, because it is, for us, a barometer for the teaching, learning and understanding of Jamaican heritage to our children across the nation,” she stated.last_img read more

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Jamaica Secures 2 Million Airlift Seats for Summer Season

first_imgRelatedTimeshare Concept To Be Added To Tourism Product Jamaica Secures 2 Million Airlift Seats for Summer Season ParliamentMay 28, 2014Written by: Douglas McIntosh Story HighlightsJamaica has secured two million airlift seats for stopover visitors, out of its traditional tourist markets of the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom/Europe, for the upcoming 2014 summer tourist season.1.4 million seats have been secured out of the United States, an increase of 11 per cent.The USA, Canada, and UK/Europe continue to be Jamaica’s major source markets for stopover arrivals. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Photo: JIS PhotographerMinister of Tourism and Entertainment, the Hon. Dr. Wykeham McNeill making his contribution to the 2014/2015 Sectoral Debate on Tuesday, May 27. RelatedBeaches To Be Improved For Public Accesscenter_img Jamaica Secures 2 Million Airlift Seats for Summer SeasonJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay Related150 Jobs for First Phase of Kingston Wharves Logistics Project Jamaica has secured two million airlift seats for stopover visitors, out of its traditional tourist markets of the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom/Europe, for the upcoming 2014 summer tourist season.Tourism and Entertainment Minister, Hon. Dr. Wykeham McNeill, has informed that 1.4 million seats have been secured out of the United States, an increase of 11 per cent; 260,000 out of Canada, a 21.6 per cent increase; and 163,000 out of the UK/Europe, representing a 10 per cent increase.The Minister made the announcement during his 2014/15 Sectoral Debate presentation in the House of Representatives on May 27, under the theme – ‘Tourism:  Delivering on its Promise of Opportunities and Growth’.Dr. McNeill noted that the USA, Canada, and UK/Europe continue to be Jamaica’s major source markets for stopover arrivals. He informed that the North American market, comprising the United States and Canada, account for 80 per cent of arrivals to Jamaica.The Minister said the United States has remained “our main market” over the past several years and pointed out that while arrivals from that country have grown, “we believe we can do better, and will be paying particular attention to this market.”“The good news is that Southwest Airlines, the largest US carrier, with connections to most cities in America, will (commence) operating flights to Sangster International Airport (in Montego Bay) on July 1. This will bring exciting new opportunities for penetrating the US market, even further,” he added.In relation to Canada, which he described as Jamaica’s second largest visitor source market, Dr. McNeill said the country is poised to benefit from increased arrivals out of this destination.Following four years of decline experienced with the United Kingdom market, Dr. McNeill said Jamaica began to experience a resurgence out of that destination                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              in 2013.He advised that increased demand for travel to Jamaica has resulted in a 70 per cent increase in airlift from the UK over the last two years.“Last year, we had growth of 4.7 per cent, and the early figures up to February, show 9.2 per cent growth, which confirms the rebound in this critical market,” the Minister  said.He also welcomed the UK’s institution of a revised and “more equitable method” of calculating its Air Passenger Duty (APD), adding that “we are confident (this) will give further momentum in that market.”In relation to the wider European market, Dr. McNeill noted that the region has been “performing well,” having faced the “worst economic challenges” in recent years.The Minister pointed out that the city of Munich became Germany’s newest “gateway” to Jamaica, beginning November 2013. He argued that the city will be an important channel for potential visitors from Germany’s southern region, as well as German-speaking nations, and countries in Eastern Europe.Dr. McNeill said the Russian market has been a “major breakthrough” for Jamaica, and that since establishing connections with that country in January 2013, it has delivered nearly 14,500 visitors, with over 12,000 arriving in last year.“So successful was the new service that the operator had applied to provide scheduled service. However, current events in Ukraine have (delayed) those plans. We have continued to have dialogue with the operators and are hopeful that this situation can be resolved and we will see a return to service from this important source market,” he added.Dr. McNeill advised that under an initiative targeting Scandinavian countries, direct flights between Stockholm, Sweden and Montego Bay, commenced during the 2013 winter season, with each flight being provided by tour operators, Thomas Cook and TUI.“This has been of particular significance because it is a fourteen day rotation generating individual stays of said length.  This year we will see the addition in November of two new gateways, Helsinki and Copenhagen, and due to this we confidently expect growth from these Scandinavian markets,” the Minister said. Advertisementslast_img read more

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Do Not Steal NIC Property

first_imgRelatedMinister Pickersgill to Tour Port Antonio Water and Sewerage Project RelatedEarthquake Awareness Programme Underway In Westmoreland FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Members of the public are urged to desist from stealing National Irrigation Commission (NIC) property, such as water meters, pipes and pumping equipment, by Director of Engineering and Technical Service, Milton Henry.In an interview with JIS News, Mr. Henry said the NIC has been grappling with this problem for years.“We have lost millions of dollars due to the theft of our property and this has led to disruption of our operations and significant inconvenience to customers,” he noted.“We have received reports that several water meters in the Lakes Pen area of St. Catherine have been stolen. This has been reported to the Spanish Town Police Station, which is investigating the matter,” Mr. Henry added.Persons are reminded that the theft of NIC property is a criminal offence, which can lead to a three-year custodial sentence under the Irrigation Act.The National Irrigation Commission Limited, an agency of the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, is the primary provider of irrigation services to the agricultural sector.It provides irrigation water within the districts of St. Dorothy, Rio Cobre and Colbeck, St. Catherine; Yallahs, St. Thomas; Mid-Clarendon; Braco, Trelawny; New Forest/Duff House in Manchester; Hounslow and Beacon/Little Park, St. Elizabeth and Seven Rivers in St. James. Do Not Steal NIC Property EnvironmentJanuary 28, 2015Written by: Judith A. Huntercenter_img RelatedClimate Change Policy and Action Plan to be Tabled this Month Story HighlightsMembers of the public are urged to desist from stealing National Irrigation Commission (NIC) property, such as water meters, pipes and pumping equipment, by Director of Engineering and Technical Service, Milton Henry.In an interview with JIS News, Mr. Henry said the NIC has been grappling with this problem for years.Persons are reminded that the theft of NIC property is a criminal offence, which can lead to a three-year custodial sentence under the Irrigation Act. Advertisementslast_img read more

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Uncertain Fate for Flathead Tribal Water Compact

first_imgEarlier this week a legislative committee heard hours of impassioned testimony from supporters and opponents of a proposed tribal water rights compact that would affect the Flathead Indian Reservation and much of western Montana. Meanwhile, the Legislature is considering other legislation that would postpone a final decision on the water agreement, while the outcome of a pending Montana Supreme Court case on one component of the settlement could also influence the compact’s fate.The March 27 House Judiciary Committee hearing was packed both inside the state Capitol committee room and outside in the hall with irrigators, landowners, attorneys and residents there to comment on the proposed water rights agreement.The intent of the agreement – called a compact – is to forever clarify and quantify the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes’ water rights both on and off the Flathead Indian Reservation, while protecting existing uses and rights. The off-reservation component is unique among the state’s tribal water settlements.The House committee took no immediate action on House Bill 629, which proposes to ratify the compact and calls on the state to pay $55 million for water projects on the reservation, including $30 million in improvements to the Flathead Indian Irrigation Project.The Legislature, U.S. Congress, tribal government and Montana Water Court must all approve the settlement, a process that could take years and begins with the Legislature first taking action.A long line of irrigators and landowners spoke in opposition to the compact, with some arguing that the public needs more time to understand the vast document and that the agreement needs to be tweaked before final approval. Some irrigators said they will receive less water after the compact, which could significantly damage their livelihoods. Opponents also said the compact could potentially restrict future development. But proponents – including a number of irrigators – also flooded into the hearing, arguing that detractors’ concerns are being driven by misinformation and that the settlement is ready to be ratified after a decade of negotiations. They maintain that years of scientific research, data compilation and public meetings have produced an equitable agreement that is a much better alternative than letting the issue play out in litigation – which they say will inevitably occur without a compact.Tribal members, including elected officials, spoke in favor of the compact, as did members of the Montana Reserved Water Rights Compact Commission, which has negotiated compacts with the state’s six other reservations. And an attorney representing Gov. Steve Bullock offered “strong support from the governor’s office.”The compact commission is trying to finalize its last remaining final compact before it expires this year, though Kalispell Sen. Verdell Jackson has proposed a measure to extend the commission so it has more time to work on the Flathead compact. Jackson’s proposal would move the commission’s expiration date from July 1 of this year to July 1 of 2015. The commission was established in 1979.Jackson’s Senate Bill 265 cleared the Senate by a vote of 31-19 in February and then was moved forward by a 10-6 vote in the House Natural Resources committee last week. The Kalispell Republican spoke in opposition to ratifying the compact at the March 27 hearing.Rep. Dan Salomon, R-Ronan, originally proposed a bill to ratify the compact but dropped it because he didn’t think it had enough support to pass the Legislature. He then introduced an alternative bill calling for a two-year legislative study of the compact, with ratification to occur in 2015. But the Ronan Republican also spoke at the March 27 hearing in favor of ratifying the compact now. He says he is in a unique position to comment on the agreement as an elected representative from Ronan, an irrigator and a member of the compact commission. Rep. Kathleen Williams, D-Bozeman, proposed HB 629 after Salomon announced he wasn’t going to introduce his bill.“You’re hearing opponents say we need more time, we need more time, but not really any suggestions,” Williams said at the hearing. “So you wouldn’t know as a compact commission what to change. I think all of the criticisms have been addressed. I understand that it’s scary, but I do think the compact is ready.” Email Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox.last_img read more

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Australia: DeGrussa solar project wins environmental award

first_img“The project has been visited by miningcompanies, government representatives, universities and schools, and has beenshowcased around the world to educate the global mining industry about how totransition to renewable energy.” Read more regional news here Sign up for the ESI Africa newsletter The project consists of a 10.6MW tracking PV project together with a 6MW battery coupled with a hybrid control system, which juwi developed, constructed and has been operating and maintaining since 2016. UNDP China, CCIEE launch report to facilitate low-carbon development Judges notes say it generated 17 to 20 per cent of the DeGrussa Copper-Gold Mine’s total power requirement, with 34,080 solar photovoltaic panels reducing Sandfire’s carbon emissions by 30,789 tonnes since 2016. AFD and Eskom commit to a competitive electricity sector TAGSAustraliasolar power Previous articleEquatorial Guinea touted favourable economic indicators at WEFNext articleAfDB, is the first development bank to win procurement award Ashley TheronAshley Theron-Ord is based in Cape Town, South Africa at Clarion Events-Africa. She is the Senior Content Producer across media brands including ESI Africa, Smart Energy International, Power Engineering International and Mining Review Africa. The DeGrussa Solar Project RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img The award was one of the Department of Mines, Industry Regulation and Safety’s 2019 Resources Sector Awards for Excellence announced recently in Perth, Australia. juwi Australia has announced that the Sandfire DeGrussa Hybrid Project in Western Australia, has won the Western Australian Government’s Department of Mines, Industry Regulation and Safety’s, 2019 Golden Gecko Award for Environmental Excellence. Generation Finance and Policy BRICS Low carbon, solar future could increase jobs in the future – SAPVIA Golden Gecko Awards for Environmental Excellence recognise leading practice and innovation in environmental management and provide an opportunity to share experiences between government, industry and the community. “The DeGrussa Solar Project has provided ablueprint for the adoption of renewable energy at other mine sites around theworld,” the judges said.last_img read more

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REVIEW – Hamilton: serious entertainment, seriously entertaining

first_imgSmash-hit Hamilton has landed at London’s newly-reopened Victoria Palace Theatre. Jessamy Chapman reviews itHamilton is now playing in the West End. PHOTO: Joan Marcus/Public TheaterBroadway’s latest smash hit has landed in London, offering audiences the chance to see a musical that is truly like no other.Hamilton is the story of the “other” Founding Father of America, Alexander Hamilton (Jamael Westman), an orphan and migrant to the young country, a fierce proponent of independence, and a man of incredible intelligence. Written by Lin-Manuel Miranda, the rapped and sung musical follows Hamilton at lightning pace as he makes friends with other revolutionaries, becomes George Washington’s right-hand man, and helps to win the War of Independence.The second act, set post-war, sees him become a lawyer and produce reams of economic policy and government papers, the foundation of America – all while he struggles in an all-too-modern way with his personal life, with tragedy, and with his political rivals. There’s a strong theme of legacy, and a message that our own legacy is not something we can control.The musical teems with notable, engaging characters – from the stately figure of George Washington, the magnificently flamboyant Thomas Jefferson, and the best-friend-turned-enemy Aaron Burr, to Hamilton’s loyal wife Eliza Schuyler, her wistful sister Angelica, and the frankly ludicrous George III.The unceasing pace of the music means it’s a bit of an effort sometimes to keep up, but it’s also relentlessly entertaining, and the songs will have you hooked for weeks. Our favourites were ‘Alexander Hamilton’, ‘My Shot’, ‘Satisfied’, ‘The Room Where It Happens’ and ‘Hurricane’ – the cabinet rap battles are great fun too.With an almost wholly non-white cast, and a musical score that includes hip-hop, RnB and soul as well as operetta, it faithfully tells the story of this remarkable man in a way that’s designed to make you think – about immigration, about multiculturalism, and about how the world is shaped.last_img read more

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Turkish opposition criticizes refugee plan with EU

first_imgThe Turkish government came under heavy criticism from opposition leader Kemal Kılıçdaroğlu for demanding €3 billion extra funding from the European Union to deal with the influx of refugees, Turkish media reported on Friday.Kılıçdaroğlu, leader of the main opposition Republican People’s Party, accused the government of “turning Turkey into a buffer province,” in comments to the Hürriyet newspaper.Europe would take in all the university graduates among the refugees and send the rest back to Turkey, he said, adding: “Signing such a deal discriminating between migrants and disrespecting human dignity is against human rights.” At this week’s emergency summit in Brussels, Turkey offered to take back the economic migrants landing in Greece in exchange for Syrian refugees in Turkey being distributed among EU members under a quota system. The deal, however, has yet to be confirmed at another summit taking place on March 17-18.“We can give them (the EU) €6 billion and they can take all the Syrians, Afghanis, Pakistanis,” Kılıçdaroğlu commented on the deal.He is not the only one to criticize the “one in, one out” pact. The head of the U.N. refugee agency and various human rights groups have cast doubt on its legitimacy Austrian Interior Minister Johanna Mikl-Leitner called the deal “questionable”. Also On POLITICO Juncker: EU-Turkey refugee deal could require legislative change By Vince Chadwick MEPs warn against ‘blank checks’ for Turkey By Maïa de La Baumelast_img read more

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By sea and land, Turkey raises tensions with EU

first_imgAt a summit earlier this month, EU heads of state and government issued conclusions expressing the possibility of launching “a positive political EU-Turkey agenda” but also warned that “in case of renewed unilateral actions or provocations in breach of international law, the EU will use all the instruments and the options at its disposal,” an unmistakable reference to sanctions. On Saturday, Turkey effectively thumbed its nose at that warning, by announcing plans to extend a controversial gas exploration mission in the Mediterranean at least until November 4. Asked about the strains with Turkey, a Commission spokesman, Peter Stano, said: “We have expectations of Turkey if we are to continue in a positive domain with our relationship. However if we keep on getting these provocations, if we keep getting tension with the European Union or members of the European Union, we must think a little more seriously about what we are going to do.” Leaders said they would return to the Turkey issue and make a decision at their summit in December, but some officials, especially from Greece and Cyprus, have made clear their view that pointed action is needed. Council President Charles Michel, responding to Erdoğan’s comments on Sunday night, tweeted: “Rather than a positive agenda, Turkey chooses provocations, unilateral actions in the Mediterranean and now insults. It’s intolerable.” David McAllister, a German member of the European Parliament who is chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee, said the EU would act if Ankara did not stop its incendiary actions and comments. “Unfortunately, the Turkish government is not taking concrete steps to de-escalate the current situation,” McAllister said. “Any kind of provocations are unacceptable and must be stopped immediately. As the European Union, we stand united by our member states. The European Parliament has asked the Council to stand ready to draw up a list of further restrictive measures if no substantial progress is made in cooperation with Turkey.” Germany also came forward Monday to express support for France.“We stand in solidarity with our French friends, especially in the fight against Islamic extremists,” the German foreign minister, Heiko Maas, tweeted. “The attacks of @RTErdogan against @EmmanuelMacron are a new low and completely unacceptable.” But Maas also added a careful distinction that seemed aimed at avoiding becoming embroiled in any dispute. “We do not accept to mix things up here,” he wrote. “There are millions of upright citizens of Muslim faith in Germany. One must defend itself against violent Islamists and murderers. Those who equate this with racism and Islamophobia act irresponsibly.”Maïa de La Baume, Jacopo Barigazzi and Hans von der Burchard contributed reporting. CORRECTION: This article has been updated to correct the name of the Commission spokesman. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s provocations — including saying Emmanuel Macron needs “mental treatment” — have angered the EU and could lead to punitive action, the European Commission warned on Monday. Erdoğan’s insults against the French president — tied to Macron’s response to the beheading of a teacher in a Paris suburb earlier this month —  drew swift condemnation from EU leaders on Sunday. But Turkey has also continued to exacerbate tensions over gas exploration in a disputed area of the Eastern Mediterranean, raising the prospect of a serious diplomatic breach, or even EU sanctions, officials said. In a statement on Sunday, the Turkish Foreign Ministry accused France of creating the recent tensions and complained of the “continued one-sided and egocentric approaches of France” and of “the West’s usual double standards” in its defense of cartoons offensive to Muslims under the umbrella of free expression.last_img read more

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Three Harvard faculty members net MacArthur fellowships

first_imgThree biologists — one current and two future faculty members at Harvard — have won MacArthur Foundation “genius” grants, $500,000 no-strings-attached awards intended to encourage creativity, originality, and innovation in a broad array of fields.The winners are Assistant Professor of Neurobiology Rachel Wilson at Harvard Medical School,  Susan Mango, now at the University of Utah, and Kristen Bomblies, currently at the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, in Tubingen, Germany. Mango will be a professor in the department of molecular and cellular biology in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences; and Bomblies will be an assistant professor in the department of organismic and evolutionary biology, both beginning July 1, 2009.“It’s a big shock. Unlike all the other grants and awards, you don’t apply for this one,” Wilson said. “As a scientist, you’re trained to think about a project then about how to fund it. It feels very backward to have people give you money and say, ‘Now, go figure out what to do with it.’”Wilson and Mango are among 25 recipients announced today by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, which began the MacArthur Fellows Program in 1981 as its first grant-making initiative. Over the years, awards have gone out to 781 people, ranging in age from 18 to 82.“The MacArthur Fellows Program celebrates extraordinarily creative individuals who inspire new heights in human achievement,” said MacArthur Foundation President Jonathan Fanton. “With their boldness, courage, and uncommon energy, this new group of fellows, men and women of all ages in diverse fields, exemplifies the boundless nature of the human mind and spirit.”The MacArthur Fellows Program accepts no applications. Instead, nominations are submitted in a secretive process that culminates in the surprise announcement to fellows.Both Mango and Wilson are Harvard graduates, with Mango earning her bachelor’s degree in 1983 and Wilson in 1996.Wilson, who received her doctorate from the University of California, San Francisco, in 2001, conducted her early research on how neurons and certain neurotransmitters function in the formation of long-term memory. Her current focus is on how nerve cells function to detect odors in one’s sense of smell. The MacArthur Foundation said her work opens new avenues for exploring the broader issue of how neural circuits are organized to sense the environment around us.Wilson heard about the award just over a week ago, as she, her husband, and her parents were preparing to take a few days away in a lighthouse keeper’s former home near Provincetown, Mass. The award, she said, was a complete surprise. Though she’s had some time to digest the news since then, Wilson still hasn’t decided how to make use of the fellowship award, though she pointed out that even without money, the publicity that accompanies it would help recruit fellows and students to her lab.“It’s a great way to attract people to your lab. The money is nothing if you don’t have good people,” Wilson said.Mango, who received a doctorate from Princeton University in 1990, uses approaches from the fields of genetics, genomics, ecology, and embryology to examine the question of how complex organs form. Mango conducts much of her work on nematode worms, focusing on how the creature’s pharynx forms. Though much attention has been paid to how specific tissues form, Mango focuses on how those tissues interact and create a single functioning organ. She has identified a gene, pha-4, as crucial to the coordinated development of the worm’s pharynx.Jeremy Bloxham, dean of science in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, in speaking about Mango’s appointment to the Harvard faculty, said recently that Mango is a leader in the field of organogenesis. He called her research “groundbreaking” and said it “opened alternative ways of thinking” about development.Kirsten Bomblies is currently finishing her post-doctoral fellowship at the Max Planck.  She works on the molecular genetics of development and pathogen resistance in Arabidopsis and other plants.last_img read more

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Pennsylvania Communities Create Ambulance Share Agreement

first_imgWNEP– Four communities in the Wilkes-Barre area are joining together to provide what they hope will be better ambulance service.Officials said this new agreement will cut down response time. Residents said it’s about time communities started working together.Ken Vanderheggen knows in an emergency seconds count. His wife is a heart patient. That’s why he’s excited to hear that his hometown, Hanover Township, has joined three others in a new mutual aid agreement.“I know if I call 911 she will get an ambulance no matter what. That’s important to me for her to have an ambulance,” said Vanderheggen.Ambulance crews from Hanover Township, Plains Township, Wilkes-Barre, and Kingston, will all help each other answer calls during busy times.“Partnership is what we need for emergency response. We’ve seen that since post 9/11 and we are just working towards that goal toward the future,” said Wilkes-Barre Fire Chief Jay Delaney.“We do around 3,000 calls a year. They (Wilkes-Barre Ambulance) do double what we do so we will be coming here more than they are coming to us but it’s great to know that if we are unavailable they will come over to us too,” said Kingston-Forty Fort Fire Chief Frank Guido.“Now we have units that will arrive quicker. They know where they are going and have their outlined areas and the response time will be greatly improved,” said David Parsnik, the executive director of the Luzerne County 9-1-1.“It’s about time we worked together. We can get some stuff done at least. It’s real good she’ll get the help she needs and if anything happens to me I’ll get help. That’s important,” added Vanderheggen.The new agreement took effect Friday morning.Copyright © 2011, WNEP-TVlast_img read more

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